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Thanks for the clarity in the presentation.

Peripherals are generally unfriendly. Case in point Big Endian or Little Endian

Interesting reason why constructors and destructors return a type int

Thank you for the presentation

 

thx for ur presentation today

Iron

Thank you for your today presentation

Iron

? Colin what function can be used when we read or write in two memoris with different speed and access time in real time programming?

 

Iron

? Colin, Would you please explain what steps do we need to use before delivering a embedded code when we use some library from device manufacturer to get free any licence or paying extra money while they didn't guarantee for that library but they mentioned it is under their licence?

Iron

? If a string class would be defined in the application, sigcheck function would be written to use that class?

Iron

sometimes Peripheral devices are not generally software friendly and it took much time to be synchronzied with embedded platforms and also there is not any guidline to implement a proper solution and we should test and change software code to get the required result

Iron

@samsul: ARM has done a decent job at making libraries available.  They have standardized on CMSIS and most vendors of ARM parts that I know of have made these libraries avaiable.  However, they're still not always the easiest things to use.  Complicated hardware makes for complicated software -- even (or especially) for predefined libraries.

Iron

Our embedded development group is shrinking in size. More of the work is being done through contracting

Thank you Collin for this outstanding lecture, very useful neat programming

Iron

?My question was answered by your answer to @ElRoy

Iron

Constructor doesn't return anything but initialize the object

Iron

Thanks for the great lecture Colin!

Iron

Yes, it is becomming a big team

 

Iron

@jamal: most NVRAM is similar speed [order of magnitude] to other memory

Blogger

@ALL: Thank you. I will have to leave.

Iron

I mean access time to memory. I used to download the NVRAM on a system before testing and repairing it and used to take about 20 minutes. (old anlog system)

Iron

Thansk for all the questions and comments. I look forward to the last session tomorrow.  I'm off to start my evening now. TTFN

Blogger

@ Charles,  I'm listening to the audio post, and curiously, the audio levels are fine in the recorded version, equal to the sign on.  It's only in the stream that the presentor's levels are soft.  Hope that is helpful to your team.

Iron

@jamal: I am sorry, but I do not understand your question

Blogger

Colin what is the approximate time/KB downloading the novram contents. 

Iron

Got it, thanks.

I'm going to rewrite my nvram class, this is much more intuitive.

@jhelgesen: the type cast is implied. To be really accurate, I should have written:

z = (char)x + (char)y;

I was lazy. :-(

Blogger

Thanks Walls for the lecture

I think the reentrancy code  is really talking about the synchronization in the code. That is the reason we need the lock() and unlock() function to avoid the race condition for the critical data. Once the code run into the lock() and unlock(), it will make the code in sequence.

Iron

Colin, I'm a little confused how the nvramchar class returns it's data.

On slide 9 you have: z = x + y;

There isn't a char() operator, how does it return the values of x & y?

@Ormund: That is the case more often then not, and trying to educate the client about resource allocation for the money is a waste of words.

Iron

@78RPM: You're welcome for whatever I did/said helped you!

Iron

Got one of those annoying customer calls, so I'll have to listen to the audio file later. Thanks for all the hard work, Colin.

@luizcosta: yes - the :: is used in the declaration to link class to member function - the dot is iused to invoke the member function of a particular object [instantiation of a class]

Blogger

Thanks colin, chuck and all involved

Iron

Good night every body... thanks Colin, Chuck

Iron

Thanks to Digi-key and Charles.

Iron

@luizcosta and @Colin. Thank you.

Gold

Thanks Colin. Have a great day. I am signing off now. See tomorrow.

Iron

@Colins

Good lecture. Very pertinet and helpful. Thanks.

Iron

?Are there any other not obvious operators that can be loaded in cplusplus?

Iron

@samdisp06: a single constructor is most common, but multiple constructors can be useful sometimes

Blogger

?@COLIN: Ref. to @78RPM: the double colon - :: - simply links the class name to the member function [if you put the function code outside of the class definition].


In C+, member functions are accessible using the "dot notation" as in objectInstance.memberFunction. Are you referring to something else?

Iron

@ctbrowne, did you mean recursive function?

