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Elizabeth M
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Impressive chemistry
Elizabeth M   8/19/2014 6:35:42 AM
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Wow, even if this is nowhere near ready for prime time, it's pretty impressive stuff. Not being a scientists, I am amazed by the way researchers are manipulating matter and materials to create something like this. As you say, the liquid they've created is impressive enough, and the potential for data storage is a bit mind blowing at the moment. I wonder how far we really are until this type of thing is a reality.

a2
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Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
a2   8/19/2014 6:47:27 AM
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@Elizebeth: Things do change very quickly. It actually changes its pattern overnight. It's hard to predict what will be the next step but what I'm fascinated on is how the human brain grabs all these things and throws out the output. It's the humans who decide on these developments. 

naperlou
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Re: Impressive chemistry
naperlou   8/19/2014 12:27:42 PM
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I wrote about the DNA based storage (http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=2583010 on this site last year.  As with many of these approaches, they all seem to be 5 to 10 years away.  It is one thing to increase density.  It is another to provide a fast way to read the information.  Even standard 3.5" disk drives for PCs and servers are available at your local electronics store in 4GB sizes.  These are not very expensive (under $200 for standard speed, and under $250 for higher speed drives).  I know there are limits to the exising technology, but they seem to be very large.  I expect many of these technologies, like DNA storage, are going to be good for long term, off-line storage.  Believe it or not, but in many cases tapes are still used for this purpose.

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   8/19/2014 9:54:32 PM
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naperlou

I agree. Today's drives seem to be stable in terms of function and storage capability. I'm quite interesting in seeing data as it relates to the liquid substance storing bits of data. Quite and interesting concept in new materials and their ability to store bits and bytes of digital data.

fdos
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Iron
Re: Impressive chemistry
fdos   8/19/2014 11:30:26 PM
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@mrdon: Yes amazing indeed. There will be no disk full issues atleast

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   8/20/2014 12:23:12 AM
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fdos

I agree. It is amazing that such a liquid material has the capability of storing binary data.Another question that comes to mind is the liquid material's longevitiy to retain the binary data. Floppy disk's data retention were several years before the bits and bytes of data started detaching its self from the storage media.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   8/20/2014 3:44:01 AM
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"I agree. It is amazing that such a liquid material has the capability of storing binary data. Another question that comes to mind is the liquid material's longevitiy to retain the binary data. Floppy disk's data retention were several years before the bits and bytes of data started detaching its self from the storage media."

Mrdon, Cabe explained that it's in fantasy stage. So such questions are not valid. In practical there may be many issues like liquid structure can be change at instance and hence the order of data storage can also be change.

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   8/22/2014 1:12:08 PM
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Mydesign,

 Totally understood: my comment was more of me thinking out loud. I would be nice if such data was available to review.

Mydesign
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Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   8/25/2014 12:10:00 AM
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" Totally understood: my comment was more of me thinking out loud. I would be nice if such data was available to review."

Mrdon, not an issue.

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   9/20/2014 9:40:00 PM
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Mydesign

I totally understand. I too think out loud when I'm working on a new product design. I think this behavior is in the DNA of most creative people.

Mydesign
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Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   9/23/2014 9:08:19 AM
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"I totally understand. I too think out loud when I'm working on a new product design. I think this behavior is in the DNA of most creative people."

Mrdon, that's the normal way of thinking. We used to say it as an out of box thinking. 

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   9/20/2014 9:40:00 PM
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Mydesign

I totally understand. I too think out loud when I'm working on a new product design. I think this behavior is in the DNA of most creative people.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   9/23/2014 9:11:59 AM
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"I totally understand. I too think out loud when I'm working on a new product design. I think this behavior is in the DNA of most creative people."

Mrdon, that's level pf peoples. it can be at beginning or on due course of the design phase.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   10/20/2014 6:17:07 PM
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Mydesign,

Some would say its insanity to talk out loud. I say its genius!

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   10/24/2014 3:32:36 AM
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"Some would say its insanity to talk out loud. I say its genius!"

Mrdon, you may be right if they are not out spoken.

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   10/20/2014 6:18:34 PM
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Mydesign,

I totally agree that it is in the DNA of creative people. Long live imagination!!!

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   10/24/2014 3:34:13 AM
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"I totally agree that it is in the DNA of creative people. Long live imagination!!!"

Mrdon, some may have inborn talence. They have to only polish it on due course of time.

mrdon
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Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   10/20/2014 6:19:43 PM
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MYdesign,

Your observations and comments are right on target!

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   10/24/2014 3:31:45 AM
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"Your observations and comments are right on target!"

Mrdon, am not getting what do you meant by this.

fredsay
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Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
fredsay   8/20/2014 9:40:22 AM
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One rule of computers states that: "Data will grow to fill all available space".

 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Impressive chemistry
Elizabeth M   8/20/2014 7:24:55 AM
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Yes, it's amazing, considering that liquid is a moving thing, a2. And I agree, that the human mind continues to impress with the diversity of its solutions for problems.

