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Articles from 2016 In June


Understanding the New DoE Energy Standards for Electric Motors and Their Impact on You

8 STEM Activities to Fight Summer Boredom

Ah, summer. For young children, it brings eight glorious weeks of fun and freedom. For parents, eight weeks of shuffling, coordinating, and generally doing what can be done to ensure that fun and freedom don’t turn into boredom and wasted opportunity.

In the following slides, Design News offers eight STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) activity options to keep kids engaged this summer, from 10-minute activities to more advanced undertakings.

Click on the image to flip through and be sure to add your own ideas in the comments field below.

Red Planet, here these kids come! NASA’s kids club offers a variety of fun, quick activities for aspiring astronauts. Check it out here. While you’re at it, check out Abigail Harrison, aka Astronaut Abby. This teenager has wanted to be an astronaut since she was 5 years old. She shares every step of her journey toward becoming the first astronaut on Mars through her website and social media, hoping to inspire others to become involved in STEM along the way. Children can’t help but be eager to move toward STEM when they see the amazing things Abby does. (Image Source: NASA)

8 STEM Activities to Fight Summer Boredom

8 STEM Activities to Fight Summer Boredom

Ah, summer. For young children, it brings eight glorious weeks of fun and freedom. For parents, eight weeks of shuffling, coordinating, and generally doing what can be done to ensure that fun and freedom don't turn into boredom and wasted opportunity.

In the following slides, Design News offers eight STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) activity options to keep kids engaged this summer, from 10-minute activities to more advanced undertakings.

Click on the image to flip through and be sure to add your own ideas in the comments field below.

Chaos Happens: What to Do About it on Your Next Product Development Project

In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable. – Dwight D. Eisenhower

Nothing is more frustrating than developing a plan and then, in the heat of the battle, having to diverge from the plan when chaos happens.

This is not just a military phenomenon; this is also true of the plans we make in our product development processes. I have been the recipient of countless Gantt charts and Microsoft Project plans at the beginning of a product development effort, only to see these items get remade so many times that they just get started over or abandoned altogether.


(Source: Google)

Mental Clarity

However, there is a mental clarity that is gained by making an initial plan that will make you more holistically aligned with the project goals, and, therefore, more able to easily adapt to change when chaos makes it necessary.

Did you notice I said “when” not “if”?

This is what General Eisenhower was talking about, and he proved it with his brilliant tactical maneuvers against Hitler in World War II.

How do we achieve such mental clarity in the process of medical device design?

Enemies Everywhere

Planning is great, and creating charts and project plans can be helpful, but General Eisenhower might tell us that the most important thing to do when beginning to plan is to “know thy enemy.”


MD&M Minn logoGet Your Medical Devices to Market. Tom KraMer will be delving into medical product development best practices and sharing tips from hospital value analysis committees on getting your product into hospitals at Medical Design & Manufacturing, Sept. 21-22, 2016 in Minneapolis. Register here for the event, hosted by Design News’ parent company, UBM.


In medical device design and development, our enemies are hidden needs and truths that lie dormant for months and then pop up in a surprise attack during summative studies, thwarting our plans for validation success.

The real tragedy in this scenario is that everything always seems to be going so well up until that point. Budgets are in line, timeframes are in control, and efficacy seems to be strong.


(Source: Google)

When the enemy rears its ugly head and unmet needs surface, we are faced with patients that don’t respond to treatment well, healthcare workers that won’t embrace the use of our device, and purchasers that can’t be convinced to buy it. Band-aids are usually applied at this point, but they are expensive and we end up watching our budget and preciously planned timelines go right out the window.

Chaos Happens: What to Do About it on Your Next Product Development Project

In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable. - Dwight D. Eisenhower

Nothing is more frustrating than developing a plan and then, in the heat of the battle, having to diverge from the plan when chaos happens.

This is not just a military phenomenon; this is also true of the plans we make in our product development processes. I have been the recipient of countless Gantt charts and Microsoft Project plans at the beginning of a product development effort, only to see these items get remade so many times that they just get started over or abandoned altogether.

Mental Clarity

However, there is a mental clarity that is gained by making an initial plan that will make you more holistically aligned with the project goals, and, therefore, more able to easily adapt to change when chaos makes it necessary.

Did you notice I said "when" not "if"?