Iron

@lazar.ivanovic: the overloaded char operator is used whenever you convert from an nvramchar type to a "normal" char - an assignment as I showed is a simple example. Really, on slide 9, I shjould have written:

y = (char) z;

Blogger

We are now in year 2014.... times moving fast. Should it not be the responsibility of the manufacturers to come out with libraries for their peripherals? So, programmers just apply them in his/her apps. At least the libraries up to certain point to ease programmer's life

Iron

?Shouldn't the checksum be at the very end, after the signature?

Iron

@78RPM: the double colon - :: - simply links the class name to the member function [if you put the function code outside of the class definition]

Blogger

@colin Thank you very much

Iron

Thanks again everyone.

?Colin, does it means programmer will usually (at least) provide a few constructors for an class?

Iron

Question: Are peripheral devices generally software friendly?

No, peripheral devices are not generally software friendly.

? Collin can you give some example of using overloaded char operator?
? Is it used only in type casting?
? Does operator overloading affects use of operator inside the class?

@Vic14: in C/C+ a char is just a small [8 bit] integer - I did not want to discuss how big an int is

Blogger

When I design a peripheral I try to make it as software friendyl as possible but sometimes the customer will
 demand that a few pennies be saved on teh hardware not realizing that savings will be wiped out by the additonal sofware development cost.

Iron

The stanard meaning of re-entrant is a program that can call itself, ie n! = n*((n-1)!).  Your use here is normally called serialization.  Your description of what you wanted to do was very clear, but the terminology might cause some confusion when communicating with someone used to the standard definition.

Iron

Thanks Colin and Chuck. Good lecture. See you tomorrow.

Iron

@ElRoy: as I check the signature explicitly I saw no reason to include it in the checksum - it would, however, do no harm to do so

Blogger

@ElRoy, you can just go to the Archived session for today. It is usually available a few minutes after the session.

Gold

? colin excuse my ignorance, I'm confused, in slide 9 why are the variables declared in char? shouldn't they be int. we are dealing with integers aren't we?

Iron

Perhaps use templates to initialize the parameters based on vairiable type?

Are peripheral devices generally software friendly? Not always

Iron

@mcurry: I did not use the string class for 2 reasons. First when this code was first written, this class was not in widespread use. Second, I wanted as much of this code to be "C programmer friendly" as possible

Blogger

Thanks, Colin.  I'll have to listen to this one again. Lots of new material for me. 

@ Charles, still not good on the audio levels.  The "laptop Radio" is loud, but have to turn the gain way up for you and Colin.

Iron

? @Colin: i noticed that the checksum was located before the signature field. Why was that? it would seem prudent to include the signature data field in the checksum by putting the checksum after all written data, that way you would know that the written signature was what you thought it was.

Iron

@marstan: yes, you could do that, but inheritance is probably neater and also ultimately equivalent

Blogger

why not:

return !strcmp(&base[size-6], "NVRAM");

strcmo returns an int type 0 0r 1

Iron

@ElRoy: I am sorry, but I do not have the facility to reactivate the audio to do this review. If I am able/permitted, I will repeat that at the very end of tomorrow's session

Blogger

?@Are peripheral devices generally "software friendly"? I tend to believe that low level designers have fun in trying to "save the world" and solve problems long term. However, some companies may put too much effort in sticking to the release dates and other commercial pressures and continue for decades to wirte buggy code even at the lowest level.

Iron

Thanks Colin Walls, Charles Murray & Digi-Key !

Iron

?Colin - What about using a separate nvram class to hold the baseaddr and size and to do the initialization?  You could then pass the nvram object to the nvramchar constructors to set up the individual variables.

Iron

Thanks Colin, a lot to review today (at least for me!)

Iron

?@Colin Why use strcmp() instead using C++ string class?  String class allows "normal" comparison operators.

Iron

@luizcosta: my point was that these slides show different ways to write the same code - one is, IMHO, much clearer than the other. Both would result in identical binary code.

Blogger

I think the peripherals are not software friendly today yet.

Iron

?? Colin, I have never understood the meaning of the double colon :: as in slides 20,21, and 23-25.

Gold

Thanks again all of you at the weblog talk...

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles!

Iron

Thanks Colin and Chuck. Thanks everyone.

If your audio went out, try FireFox or Chrome.  What I do is start on IE which is my default, but when the audio goes out, I go to FireFox.

