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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Zero Risk
William K.   6/23/2014 11:55:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Charles, I have seen what the "BSOD" can do to a computer contrllled industrial testing machine, (NOT of my design), and the damage was not minor. 

The comments about updates and hackers are also certainly valid, and they do bring up whole additional realms of reasons to approach the implementation with caution.

My prediction is that if the autonomous vehicles are ever mandated that traffic speeds will be reduced to the point that any collision would not cause injury, since the vehicles will be moving so slowly. While that mode could be safer, I don't expect that many would find it acceptable. The entire exercise will turn out to have been a large waste of money, materials, and time. And only 80% of the folks will realize it.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Zero Risk
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   6/17/2014 7:18:30 PM
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Like 3 dimensional Chess. Gotta love Gene Rodenberry's imagination and vision,,,

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Zero Risk
Charles Murray   6/16/2014 6:51:46 PM
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Good point, William K. Imagine what it would feel like to know your autonomous car is experiencing a BSOD.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Zero Risk
William K.   6/13/2014 10:35:25 PM
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Multiple reasons exist as to why the autonomous car willnever work. Not that they won't be made and sold, but that the promised benefits will never happen. First is the legal problem, since when there is an accident with injury somebody will be at fault, and that would be the producer of the control program that was doing the driving. The auto companies won't accept that, as Charles has already explained. And he is right. The second challenge will pop up even sooner, which is that when an exception situation happens the car will not know how to deal with it and so it will just stop. And we know that exceptions will happen. That will make them very unpopular in a real hurry. Or they will make a wrong choice,with a similar result. The automotive equivalent of the dreadd "blue screen of death" will be te end of the driverless vehicles on public roads.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Zero Risk
Charles Murray   6/11/2014 9:41:21 PM
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The Toyota case is definitely a concern, Cadman-LT, especially when you place it in the context of the autonomous car. Software expert Michael Barr, whose testimony turned one of the recent Toyota trials, had a lot to say on that subject at EE Live this year:

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1395&doc_id=272598

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Zero Risk
Charles Murray   6/11/2014 9:38:00 PM
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I like that rendering, too, Cabe. But when they re-imagined the car, they should have also re-imagined the board game.

Dr Bob
User Rank
Silver
Hmmm!
Dr Bob   6/10/2014 6:21:10 AM
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road bound drones effectively.

program the destination (and delivery date) and you could be miles away.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Zero Risk
Cabe Atwell   6/10/2014 2:42:00 AM
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I like the 1956 rendering of the EV and the family playing a board game while cruising down the highway is just the icing on the cake. 

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Zero Risk
Cadman-LT   6/9/2014 8:53:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I love the fact that the google cars have no steering wheel or pedals. So when it screws up I guess off the cliff you go! No way would I trust a car that I couldn't at least correct at some point. Well, at least it only goes 25mph, you'll probably survive if you have to bail!

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Zero Risk
Cadman-LT   6/9/2014 8:42:04 PM
NO RATINGS
I have a hard time with the whole concept...as much as I like the idea. I just think back, and not long ago, where Toyota had braking and I believe gas pedal issues. I just think it has a very very long way to go before I trust an auto car. If they can't get the basics right....I mean really. And Toyota has been doing it a lot longer than google.

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