This is what General Eisenhower was talking about, and he proved it with his brilliant tactical maneuvers against Hitler in World War II.

How do we achieve such mental clarity in the process of medical device design?

Enemies Everywhere

Planning is great, and creating charts and project plans can be helpful, but General Eisenhower might tell us that the most important thing to do when beginning to plan is to "know thy enemy."


MD&M Minn logoGet Your Medical Devices to Market. Tom KraMer will be delving into medical product development best practices and sharing tips from hospital value analysis committees on getting your product into hospitals at Medical Design & Manufacturing, Sept. 21-22, 2016 in Minneapolis. Register here for the event, hosted by Design News’ parent company, UBM.


In medical device design and development, our enemies are hidden needs and truths that lie dormant for months and then pop up in a surprise attack during summative studies, thwarting our plans for validation success.

The real tragedy in this scenario is that everything always seems to be going so well up until that point. Budgets are in line, timeframes are in control, and efficacy seems to be strong.

When the enemy rears its ugly head and unmet needs surface, we are faced with patients that don't respond to treatment well, healthcare workers that won't embrace the use of our device, and purchasers that can't be convinced to buy it. Band-aids are usually applied at this point, but they are expensive and we end up watching our budget and preciously planned timelines go right out the window.

Mean Green Racing Makes Huge Strides in the 2016 Formula SAE Lincoln Competition

Teams from across the US, and several countries worldwide, competed for awards in multiple categories at the 2016 Formula SAE Lincoln competition, which ended June 18. The University of North Texas (UNT) team, featured in an article a few weeks ago, was anxious to improve on their 63rd -place overall standing from last year.

Pre-Event Testing

Pre-event testing included acceleration, brakes, turning, decibels, and much more.

To properly conduct testing on the finished race car, the team needed a parking lot large enough to contain their mock race track. Luckily, UNT’s administrative staff was able to contact the local school district’s athletic complex who were willing to help by offering the use of their huge parking lot.

“Our build schedule got pretty tight toward the end. Coming into that third week before the race, we had driven the car but had not run it hard,” said Justin Vincik, student vice president of UNT’s Mean Green Racing.

Unexpected Problems

Once the team had run the car “hard” they broke an axle spindle only two weeks before event start; the spindle holds on the wheel and brake assembly. “We contacted our sponsors, but they couldn’t get a new spindle to us quickly enough,” said Vincik. “We had to scramble to make our own spindle at school.” The team worked a manual lathe for turning operations for nearly three days. The remaining operations were CNC milled.

The spindle breakage also bent the brake rotor and ruined the brake pads. Replacing the brake pads caused no issues, but the new rotor differed slightly from the other three. “It made a slight clicking sound that we just had to live with,” said Vincik.

Formula SAE decibel requirements are 100 DBC at idle and 110 DBC at 11,000 rpm, which presented another challenge to the team. “Our car is a 4-cylinder, so it runs at a really low decibel level, so we [naturally] have a lot of low-end noise,” said Vincik. The team had to get creative -- and quickly! Their solution included adding another loop of pipe with an additional muffler to quiet the car within the required ranges.

Safety Inspection and Static Events

UNT passed all safety and technical inspections with flying colors. This in itself was a win for UNT’s Mean Green Racing. Last year the team was only able to participate in the Static events because of a problem with an engine control unit -- they did not get a chance to race their car in the dynamic events.

Static events include design, cost, and business presentations. For design presentation, judges evaluate the engineering effort that went into the design of the car and how the engineering fulfills the needs of the market both in terms of vehicle performance and overall value.

For the cost presentation, students present the car as if selling 100 units. The judges even question specific details, such as what machining processes were used for certain components, and then they question if that process was the best choice for that particular component or group of components. “It is a very conversational interaction with the SAE judges,” said Vincik. “They want to know the specific details of how the car was built so they can determine if it was built in a cost-effective manner.”

The business case presentation is designed to teach students about the factors that need to be considered when a company embarks on the development of a new product. These include identification of market and likely sales volume, profitability, key features applicable to the selected vehicle concept, and target market size.

“The business presentation is set up similar to a Shark Tank type of scenario,” said Kyle McDougal, Mean Green Racing team manager. “The presentation is in front of three judges, where we pitch the car as the best solution for the weekend autocross racer.” This provides opportunity for young engineers to begin to make the connection that what they build must be sold. If it cannot be sold, it has no value to the company. They get to experience, firsthand, the importance of selling concepts, designs, and ideas to buyers.

