HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fly as model for hearing aid
Elizabeth M   8/7/2014 7:55:35 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, indeed, Cabe. Seems to be no end to the inspirations designesr find in nature, and sometimes in the most obscure of animals! (Case in point--who knew about this type of fly, and why would one think to study it for something so specific??)

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fly as model for hearing aid
Cabe Atwell   8/6/2014 6:23:26 PM
NO RATINGS
2mm, not as small as I was expecting.

Nature inspires tech again!

C

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fly as model for hearing aid
Elizabeth M   8/6/2014 4:52:49 AM
NO RATINGS
It's always good to get a personal response from our readers who may be in need of some of the technology I write about, Gorski. I'm gald you think this could be helpful to people who need these devices. My father wears a hearing aid; I will ask him what his experience is with current technology.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Motion Sensor
Elizabeth M   8/6/2014 4:47:44 AM
NO RATINGS
I didn't know that, tekochip. So yeah, this could definitely be applied to motion sensors as well.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Motion Sensor
78RPM   8/5/2014 12:56:53 PM
NO RATINGS
@tekochip, I forgot to mention that when I was a child I wrote to Olive Ann Beach (CEO of Beachcraft) and asked if I could have pictures of some airplanes.  She sent me about a dozen lithograph posters from the marketing department of Beach airplanes in flight.

When I was at Cessna, I sometimes got to ride on the Citation II jet under development.  The front landing gear for a while was a pipe with a caster wheel. I sat down with my feet straddling a bundle of wires. Sometimes they were cabin pressure bump tests that required the plane to climb to 3000 feet by the end of the runway. Once I got to go to nearly 40,000 feet as I recall.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Motion Sensor
78RPM   8/5/2014 12:40:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Cool story. When does your book come out? :-)

There were two kinds of pilots at Cessna. The engineering test pilots were thinking "Lift is a coefficient of drag."  Meanwhile the production test pilots were delivering planes to customers around the country.  They worked maybe 60 hours a week. Finally, they go to the boss and say, "I gotta have some time off."  So on their day off they went to Cessna Employees' Flying Club and checked out a plane for the day.  They thought those engineering guys didn't know how to make this thing perform. Vroooom.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Motion Sensor
tekochip   8/5/2014 12:35:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Ultrasonic motion detection is a time honored technique.  What happens is that you send out an ultrasonic tone, and if the echo is a different frequency, caused by a Doppler shift, then you know that something is moving.
 
The plane is, indeed, my much-loved Cessna 172M.  That's very cool that you worked at Cessna, probably many years after mine rolled off the production floor.  Cessna has made more than 60,000 172s, with 7306 of the 172M, making it the highest production variant.  I'm proud to say that I soloed on N172SS.  Note the vanity tail number, 172SS was Cessna's test unit for the 172M.  The day I soloed I came home to an empty house with nobody to share my joy with.  I had to tell someone, so on a whim I sent an email to Captain Jim Lovell, and he wrote me back right away.


78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Motion Sensor
78RPM   8/5/2014 11:51:23 AM
NO RATINGS
I like your concept Tekochip. If I catch your drift, a burglar alarm with directional sense of sound or motion could surprise the guy (they're all men, right? What's wrong with men?) and shine a flashlight in his face in the night. This would either provoke a pseudo-violent attempt on his part or cause him to flee.  In either case, he'll flee upon awareness of his detection and probable photograph of his clothing and shape being uploaded to the cloud. Meanwhile, outdoor cameras would ... yadda yadda yadda.

I've always enjoyed that picture of you in the plane.  What kind of airplane is that? Is it yours? Many years ago I worked in engineering flight test at Cessna.  That's me on the left with my Great Dane in the truck.

Gorski
User Rank
Platinum
Fly as model for hearing aid
Gorski   8/5/2014 11:03:18 AM
NO RATINGS
As a recent user of hearing aids, I appluad this kind of study. I was shocked at teh cost and life of my hearing aids. In this age of super electronics the cost and life expectancy were very disapointing. I think this research could lead to an affordable, long-lasting hearing aid. Just in time for the deaf boomers to use tehm.

 

Gorski-Prince

Gorski
User Rank
Platinum
Fly as model for hearing aid
Gorski   8/5/2014 11:03:18 AM
NO RATINGS
As a recent user of hearing aids, I appluad this kind of study. I was shocked at teh cost and life of my hearing aids. In this age of super electronics the cost and life expectancy were very disapointing. I think this research could lead to an affordable, long-lasting hearing aid. Just in time for the deaf boomers to use tehm.

 

Gorski-Prince

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Here's a variety of views into the complex production processes at Santa's factory. Happy Holidays!
The Beam Store from Suitable Technologies is managed by remote workers from places as diverse as New York and Sydney, Australia. Employees attend to store visitors through Beam Smart Presence Systems (SPSs) from the company. The systems combine mobility and video conferencing and allow people to communicate directly from a remote location via a screen as well as move around as if they are actually in the room.
Thanks to 3D printing, some custom-made prosthetic limbs, and a Lego set, one lucky dog and a tortoise has learned new tricks.
An MIT research team has invented what they see as a solution to the need for biodegradable 3D-printable materials made from something besides petroleum-based sources: a water-based robotic additive extrusion method that makes objects from biodegradable hydrogel composites.
With Radio Shack on the ropes, let's take a memory trip through the highlights of Radio Shack products.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service