Battar
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Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Battar   8/20/2014 9:13:48 AM
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5 minutes wasted on any social media site is enough to convince me that even today tha capacity for data storage is way ahead of the value of the data being stored.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Table spoon of liquid hard drive
Mydesign   8/20/2014 3:41:38 AM
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"Two material scientists, Sharon Glotzer and David Pine, are on a mission to create the world's first, which should prove to allow for mega data densities. Their current calculations estimate that one teaspoon of this liquid data would be able to store 1 TB of data. That's science fiction-level impressive. This research is still at its infancy; there is no working prototype."

Cabe, great. I think it will be get productized very soon. Instead of carrying big SSD and external hard disk, just carry a one or two table spoon of liquid hard drive

hstearnsjr
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Iron
StarTrek
hstearnsjr   8/20/2014 9:46:27 AM
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Remember the "Gel Packs" that were essential elements of the Star Trek NG Enterprise's computer.

theGrognerd
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Iron
Overstated innovation?
theGrognerd   8/20/2014 10:06:59 AM
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As impressive as 1TB=1tsp sounds, what occurs to me is that it's only the recording media. If you scraped off the actual recording media in a standard 1TB hard drive, it'd be much less than 1 teaspoon. The industry is approaching 1TB on 1 square inch of disk surface--and those films are microscopically thin.

And there are still (as the article says) problems of organizing liquid data--how do you know which bit goes with which byte, and in what order? And how do you find the byte you're looking for when it's floating in a sea of liquid? How many suspended molecules do you have to search before you find the right one? The article says there's currently no way of telling the difference between a zero and a one, and no way to write consistently yet. I might expect solutions to all those challenges to take up a lot more space than 1tsp/TB.

And I'd love to work on solving them. But magnetic hard drives set the bar really high. Today, you can get 1TB of hard drive for $60, in a package not much bigger than an iPhone. That price isn't likely to go up. Is liquid storage density still going to be competitive in 20 years?

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Overstated innovation?
William K.   8/20/2014 11:11:27 AM
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Grognerd is totally correct. Even the older 20mB hard drives had a very much smaller volume of actual storage medium.  But my much greater question is about keeping track of the data locations. Liquids that are indeed liquids are normally fluid, and hence prone to reorganization. So the stablization of addresses is sort of vital.

The other assertion is also very true, which is that the value of so much that is saved is questionable at best. "Big Data" may wind up being the most outstanding example of that assertion. The analysis of the huge volumes to deliver any useful insight is probably beyond at least any economical process at this time, and probably for quite a while yet. The human mind is a far better mechanism to apply.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Move forward, but donít throw away the past
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/20/2014 5:16:46 PM
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Wow. Moving fast toward new and innovative ideas; completely OUT-of the BOX from our current thinking.  Really cool ideas for the future.  I just hope we don't run head-first in to the "Next Big Thing" and abandon many of the "Sure Things" we depend on every day.  Nothing wrong with the magnetic media we use today, and I hope it stays around for decades  -- or more.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
Cabe Atwell   8/21/2014 12:14:53 AM
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Where is our trinary systems, real quantum processing, and cryctal data storage?

Just saying.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/21/2014 11:41:02 AM
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Laughing, in acknowledgment.  Your solutions are likely lurking right there, in one of those little blobs, in the water! It'll just take a few more years to recognize them.  (they're only like the zygote stage, right now!)

a.saji
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Silver
Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
a.saji   8/21/2014 3:35:14 AM
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@JimT: Surely it will be there in the future as well but not sure whether it will function as it is now because things will change and the things that are hits these days will become outdated products in the future. 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/21/2014 11:47:44 AM
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I know you're right.  The best way for a product to fade away, is when it becomes useless in obsoletion. That is the natural way, and everyone would accept that.   

But my point was, that sometimes, competing technologies tend to crowd-out perfectly viable alternate technologies, and the financial winner becomes the dominant champion.  The loser wasn't necessarily obsolete; just beaten down.  Like Beta vs. VHS; or Nextel-iDEN protocol vs. Sprint-CDMA. Both losers in these two examples were technically superior products.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
Cabe Atwell   8/21/2014 3:18:45 PM
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Jim,

Beta was still used at television stations! I never lost, really.

 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/21/2014 5:49:07 PM
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Thanks,  Cabe – I did not know that.  But I guess that underlines the point that Beta must've been superior, and the mass market still squeezed it out.  That was the point I was trying to make about keeping existing (good) technologies while allowing other (new) technologies to advance, without necessarily obsoleting the previous.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
Cabe Atwell   8/26/2014 5:05:12 PM
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JimT,

I would have liked to see HD-DVD stick around alongside Bluray.

I recently could several boxes of VHS tapes and realized one valuable thing about media... format means nothing. The ability to use it in any particular form could vanish. So, I say straight digital is the only way to go.

Cloud based storage of all media (music, video, data) is the only true way to survive format obsolecence. 

Now I either convert the VHS tapes to digital, or I recycle them. Leaning toways the later.

Cabe

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Move forward, but donít throw away the past
Mydesign   8/25/2014 12:12:57 AM
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"Surely it will be there in the future as well but not sure whether it will function as it is now because things will change and the things that are hits these days will become outdated products in the future"

Saji, certain things are unpredictable. We have seen in audio recording media for audio players. Initially its recorded in disk, then tapes and then again back to CD etc.

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Mind blowing
Cadman-LT   8/21/2014 10:44:47 AM
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Great article Cabe. That's some really mind blowing stuff there. The things people come with just amazes me to no end.



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