Dynamic Events

Things begin to get extremely exciting for the students in the Dynamic events because their baby -- the car they have all worked so hard to design, build, and test -- is finally given the chance to race against the other competitors. Dynamic events include:

Skidpad, a circular area of flat pavement used for various tests of a car's handling:

Acceleration:

Autocross:

After the Autocross event, Mean Green Racing discovered another spindle-related issue. “The weak threads were first discovered when we tried to torque the right-side hub down,” said Vincik. “This time, the nut had stripped the threads that hold it tight to the bearing. Taylor Race Engineering helped us onsite to make the fix.” The end fix was re-cutting the threads to a smaller nut and ensuring that the threads were cut deeper, so they could grab on to the correct amount of material.

Endurance:

The Endurance event is often the make-or-break event for many teams.

If a car leaks any kind of fluid, it is pulled off the track. If a car stalls and cannot be started, it is out. If a car gets a flat tire -- out. If an engine starts on fire -- out. (This actually happened but no one was hurt, thanks to properly equipped, quick FSAE volunteers.)

The Endurance event is worth one-third of all points possible for the competition. It is a 22 km race with two team members: driver one races seven laps and driver two does eight. For Mean Green Racing, a problem became apparent at the driver change. The left hub had stripped the threads that hold the wheel tight.

As the judges were looking over the car during driver change (standard safety procedure), they noticed one of the front wheels was loose when they checked the suspension components to ensure nothing was broken. “By the rules we are required to have a locking nut on the spindles with at least two threads showing,” said Vincik. “Our lock nut had stripped some threads but we were still within the rule requirements, and the nut was not moving when they tried to turn it by hand. So they let us continue racing!”

Overall event scores are still being calculated.

Preliminary results show that Mean Green Racing placed 33rd overall -- a big improvement over last year. “The Formula SAE Collegiate Design Series is a great chance for students to begin shaping their worlds in tangible ways that are both career-enhancing and lots of fun,” said Ken Coburn, owner of GoEngineer, a Mean Green Racing sponsor. “GoEngineer is proud to sponsor these up-and-coming engineers!”

Click here for more information.

[image via Mean Green Racing/GoEngineer]

Mitch Bossart is a technology enthusiast, and he loves writing about people and companies that are shaping our world. You will find him at various coffee shops throughout the Minneapolis/St. Paul area -- writing, socializing, or dreaming about the next great American screenplay.

Mean Green Racing Makes Huge Strides in the 2016 Formula SAE Lincoln Competition

Mean Green Racing Makes Huge Strides in the 2016 Formula SAE Lincoln Competition

Teams from across the US, and several countries worldwide, competed for awards in multiple categories at the 2016 Formula SAE Lincoln competition, which ended June 18. The University of North Texas (UNT) team, featured in an article a few weeks ago, was anxious to improve on their 63rd -place overall standing from last year.

Pre-Event Testing

Pre-event testing included acceleration, brakes, turning, decibels, and much more.

To properly conduct testing on the finished race car, the team needed a parking lot large enough to contain their mock race track. Luckily, UNT's administrative staff was able to contact the local school district's athletic complex who were willing to help by offering the use of their huge parking lot.

"Our build schedule got pretty tight toward the end. Coming into that third week before the race, we had driven the car but had not run it hard," said Justin Vincik, student vice president of UNT's Mean Green Racing.

Unexpected Problems

Once the team had run the car "hard" they broke an axle spindle only two weeks before event start; the spindle holds on the wheel and brake assembly. "We contacted our sponsors, but they couldn't get a new spindle to us quickly enough," said Vincik. "We had to scramble to make our own spindle at school." The team worked a manual lathe for turning operations for nearly three days. The remaining operations were CNC milled.

The spindle breakage also bent the brake rotor and ruined the brake pads. Replacing the brake pads caused no issues, but the new rotor differed slightly from the other three. "It made a slight clicking sound that we just had to live with," said Vincik.

Formula SAE decibel requirements are 100 DBC at idle and 110 DBC at 11,000 rpm, which presented another challenge to the team. "Our car is a 4-cylinder, so it runs at a really low decibel level, so we [naturally] have a lot of low-end noise," said Vincik. The team had to get creative -- and quickly! Their solution included adding another loop of pipe with an additional muffler to quiet the car within the required ranges.