Iron

? Colin: could you repeat the question review? more than one of us had audio go away just as you were starting.

Iron

?Hi Colin, on what processor (Freescale...etc) are you programming in C+  

Iron

More clarification of things I should have known.

Thanks

Iron

Thanks Colin, Chuck, and Digi-Key

Definitely one of the best seminar series!!

Iron

? I understand no return type is an "oversight", but when would a constructor/destructor return type add value?  (I'm just not that familiar with all the ins and outs of C+ yet.)

Iron

Thank you again Colin and Charles.

Iron

see you all tomorrow

Iron

Thank you Colin and Charles. Have a great day

Iron

very informative..thanks

Iron

Thank you Colin and Charles

Thank you Charles and Colin

thanks Colin and Chuck!

 

Iron

?Will you comment on file system support in NVRAM / EEPROM

Iron

@COLIN: Sorry it was not clear the purpose of the slides 32, 33. Did you mean to explain syntax situations that work even though the return type was innadequate?

Iron

Thanks, Colin, Digi_key, et.tal.

Iron

Thank you for a good lecture.

Iron

OK.  I'm here and ready for any questions that you may have.

Blogger

Thank you Colin, Charles, and Digi-Key

Gold

Thank you Digikey and Colin!

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles.

Iron

Thanks again Colin and Chuck

Iron

Thank you Colin!

Iron

Peripherials are quite friendly, they always buy a round at the pub

Iron

thank you Colin and Charles

Iron

Thanks Colin and Chuck

 

Iron

Thank you and see you tomorrow.

Iron

Thanks Colin & Digi-Key!

Iron

Audio stopped! missed Colin question review!

Iron

Thank you Colin and Charles.

Iron

Hardware is not very software friendly.

Iron

Well documented is a rarity unfortunately

Iron

Thanks Colin and Chuck...

Iron

Very intersting story about no return on constructors

Iron

Have a nice day everyone!

Iron

Audio player stopped

 

Iron

Generally Peripherials are not software friendly.

The audio player stopped and disappeared.

I think Hardware devices are generally SW friendly IF you know how they work and they are well documented.

Iron

Wait.  A ctor returns a pointer to the tupe constructed.  Tjhey have a type but the programmer cannot code a type.

Iron

Question review: Why not:       return !strcmp (&base [size -6], "NVRAM") ;

Blogger

I guess not but I can eventually interface with them as desired...

Iron

I think they are getting better.  i.e. hard drives.  Some printers are.  NVRAM is not.  Real Time Clocks are usually not. 

 

Iron

not software friendly

Iron

Most peropherals are NOT SW friendly

 

Iron

Peripheral are generally not user friendly at all.  Hardware engineer try to pak all sorts of stuff in the smallest gates.

Iron

Most of the times: No!

Iron

peripheral devices are not s/w friendly. i do understand hardware, so not much of a problem:-)

Iron

In general, I find peripherals "friendly" when they only do 1 funciton.  When they are flexible, they become "unfriendly".

Iron

often hw is designed without consulting sw desires

Iron

Component wise, usually.  System wise, no.

Iron

peripherals SW freindly?  Traditionally no, but getting better, for example TI's MSP430 line

Iron

Peripherials are generally NOT sw friendly

Iron

>>> Are peripheral devices generally software friendly?<<<

Just the opposite

Iron

peripheral devices are generally not software friendly, require proper init, timing and access control

Iron

hadware engineers would like to eliminate software engineers in my experience in the past.  of course reality is that it has gone the other way.

Blogger

depends a lot of the tools but mostly not

Iron

[4] it is a state of mind, friend or foe!

Iron

Are peripheral devices generally "software friendly"?

They are software nutreal.

Iron

peripheral registers map usually maps fine to a structure of members of size fitting a natural CPU type.

Iron

Peripheral programming is supposed to be user abusive. :-)

Iron

? Why don't you add a func like write(char data, int addr) instead of using constructor?

Iron

Question review: What return type does a constructor or destructor have?

Blogger

[4] That depends on the design of the peripheral

Iron

periphials tend to be uniquie access, so hard to access

Bronze

Periferal devices are not software friendly.

Iron

I find them mostly friendly... there are exceptions.

Iron

No, HW devices are rarely "software friendly," alas.

