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theGrognerd
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Iron
Overstated innovation?
theGrognerd   8/20/2014 10:06:59 AM
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As impressive as 1TB=1tsp sounds, what occurs to me is that it's only the recording media. If you scraped off the actual recording media in a standard 1TB hard drive, it'd be much less than 1 teaspoon. The industry is approaching 1TB on 1 square inch of disk surface--and those films are microscopically thin.

And there are still (as the article says) problems of organizing liquid data--how do you know which bit goes with which byte, and in what order? And how do you find the byte you're looking for when it's floating in a sea of liquid? How many suspended molecules do you have to search before you find the right one? The article says there's currently no way of telling the difference between a zero and a one, and no way to write consistently yet. I might expect solutions to all those challenges to take up a lot more space than 1tsp/TB.

And I'd love to work on solving them. But magnetic hard drives set the bar really high. Today, you can get 1TB of hard drive for $60, in a package not much bigger than an iPhone. That price isn't likely to go up. Is liquid storage density still going to be competitive in 20 years?

hstearnsjr
User Rank
Iron
StarTrek
hstearnsjr   8/20/2014 9:46:27 AM
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Remember the "Gel Packs" that were essential elements of the Star Trek NG Enterprise's computer.

fredsay
User Rank
Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
fredsay   8/20/2014 9:40:22 AM
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One rule of computers states that: "Data will grow to fill all available space".

 

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Battar   8/20/2014 9:13:48 AM
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5 minutes wasted on any social media site is enough to convince me that even today tha capacity for data storage is way ahead of the value of the data being stored.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Impressive chemistry
Elizabeth M   8/20/2014 7:24:55 AM
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Yes, it's amazing, considering that liquid is a moving thing, a2. And I agree, that the human mind continues to impress with the diversity of its solutions for problems.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Impressive chemistry
Mydesign   8/20/2014 3:44:01 AM
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1 saves
"I agree. It is amazing that such a liquid material has the capability of storing binary data. Another question that comes to mind is the liquid material's longevitiy to retain the binary data. Floppy disk's data retention were several years before the bits and bytes of data started detaching its self from the storage media."

Mrdon, Cabe explained that it's in fantasy stage. So such questions are not valid. In practical there may be many issues like liquid structure can be change at instance and hence the order of data storage can also be change.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Table spoon of liquid hard drive
Mydesign   8/20/2014 3:41:38 AM
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1 saves
"Two material scientists, Sharon Glotzer and David Pine, are on a mission to create the world's first, which should prove to allow for mega data densities. Their current calculations estimate that one teaspoon of this liquid data would be able to store 1 TB of data. That's science fiction-level impressive. This research is still at its infancy; there is no working prototype."

Cabe, great. I think it will be get productized very soon. Instead of carrying big SSD and external hard disk, just carry a one or two table spoon of liquid hard drive

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   8/20/2014 12:23:12 AM
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fdos

I agree. It is amazing that such a liquid material has the capability of storing binary data.Another question that comes to mind is the liquid material's longevitiy to retain the binary data. Floppy disk's data retention were several years before the bits and bytes of data started detaching its self from the storage media.

fdos
User Rank
Iron
Re: Impressive chemistry
fdos   8/19/2014 11:30:26 PM
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@mrdon: Yes amazing indeed. There will be no disk full issues atleast

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Impressive chemistry
mrdon   8/19/2014 9:54:32 PM
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naperlou

I agree. Today's drives seem to be stable in terms of function and storage capability. I'm quite interesting in seeing data as it relates to the liquid substance storing bits of data. Quite and interesting concept in new materials and their ability to store bits and bytes of digital data.

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