Safety Inspection and Static Events

UNT passed all safety and technical inspections with flying colors. This in itself was a win for UNT's Mean Green Racing. Last year the team was only able to participate in the Static events because of a problem with an engine control unit -- they did not get a chance to race their car in the dynamic events.

Static events include design, cost, and business presentations. For design presentation, judges evaluate the engineering effort that went into the design of the car and how the engineering fulfills the needs of the market both in terms of vehicle performance and overall value.

For the cost presentation, students present the car as if selling 100 units. The judges even question specific details, such as what machining processes were used for certain components, and then they question if that process was the best choice for that particular component or group of components. "It is a very conversational interaction with the SAE judges," said Vincik. "They want to know the specific details of how the car was built so they can determine if it was built in a cost-effective manner."

The business case presentation is designed to teach students about the factors that need to be considered when a company embarks on the development of a new product. These include identification of market and likely sales volume, profitability, key features applicable to the selected vehicle concept, and target market size.

"The business presentation is set up similar to a Shark Tank type of scenario," said Kyle McDougal, Mean Green Racing team manager. "The presentation is in front of three judges, where we pitch the car as the best solution for the weekend autocross racer." This provides opportunity for young engineers to begin to make the connection that what they build must be sold. If it cannot be sold, it has no value to the company. They get to experience, firsthand, the importance of selling concepts, designs, and ideas to buyers.

Dynamic Events

Things begin to get extremely exciting for the students in the Dynamic events because their baby -- the car they have all worked so hard to design, build, and test -- is finally given the chance to race against the other competitors. Dynamic events include:

Skidpad, a circular area of flat pavement used for various tests of a car's handling:

Acceleration:

Autocross:

After the Autocross event, Mean Green Racing discovered another spindle-related issue. "The weak threads were first discovered when we tried to torque the right-side hub down," said Vincik. "This time, the nut had stripped the threads that hold it tight to the bearing. Taylor Race Engineering helped us onsite to make the fix." The end fix was re-cutting the threads to a smaller nut and ensuring that the threads were cut deeper, so they could grab on to the correct amount of material.

Endurance:

The Endurance event is often the make-or-break event for many teams.

If a car leaks any kind of fluid, it is pulled off the track. If a car stalls and cannot be started, it is out. If a car gets a flat tire -- out. If an engine starts on fire -- out. (This actually happened but no one was hurt, thanks to properly equipped, quick FSAE volunteers.)

The Endurance event is worth one-third of all points possible for the competition. It is a 22 km race with two team members: driver one races seven laps and driver two does eight. For Mean Green Racing, a problem became apparent at the driver change. The left hub had stripped the threads that hold the wheel tight.

As the judges were looking over the car during driver change (standard safety procedure), they noticed one of the front wheels was loose when they checked the suspension components to ensure nothing was broken. "By the rules we are required to have a locking nut on the spindles with at least two threads showing," said Vincik. "Our lock nut had stripped some threads but we were still within the rule requirements, and the nut was not moving when they tried to turn it by hand. So they let us continue racing!"

Overall event scores are still being calculated.

Preliminary results show that Mean Green Racing placed 33rd overall -- a big improvement over last year. "The Formula SAE Collegiate Design Series is a great chance for students to begin shaping their worlds in tangible ways that are both career-enhancing and lots of fun," said Ken Coburn, owner of GoEngineer, a Mean Green Racing sponsor. "GoEngineer is proud to sponsor these up-and-coming engineers!"

Click here for more information.

[image via Mean Green Racing/GoEngineer]

Mitch Bossart is a technology enthusiast, and he loves writing about people and companies that are shaping our world. You will find him at various coffee shops throughout the Minneapolis/St. Paul area -- writing, socializing, or dreaming about the next great American screenplay.

Get Hands On When Debugging Real-time Embedded Software

The greatest challenge facing embedded system developers is debugging software. Embedded systems have become highly complex, running real-time operating systems, connectivity stacks, USB, and security among a wide variety of other system code even before getting to the application. Yet a significant number of engineers that I encounter still only use breakpoints to debug their software, despite the many modern and advanced techniques available to engineers today. For this reason, I have created an opportunity to learn modern debugging techniques by developing an online course. The 45-minute per day free course will take place July 11-15, and will walk engineers through a hands-on approach to debugging real-time embedded software.