 

I do not think the hardware peripheral registers are friendly for software programmer.

 

Iron

peripheral devices are typically software un-friendly...

Iron

It depends on the device, but most of them are software friendly.

Iron

?: depends on how many classes you want to create :-) ... also, depends on how consistent/logically the peripheral was laid out

Iron

Only some devices are software friendly

Iron

I wouldn't say peripheral devices are generally "software friendly"

Iron

some yes....others not

Iron

Depends on the the hw designers :-)

Iron

Jumping ahead just a bit peripheral devices are not software friendly. Some would even say peripheral device designers hate software engineers.

 

Iron

No they absolutely are not software friendsly!

Iron

Not software friendly

Iron

not software friendly. need functions to simplify

Gold

I think peripheral devices are generally software friendly.

Iron

In general, they aren't software friendly, but getting better.

Most peripherals are not Software friendly, but some manufacturers are better than others.

Iron

Peripheral - Almost never s/w friendly.

Iron

Not always.  Depends on the HW designer.

Iron

Peripherals can be "friendly" once helper routines are in place.

Iron

@Jott

True; missed that without the whole thing in front me and ping-ponging around the slides and web page.  Thanks.

Iron

Most peripheral devices are not typically software "friendly".

Iron

No, peripheral devices are NOT generally software friendly.

 

friendly.. depends but typically not

Iron

Question: Are peripheral devices generally software friendly?

Blogger

[4] Generally no as they need to minimize the Hardware interface

Iron

no..usually just a bunch of registers.

Iron

@gbabecki the private variables are local to object, but sigcheck() and checksum() access the nvram

Iron

!sigcheck() in if (!sigcheck()|| checksum() != base[size-7])is expectrd to return boolean

Iron

What return type does a constructor or destructor have?

Do not have return type.

Iron

? Slide 23:  should not the lock() preceed the setting of the private variables?

Iron

How big is your embedded software development team? Is it growing?

Small with 2 on R&D team.

Iron

Does the program care if function is interrupted?

Iron

strcmp returns zero if strings equal or a signed integer if not.  This might mess up the code that follows the call to sigcheck.

Iron

? I seem to remember, from my coursework on compilers, that function arguments tend to end up on the stack and we have discussed allocated memory ends up on the heap.  We discussed fragmentation as a problem with OO design since new calls malloc which is a heap operation and then free can fragment memory.  The method of addressing that is with binned heap segments which has some obvious memory inefficiences.  Isn't use of the stack more memory efficient?  It seems like the C+ alternative to C would have to be very carefully written with a conservative and thoughtful use of class variables.  C naturally pushes code in that direction.  Are there any design guidelines that push a C design in that same direction?

Iron

What to watch is that some (possibly all) C+ implementations have a numerical representation for true and false -- where Zero (0) is false -- so maybe...

 

Iron

Question: Why not:       return !strcmp (&base [size -6], "NVRAM") ;
I guess due to C+ 11 standard: if the compiler isn't following this standard will not work for negative return values

Iron

How big is your embedded software development team? Is it growing?


One part timer.

Iron

Question: What return type does a constructor or destructor have?

No return type.

debugging purposes

Iron

I believe the way you did it more readable.

Iron

why return true. true/false is yes/no. strcmp returns signed integers

Iron

return (!((strcmp(&base[size-6], "NVRAM")));

Iron

readability/supportability

Iron

?Why use strcmp() instead using C++ string class?

Iron

@ALL: Not too late this afternoon. Greetings!

Iron

Constructors and destructors do not have return types, constructeur initialise and destructor i~ s the complement

Iron

Could it return an error code instead of a boolean?

Why not:       return !strcmp (&base [size -6], "NVRAM") ;

because of the return type of strcmp.

Iron

THe desire is for explicit TRUE or FALSE as determined by the compiler.

Iron

data mismatch not a boolean

 

Iron

To make it readable.

Iron

Easier to debug...

 

Iron

applying `!` on int return type is calling for troubles.

Iron

?: not equivalent statements

Iron

not as readable, on the other hand why return true or false, which is bool, when you want to return an int, and should return 0 or 1?

Iron

To get the enum vlaue for true or false

Iron

Q2: cannot return private directly to a calling function. have to  test within the private function

Iron

Return Val of strcomp: not a boolean...

