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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Actual details, please.
William K.   8/20/2014 11:30:41 AM
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Long ago, way back in the 1980's, there was a product called "stitchwire", which used a CNC plotter style system to glue down a wire connecting pads on a circuit board. The big benefit was that conductors could cross, since the wire was insulated. The wire would be welded to pads to make the connections, and the whole process moved quite rapidly. The real beauty was that it only needed a netlist and a parts layout, which are similar requirements as printed circuit boards. I don't know what became of it, although I suspect that with the development of good autorouters it became a lot less popular. And possibly the high speed data development curtailed it's use.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Actual details, please.
Cabe Atwell   8/19/2014 1:02:58 AM
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When they become available. 

I sure all your worries are addressed.

 

 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Actual details, please.
William K.   8/15/2014 10:11:39 PM
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This does sound like a great idea and a very useful product. But a few details would be very useful as well. Resistance of the traces and glue connections, as well as the variation in resistances, would be quite valuable, since that would determine the suitability for many applications. It should also be possible, if the resistance is quite repeatable, to use it as part of a circuit, thus reducing component count.

Minimum trace width would be another handy spec to get as well.

So how about a few more details about this great product?

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
Cabe Atwell   8/15/2014 4:42:02 AM
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Great! Sent you a comment!

CarlosO
User Rank
Iron
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
CarlosO   8/14/2014 10:47:01 AM
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Hello Cabe,

I couldn't find a way to send you a personal message, but feel free to contact us using the "Comments" form you can find here: http://www.botfactory.co/contact-us

I'll get back to you right away.

 

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
Cabe Atwell   8/14/2014 12:32:55 AM
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Carlos,

 

Contact me directly, I have a few questions!

 

C

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
Nancy Golden   8/13/2014 5:58:29 PM
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Well that sure beats the sharpie, Radio Shack etchant solution and copper boards of my student days. Looks quite handy for simple projects.

CarlosO
User Rank
Iron
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
CarlosO   8/13/2014 1:44:33 PM
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My name is Carlos and I work at BotFactory. I wanted to thank Design News for mentioning us. The support from the community keeps us going.

Regading the comments, I would like to add a couple of things. First, we're working on creating multi-layer boards using additive technologies. This means we would print one layer of conductive ink, then a layer of insulating ink making sure we leave space for vias, then we fill the vias with glue and then we move to the next layer. We're making good progress with this and we hope to have news about it soon.

Second, We're realizing that you can't compare the boards "Squink" produce to a manufactured board, in the same way you can't compare a 3D printed part to a part made using injection molding (specially if youur design needs supports), but the fact that we can crank boards so fast is really amazing and will enable people to do electronics, even when they never thought they would.

Thanks for your comments and interest!

Carlos

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
A well crafted idea for a tool
AnandY   8/13/2014 8:08:14 AM
NO RATINGS
I think that having the Personal Electronic Circuit Board Factory is a very good solution especially for the simple boards. It is also a very good development tool that can be applied in many engineering fields, including rapidly mocking up prototype boards so as to test out the numerous design iterations. The fact that there are many multilayer boards therefore means that the operator should come up with a system that places some subsequent layers so as to come up with a multilayer board.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Rapid Prototype Iterations
William K.   8/12/2014 8:45:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Students and hobbyists will definitely have a lot more resources, but unless the schools are able to teach insight and experience I doubt that any will zoom past us. Understanding inductive and capacitive coupling, and transmission line effects, as well as impedances and voltage drops,  may possiblyy be taught, but not so much as to produce experts.

But the ability to print conductive circuits without first producing a silk-screen is a great benefit. Screen printed circuits are not new, I have seen old circuit boards with both printed conductors and printed resistors, probably made back in the sixties. 

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