Why take a course? Reading about a debugging technique is one thing, but actually setting up and trying out the technique is a completely different experience. In order to get a real feel for how the techniques can be used, the course will be using an NXP K64F Freedom board that includes an ARM Cortex-M4 processor running at 120 MHz with 1 MB of flash space and 256 kB of RAM. The K64F board comes with Arduino R3 headers already populated along with a myriad of other features such as Ethernet, accelerometer, SD card slot, camera expansion header, on-board debugger, LEDs, and a few others. At only $35USD, the board is a very inexpensive, yet powerful development kit well suited for exploring debug techniques.

The course will start out by walking students through the steps required to setup the development kit and the tool chain. Because the development kit has a powerful ARM M4 processor onboard, attendees will also get a quick introduction to FreeRTOS and how to rapidly deploy it for use in an embedded system. The setup will form the foundation and basic framework from which the various development techniques will be explored.

Before diving into the advanced topics, traditional techniques such as the use of printf and assert will be examined. Developers will typically tie printf to a MCU peripheral UART, which can cause problems with the real-time performance of the system if care isn’t taken. We’ll examine how to reduce the impact printf has on real-time performance while also examining the alternative of using the built-in core features to decrease its impact to near zero. Debugging an embedded system sometimes requires a detailed understanding of the processor, especially when faults within the core are at issue. We’ll be diving into the details of the ARM Cortex-M exceptions and the debug modules and hardware available to assist in debugging software. This hardware includes the Serial Wire Debugger (SWD) and the Serial Wire Output (SWO) that have become indispensable.

The most exciting part about the course is going to undoubtedly be the setup and experimentation with real-time tracing tools such as System Viewer and Tracealyzer. The ability to visually explore how an embedded system is functioning and to retrieve information such as minimum, average, and maximum task execution times can be unprecedented. We will be exploring how these tools work and how as developers we can get the most from these technologies.

Debugging an embedded system is a necessary evil of the design cycle despite carefully crafted design and implementation. Understanding how to quickly and efficiently debug a system can save development costs and decrease time to market. What techniques are you using to debug your embedded system?

You can sign up for the course, which includes live Q&A, here, and if you can’t attend the live classes, they will be archived for later reference.

Jacob Beningo is a Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) whose expertise is in embedded software. He works with companies to decrease costs and time to market while maintaining a quality and robust product. He is an avid tweeter, a tip and trick guru, a homebrew connoisseur, and a fan of pineapple! Feel free to contact him at [email protected], at his website www.beningo.com, and sign up for his monthly Embedded Bytes Newsletter here.

Get Hands On When Debugging Real-time Embedded Software

Get Hands On When Debugging Real-time Embedded Software

The greatest challenge facing embedded system developers is debugging software. Embedded systems have become highly complex, running real-time operating systems, connectivity stacks, USB, and security among a wide variety of other system code even before getting to the application. Yet a significant number of engineers that I encounter still only use breakpoints to debug their software, despite the many modern and advanced techniques available to engineers today. For this reason, I have created an opportunity to learn modern debugging techniques by developing an online course. The 45-minute per day free course will take place July 11-15, and will walk engineers through a hands-on approach to debugging real-time embedded software.

Why take a course? Reading about a debugging technique is one thing, but actually setting up and trying out the technique is a completely different experience. In order to get a real feel for how the techniques can be used, the course will be using an NXP K64F Freedom board that includes an ARM Cortex-M4 processor running at 120 MHz with 1 MB of flash space and 256 kB of RAM. The K64F board comes with Arduino R3 headers already populated along with a myriad of other features such as Ethernet, accelerometer, SD card slot, camera expansion header, on-board debugger, LEDs, and a few others. At only $35USD, the board is a very inexpensive, yet powerful development kit well suited for exploring debug techniques.

The course will start out by walking students through the steps required to setup the development kit and the tool chain. Because the development kit has a powerful ARM M4 processor onboard, attendees will also get a quick introduction to FreeRTOS and how to rapidly deploy it for use in an embedded system. The setup will form the foundation and basic framework from which the various development techniques will be explored.