Iron

strcmp() returns 3 different values depending on comparison result, not just true or false

Iron

Much more readable returning true or false

strcmp returns and integer

Iron

Constructors and destructors do not have return types.

?3  It is easier to read that way.

Iron

Because the longer version is easier to understand.

Iron

To make it more readable.

Iron

strmp return 0, 1, or -1 dependending on result of comparison

Iron

to avoid random mistake

Iron

strcmp returns 0 if equal, but diff values if >, <

Iron

[3] strcmp returns an int and ! is a boolean operator
what would !(-1) evaluate to

Could do:
return (strcmp (&base[size-6], "NVRAM") == 0);

Iron

Yes, audio ahs been breaking up here also.

Iron

NO return value. AFAIK

Iron

because the random data in the NVRAM may not be NULL terminated

Iron

strcmp does not return a boolean value.

Iron

?slide 15 does the offset need to be adjusted for different types used i.e float, double etc.?

Iron

I believe constructor return the object type and destructors are void.

Iron

?shouldn't the nvramchar constructor check the input parameters?

 

strcmp() returns "0" if match, not "true" or "false".

Iron

Audio seems to be breaking up anyone else having this problem?

Iron

Question: Why not:       return !strcmp (&base [size -6], "NVRAM") ;

Blogger

?? slide 15 any benefit in speed or code size if constructor is written as:

nvramchar::nvramchar(int offset, unsigned baseaddress, int totalsize) :
base ((char *)baseaddress),
size (totalsize),
data (base + offset)

{
if (!sigcheck() || checksum() != base[size-7])
init();
}

Iron

destructors don't return a type.  Not sure about construtors; they either return nothing or they return an instantiated object of the specified class type.

Iron

actually constructors implicitly return an instance of the class itself.

Iron

no return value I believe

Constructors and destructors do not have return types nor can they return values.

Iron

Neither constructor or destructor have a return type.

Iron

Constructor returns type of its class.

Destructor returns void.

Iron

Do not have any return value

Iron

The constructors and destructors do not return anything.

Iron

it doesn't return any type

Iron

They can't have a return type, no data return, only failure is to allocation, can have void.

Iron

constructors and destructors return void 

Iron

return type : do not know ; int by default ?

Iron

construtor returns a pointer to the class.

unsure of the return of the destructor

 

I don't know.  I though it was void.

Iron

What return type does a constructor or destructor have?


none

Iron

Don't really know, guessing void.

Iron

Constructor: Return Type is "Nothing". Unless you count the pointer to the function... ;-)

Iron

A constructor or destructor doesn't have any return type

 

Iron

Does it default to int like C does?

Bronze

No return value from a constructor or destructor

Iron

The return type is the class.

Iron

Return type is char

Iron

RE: 14 I do not know

Iron

No return at all

Iron

Don't know what type of return

Iron

no return value from constructor/destructor

Iron

No return type for constructor /destructor

Iron

a constructor or destructor has no return type, they are not "called" as a function.

Iron

there is no return type.

Iron

Constructors and destructors return no value.

Iron

constructor does not return anything

Iron

Constructors/destructors have no return values

 

Iron

[2] constructors and destructors do not have return values

Iron

Constructors/Destructors do not have a "return" type.

Iron

Hi from Lawrence MA.

Answers to first set of questions: team size : 4 on site, 2 off; slowly growing. The sustaining project mostly relies on one.

Iron

Question: What return type does a constructor or destructor have?

Blogger

Constructor/Destructor Return Type -  No return type.

Iron

I am in the learning phase.

Iron

How big is you embedded software development team? Is it growing?

 

2, Yes

Iron

@DaveWR: yes, I saw it, that conclusion make my day :))

Iron

Team size is only 1 wish it was growing.

 

Iron

greetings frin Midalnd TX sorry late

Iron

@bobybacs -- see my previous comment about "Now winning all the arguments" on a team of one ;-)

Iron

Question: How big is you embedded software development team? Is it growing?

By now, a team of one. Surely it will grow in the future.

@naperlou: No Zed is Z  -- it's Americans who are confused.

Iron

@DaveWR: and how was it to manage such a team ?

Iron

Is "zed" something like z?

