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Ann R. Thryft

September 22, 2016

3 Min Read
NAVAIR Flies First 3D-Printed Safety-Critical Part

The first 3D-printed flight-critical part to fly on a Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) plane was a success. The recent flight demonstration tested a titanium 3D-printed link and fitting assembly for the engine nacelle of an MV-22B Osprey military aircraft, which will stay on the plane for continued evaluation in future flights.

The test flight at Patuxent River Naval Air Station in Maryland was the first time a US Navy aircraft has flown with a part made with additive manufacturing (AM) that's considered essential to maintaining a safe flight. This metal link and fitting assembly is one of four that attach the V-22's engine nacelle to the primary wing structure.

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About the Author(s)

Ann R. Thryft

Ann R. Thryft has written about manufacturing- and electronics-related technologies for Design News, EE Times, Test & Measurement World, EDN, RTC Magazine, COTS Journal, Nikkei Electronics Asia, Computer Design, and Electronic Buyers' News (EBN). She's introduced readers to several emerging trends: industrial cybersecurity for operational technology, industrial-strength metals 3D printing, RFID, software-defined radio, early mobile phone architectures, open network server and switch/router architectures, and set-top box system design. At EBN Ann won two independently judged Editorial Excellence awards for Best Technology Feature. She holds a BA in Cultural Anthropology from Stanford University and a Certified Business Communicator certificate from the Business Marketing Association (formerly B/PAA).

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