The Linux Steampunk Conference Badge: Page 2 of 4

Break the ice at your next tech conference by building a full function, Steampunk-themed Linux wearable.

HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Range Finder

1

DigiKey

1568-1421-ND

Maxim DS18B20 Digital Temperature Sensor

1

DigiKey

DS18B20-ND
 

10-32 brass thumbscrews

4

Hardware store

 

10-32 x 1/2” brass screws

12

Hardware store

 

10-32 brass nuts

12

Hardware store

 

10 gauge wireless

3 inches

Hardware store

 

3/16” thin-wall brass tubing

2 - 36" lengths (use as needed)

Hobby Store

 

1/4” x 1/16” thick brass flat stock

1 - 36" length (use as needed)

 

 

26 gauge flexible wire

 

salvage from old serial mouse cable

 

22 gauge solid core wire

 

salvage from solid-core CAT 5 cable

 

USB-mini USB cable

1

 

 

2 x 20 female header

1

connector salvaged from old IDE hard drive cable

 

2200 to 10000 mAh 5 volt power bank battery

1

 

 

SPST Toggle Switch

1

Sparkfun

COM-09276

SPST Micro-Switch

1

Sparkfun

COM-00098

Header Push Pins

as needed

Sparkfun

PRT-12693

1K resistor (brn/bblk/red)

1

Sparkfun

COM-13760

Through-Hole Resistor – 4.7K ohm 5% 1/4W (yellow/purple/red)

1

Adafruit

2783

 

 

 

 

Optional:

 

 

 

Logitech K400 keyboard/mouse-pad

1

Office Depot

729357

 

 

 

 

Tools:

 

 

 

Weller 100/140 Watt soldering gun

 

 

 

Plumber's copper pipe cutter

 

 

 

Side cutters

 

 

 

Needle-nose pliers

 

 

 

Wire stripper

 

 

 

Flat screwdriver

 

 

 

3rd arm jig

 

 

 

Drill

 

 

 

Leather punch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software

 

 

 

Adafruit/Raspbian Linux w/ PiTFT support

Image burned on the Raspberry Pi 3 micro-SD card

 

 

Fritzing

Electrical diagram design program

runs on Linux notebook

 

Arduino IDE

Arduino programming interactive development environment

runs on Linux notebook

 

kdenlive

Video editing software used for promo clips

runs on Linux notebook

 

 

BUILD INSTRUCTIONS

Here's the Fritzing layout of the electrical components. I wasn't able to find a library part file for the 3.5" 480 x 320 PiTFT module, so I simply broke out the cable connections, from the Raspberry Pi to the display with labels.

 

Pi-to-TFT Screen Cable

The Pi-to-TFT screen cable was fabbed-up by salvaging a 2 x 20 connector from an old IDE hard-drive cable. Take the cable retainer clip off the back and peel away the ribbon cable, being careful not to pull the pins out of the connector. You can then solder solid core 22-gauge wire to the connector pins and route the wires to male push pins that plug into the display's 2 x 20 header. I think the exposed soldered connector, on the front of the Pi, enhances the “engineering” look of the badge.

Exposed Raspberry Pi Connector Detail

 

PiTFT Display Push Pins Detail (back side)

The Auxiliary Arduino Pro-Mini, Ultrasonic Range Finder, and DS18B20 Digital Thermometer

An auxiliary Arduino Pro-Mini (5V,16 MHz model), connects serially to the Pi through a level-shifter board, to get near-real time readings from the ultrasonic range finder. There's also analog input pins available for as-yet undefined new badge features. The rangefinder will eventually pulse an tri-color

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