Blogger

joining late today

Iron

I am the only software engineer in my team containing EE and ME and management types

Iron

I should mention that I used to have a team of about 40 programmers, scientists and engineers.... that can be interesting.

Iron

maybe we should group small teams to create a bigger one :)

Iron

No embedded software development team

Iron

I guess Arduino works that way in some way or another... with lots of libraries

Iron

My current software development team is me.  IN the past I have managed teams of 2 to 8 engineers.

Iron

Dev team is one member currently -- That way I win all the arguments!

Iron

2 in-house, others on contract, depending on the projet.

If effort takes 2 F/W engineers 1 year, then 4 F/W engineers will take 2 years

Iron

Just 2 people right now.  It goes up and down. 

Iron

8 team members at the moment

Iron

Small SW team, growing with the business. 1-3, with some more brought in on contract.

we have > 100 embedded software engineers, ~ 4 or 5 on a team

Iron

two team member, we are a freelancer team, I'm the firmware developer and the other doing the hardware. Of course we want to expand our team

Iron

We have 8 people in our software dept

I am doing it alone...

Iron

6 + 1 contractor.  Has grown from 3 to 7 in the past 3 years.

Iron

I am HW, Collin...  ;-)

Depends on projects / companies I've been with ; from 1 person to 20+

Iron

My team consists of me for the foreseeable future...

Iron

myself currently

 

Iron

Currently I'm an independent consultant/professional electronics engineer.

Only me at the moment

Iron

me, and 1-5 other engineers, depending on product complexity, size, and time to market

sorry, probably more like 10-20 of those are embedded only, the rest software

Iron

Just me at this point.

Me, myself, and I.  8^)

Iron

we are 4. growing (depends on projects)..right now no.

Iron

working  with 12 software 6 hardware 5 in QA as apart of the Enginnering team

 

Iron

5 realtime embedded developers + 2 Linux embedded and growing

We have embedded teams long established in other parts of the company, but in our division it is in its infancy.  3 EE's and a couple of mobile app programmers for now.

Iron

My component software developement team consists of one person, then we have one other software programmer for the systems.

Iron

one member and not currently growing.

Iron

3 - not growing in NJ!!

Iron

[1] a team of 5 resident but contractors are always working on the side.

 

Iron

2 or 3 per project and growing

Iron

Total of 1 - 3 folks do software engineering along w/ hardware and management, not growing

Iron

3 full time plus 2 or 3 coop positions, would like more!

Iron

Not big, three people

Iron

We have up to 4 people in our software dev team.

Iron

I'm One guy compagny!

Iron

I'm flying solo.

 

Iron

2 permanent, 2 contract

Iron

Our team is in 3 countries so I really don't know how large it is.  However, it is constantly growing.

Iron

Yes the SW team is growing. 

 

Team of 1 - no additions in the near future

Iron

3 people.  No it is not growing..

Iron

?: 50-100+, not sure about growth

Iron

At this time, one, but it has varied.

Iron

There are hundreds and it is growing.

Iron

Four personnel for embedded.  It is not growing.

Iron

Our team consists of two members.

Iron

2 of us...  Growing?  Maybe.

Iron

3 people may grow by one. But have worked with teams as large as several hundred at Motorola working on cell phone.

Iron

My embedded SW development team is a force of two and holding steady...

Iron

we have 3 Firmware people and 15 software people.

Iron

small team, 4 very multi-talented, not growing.

Iron

Small (7) and NOT growing

Iron

Team is pretty big and growing, about 1000 now

Iron

one to three.  this is a consultancy.

Blogger

Just me and the client

Iron

team has 2 members

Iron

little or no teamwork yet, a few collaberations including this one.

Iron

5 R&D engineers, I imagine its gonna grow sooner or later

3 FTE's and growing...

Iron

[1] last job had 8 on the team

Iron

I am a team of one.

Iron

Currently a "team of one."

Iron

Team is 3, growing

 

Iron

4 people and growing.

Iron

Embedded Team Size - Typically 5 - 6 engineers per project with varying number of support personnel.
Growing - Economics stopped growth.

Iron

team of four, looking out to add a fifth one.

Iron

Question: How big is you embedded software development team? Is it growing?

Blogger

Hello from Albuquerque.

Iron

The team I am on has 3 members.  We have other teams in different locations that are much bigger.  Some teams are growing.

