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johnr
User Rank
Iron
Re: There is a simple solution
johnr   7/25/2014 6:34:07 PM
NO RATINGS
For the use in the original article, this should work fine, since having the license plate number included on the sticker.  This would prevent transfering them between vehicles.  (Well, you could still transfer the sticker, but it would be easily detected.)

The company I work for uses the polymer material for the parking stickers we have to have, and they're very easy to remove and reapply.  When we sold one of our cars I removed the parking sticker, but I needed a place to keep it until we bought a replacement car.  So, I stuck the sticker in the corner of a kitchen window.  It ended up being a couple of years before we replace that vehicle, so in the meanwhile I could have legally parked our house in the parking lot at work ... if I somehow could have gotten it there!

makirkwold
User Rank
Iron
Re: Goo Gone
makirkwold   7/25/2014 1:03:01 PM
NO RATINGS
The "moneys" are the agencies who issue these stickers. The stickers are required to be removed every year and yet they have made it impossible (or just very difficult) do so.

Herb Johnson
User Rank
Iron
Re: Goo Gone
Herb Johnson   7/25/2014 12:29:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Automotive stickers are hard to remove, and hard to remove intact, because the agencies who issue them, want to stop people from transferring those stickers to other cars. If they come off in pieces that serves that purpose. By design.

Glues respond to various solvents based on their chemistry. "Goo Gone" uses toluene which is pretty "strong" and will remove paints, has strong odor, and so on. Research "removing stains" or "removing glue" to get more information on both glues and solvents. I'd call doing that either "research" or "homework".

Who are the "monkeys" in this situation?

 

 

jrh_engineer
User Rank
Iron
Re: Tricky stickers
jrh_engineer   7/24/2014 7:40:07 PM
NO RATINGS
I have long dreamed of the day when all stickers would be mandated to have a small logo on them which identified the adhesive type. This would mean that one could reach for the correct solvent first time. I do recognise that the chances of this happening are, to put it mildly, infinitesimal. But, one can always hope...

stn564
User Rank
Bronze
Non-Stick....yeah right
stn564   7/24/2014 6:16:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Best one I had was a non-stick frying pan.  But the label in the middle of the pan stuck to it very well.  I could not get it off and no solvents seemed to work.  I returned it to the shop, and apparently I was not the first one to do so....

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Goo Gone
Greg M. Jung   7/10/2014 9:58:16 AM
NO RATINGS
If you like oranges, the smell is nice also...

Ratsky
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Goo Gone
Ratsky   7/8/2014 3:37:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Me too.  BTW, the primary (maybe only) ingredient is orange oil.  It's a reasonably good general solvent but CAN damage a few types of plastic and latex paint if left too long in contact.  It's gotten fairly pricey, especially considering it's basically a byproduct of the OJ industry!

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Goo Gone
Greg M. Jung   7/4/2014 3:38:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Goo Gone is awesome for removing adhesive residue.  I have had great success in the past using this product too.

LloydP
User Rank
Gold
REmoving decal goo from windows
LloydP   7/3/2014 6:02:15 PM
NO RATINGS
I have successfully used creamy peanut butter to remove sticker residue from glass, bumpers, etc. The peanut oil seems to act as a solvent for the residue. Crunchy peanut butter tends to scratch the paint, though.

RPLaJeunesse
User Rank
Iron
Re: unremovable decals
RPLaJeunesse   7/3/2014 2:07:10 PM
NO RATINGS
I'll go 10 better. I've used WD-40 to do the same job!

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