Before diving into the advanced topics, traditional techniques such as the use of printf and assert will be examined. Developers will typically tie printf to a MCU peripheral UART, which can cause problems with the real-time performance of the system if care isn't taken. We'll examine how to reduce the impact printf has on real-time performance while also examining the alternative of using the built-in core features to decrease its impact to near zero. Debugging an embedded system sometimes requires a detailed understanding of the processor, especially when faults within the core are at issue. We'll be diving into the details of the ARM Cortex-M exceptions and the debug modules and hardware available to assist in debugging software. This hardware includes the Serial Wire Debugger (SWD) and the Serial Wire Output (SWO) that have become indispensable.

The most exciting part about the course is going to undoubtedly be the setup and experimentation with real-time tracing tools such as System Viewer and Tracealyzer. The ability to visually explore how an embedded system is functioning and to retrieve information such as minimum, average, and maximum task execution times can be unprecedented. We will be exploring how these tools work and how as developers we can get the most from these technologies.

Debugging an embedded system is a necessary evil of the design cycle despite carefully crafted design and implementation. Understanding how to quickly and efficiently debug a system can save development costs and decrease time to market. What techniques are you using to debug your embedded system?

You can sign up for the course, which includes live Q&A, here, and if you can't attend the live classes, they will be archived for later reference.

Jacob Beningo is a Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) whose expertise is in embedded software. He works with companies to decrease costs and time to market while maintaining a quality and robust product. He is an avid tweeter, a tip and trick guru, a homebrew connoisseur, and a fan of pineapple! Feel free to contact him at [email protected], at his website www.beningo.com, and sign up for his monthly Embedded Bytes Newsletter here.

Register Early for ARM TechCon 2016 and Save Big Bucks

Registration is now open for ARM TechCon 2016, which will take place October, 25-27 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, Calif., and you can get big savings if you sign up during the Early Bird registration. Click here to register now.

The ARM TechCon conference facilitates the collaboration between hardware and software communities with the goal of creating a more integrated and collaborative design environment. The event, managed by Design News’ parent company UBM, brings together hardware engineers, software developers, and system architects working across a broad range of applications, from wearables to drones to servers. ARM TechCon provides informational sessions and offers networking opportunities for those working on ARM-based products, showcasing innovative design techniques and deep technical dives on how to solve the latest design challenges.

Each year TechCon gets bigger, and this year they’re pulling out all the stops. As I type, the Technical Program Committee is busy poring over the record number of submissions to the Call for Proposals and choosing the cream of the crop to be presented to you during the technical sessions and panel discussions.

To toss a few numbers around: there will be 100+ hours of content this year, presented by more than 140 industry experts who, to put it bluntly, really know their stuff, embedded and otherwise. And the 4,500 expected attendees will mean peer networking at its best.

Some far less interesting numbers, but ones that can put big bucks back in your bottom line -- If you register before July 8, using Super Early Bird rates, you can save $650 off All-Access or Conference registration, and $125 off individual Training Day registration. Don’t dismay if you miss that deadline, Early Bird rates continue to August 26 and get you $450 off All-Access or Conference registration, and $100 off individual Training Day registration. See the Pricing page for details.

The Group Discount gets you another 30% off current rates -- including the Super Early Bird offer. And there are also providing huge Educator, Student, and Government discounts.

Here are some more details:

  • NEW! All-Access Pass – The ultimate ARM TechCon experience starts here. Get the whole show and no restrictions: Every training session, demo, panel, case study, and speaker are open to you. It’s the hottest ticket for those looking to squeeze every drop of insight, networking, and opportunity from their three days.
  • Conference Pass – The ticket for serious ARM-based education. Unlock nine conference tracks, over 70 hours of expert-led education, and more than 140 leading speakers. Access exclusive demos, hands-on workshops, teardowns, and panels packed with insight on the latest in embedded systems. (Try and fit that in three days at the office.)
  • ARM Training Day Pass – Full understanding requires more than your full attention … it requires time. That’s why we’re bringing three full-day embedded Training Days to the show: Mobile (Tuesday), Hardware (Wednesday), and Software (Thursday). You can purchase each day separately to tailor your deep dive training to meet your needs.

Access to the expo floor is free, so if you’re unsure, you can always get your Expo Pass now and upgrade to any of the above at a later date. But don’t wait too long because these rates won’t last.