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Beautiful Vintage NIST Measurement Devices

NIST has a wonderful collection of electricity measurement meters, gauges and devices from the era of Edison, Westinghouse and Tesla.

John Blyler

February 23, 2021

16 Slides

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) exists to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology. The success of their efforts is showcased in the digital archives, which contain a digital collection of the most amazing electrical (AC and DC) and electronic test and measurement devices ever built. These devices were used by the National Bureau of Standards in the early 1900s to measure resistance, capacitance, current, voltage, power, and more.

Many of the manufactures of these meters and gages were destined to become household names, such as Siemens and Halske, Leeds & Northrup, Cambridge Instrument, Stanley Electric, Weston, Western Electric Company, and many others.

The following gallery contains but a sample of the rich test and measurement history that is part of NIST.

John Blyler is a Design News senior editor, covering the electronics and advanced manufacturing spaces. With a BS in Engineering Physics and an MS in Electrical Engineering, he has years of hardware-software-network systems experience as an editor and engineer within the advanced manufacturing, IoT and semiconductor industries. John has co-authored books related to system engineering and electronics for IEEE, Wiley, and Elsevier.

Related:Did Edison Really Lose a Non-Existent 'Current War?'

About the Author(s)

John Blyler

John Blyler is a former Design News senior editor, covering the electronics and advanced manufacturing spaces. With a BS in Engineering Physics and an MS in Electrical Engineering, he has years of hardware-software-network systems experience as an engineer and editor within the advanced manufacturing, IoT and semiconductor industries. John has co-authored books related to RF design, system engineering and electronics for IEEE, Wiley, and Elsevier. John currently serves as a standard’s editor for Accellera-IEEE. He has been an affiliate professor at Portland State Univ and a lecturer at UC-Irvine.

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