Complete Your Security & Loss Prevention Strategy

Gregory Breads

March 24, 2014

3 Min Read
Complete Your  Security & Loss Prevention Strategy

In recent years, there's been an exponential growth in electronic data and critical assets stored on servers in data centers. The expansion of cloud services has not only helped make this possible, but has also enabled a growth trend that's predicted to continue at a rapid rate over the next five to ten years.

Previously, businesses focused solely on the security of their buildings and datacenter rooms to ensure the protection of their sensitive information. This is no longer enough to satisfy a complete security and loss-prevention strategy. Government regulations, coupled with growing consumer sensitivity about data and identity theft, require that data-storage organizations demonstrate proper protection and due diligence in protecting sensitive information stored inside datacenter enclosures.

Cyber-attacks and security have become a regular topic in the media because criminal hackers pose a perpetual threat to any company's secure data. They present a larger dilemma in that hackers persistently develop new methods to steal sensitive data by looking for any vulnerable spots in a system. Businesses must accept that external cyber-attacks are no longer the only threats to a firm's sensitive data. Companies need to turn to focus equally on the possibility of internal security breaches. There are a variety of individuals, including employees and contractors, who enter a firm's datacenter on a daily basis, performing a range of services, from cleaning, to software updates, to new hardware installation and troubleshooting. Each datacenter visitor presents a breach opportunity if a company doesn't have a monitoring and management system in place at the enclosure level. Companies can no longer afford to be reactive in these situations. They must be proactive to all potential security risks and threats.

Most businesses maintain effective protective measures for their building and room security, but often overlook data security at the enclosure level. They can be protected in a various ways with different types of physical access control tools, but some methods aren't considered effective. Mechanical keyed systems are not secure. Keys can be lost or duplicated. The ability to audit access to the enclosure is difficult and unreliable. A proactive solution for companies to avoid any internal threats is to install security management software designed to protect sensitive data at the enclosure level by controlling, monitoring, and auditing who has access to an enclosure at any given time.

Government agencies are no longer waiting for companies to secure their data. They're now forcing compliance with updated regulations such as HIPAA, PCI DSS, FISMA, and Sarbanes-Oxley. Protection at the enclosure level is essential to a fully integrated loss-prevention strategy, not only to satisfy the above compliance regulations, but also to retain customer trust.

Greg Breads, of Dirak Inc., is responsible for all sales and marketing efforts in North America, leading the new product development effort to ensure application requirements are achieved through innovative product design and operational efficiencies.

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About the Author(s)

Gregory Breads

Greg Breads, of Dirak Inc., is responsible for all sales and marketing efforts in North America, leading the new product development effort to ensure application requirements are achieved through innovative product design and operational efficiencies. Greg works closely with design engineers to provide the right solution for their application.

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