Iron

IR embedded software development is scattered at different departments

Iron

Hello from Dallas. I'm ready to start...

Iron

Hello from Upstate NY!

 

Iron

Welcome back Colin.

Iron

Hello from Montreal, QC

Iron

Hello from Los Angeles

Iron

Good morning from Calgart

Hi, audio is alive again.

Iron

Good morning everyone

Iron

Hi all -Audio is live! If you don't see the audio bar at the top of the screen, please refresh your browser. It may take a couple tries. When you see the audio bar, if it doesn't start automatically, hit the play button. If you experience audio interruptions and are using IE, try using FF or Chrome as your browser. Many people experience issues with IE. Also, make sure your flash player is updated with the current version. Some companies block live audio streams, so if that is the case for your company, the class will be archived on this page immediately following the class and you can listen then. People don't experience any issues with the audio for the archived version.

Hello from Greensboro NC

Iron

Hello from NY.

 

Iron

Good day, all...

Iron

Hello all from Montreal, Quebec

Iron

Hello from Michigan

 

Iron

Hello from Seattle!

Iron

Good afternoon from Rockville, MD.

Iron

Greetings from Merlin, OR

Hello from Albuquerque.

Iron

Greetings from Frostbite Falls

Hello from Longmont, CO

Iron

Hello from Delavan, WI.

Iron

Hello from Philippines.

Hello everyone. Welcome or welcome back. Thanks for all the feedback/interaction since yesterday's session. We will begin the lecture at the top of the hour and I plan to be back here to address any questions straight afterwards.

Blogger

Greetings from Vermont

Iron

Good afternoon from hot south Florida.

Hello from Manizales, Colombia.

hello from Mishawaka

Iron

hello all from Edmonton, Alberta.

Iron

hi from Baltimore, md.

Iron

And hello from sunny Shelton, Washington

Iron

Hi from Hudson's Hope BC

Iron

hello everyone from Timisoara

Iron

Hello from sunny Montana

Gold

You are eligible to earn IEEE Professional Development Hours by attending these courses and participating in the chat function. Additionally, we are no longer using the points system, offering "graduation", or giving grades. The IEEE hours are taking the place of that. There are some important things for you to know about earning the hours. The most important ones are that you need to attend these courses live, you need to attend a minimum of two of them per semester, you need to fill out a course evaluation form within 2 weeks of the end of the class, you need to attend 4 out of the 5 classes per course, and you need to participate in the chat function every day you attend. Please click on the link at the top of this page that says "How do I earn IEEE professional development hours" to read all of these important details and more.

Blogger

Hello from Thornville, Ohio

Iron

Hello from Milwaukee.

 

Iron

Hello from Pittsburg

Iron

Hello everybody from Valladolid - Spain

Iron

Its been great. I really appreciated this classes. Thanks to Digi-key.

Iron

Hi Colin and Charles. How are you?

Iron

Hi from Valladolid, Spain; España

Iron

Hi from Summerville, SC. How's everyone doing?

Iron

Please join our Digi-Key Continuing Education Center LinkedIn Group at http://linkd.in/yoNGeY and be sure to follow @designnews and @DigiKeyCEC on Twitter for the latest class information. We encourage you to tweet about today's class using #DigiKeyCEC.

Blogger

Boy! already logged in somehow!

Iron

Good case example. Nonvol memory can be tricky. I use FRAM which doesn't have the timing and wear leveling problems.

good afternoon, from Detroit, Michigan

The streaming audio player will appear at the top of this web page when the show starts at 2 PM Eastern time today. If the audio doesn't start automatically, click on the play button to start it. Note however, that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts, the audio bar doesn't appear or you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser. If that doesn't work, try using Firefox or Google Chrome as your browser. Some users experience audio interruptions with IE. Also, make sure your flash player is updated with the current version. If that doesn't work, your company is likely blocking the live stream. The class will be archived immediately following our live taping and you will be able to listen to it then. You shouldn't experience any problems with the audio when listening on-demand.

Blogger

Greetings from Kansas

Iron

Hi all.  On the way to 70 degF and sunny today in Minneapolis.

Iron

Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.

Blogger

Hello from sunny SE Lake Simcoe Ontario Canada.

Iron

Hello from Tomball, TEXAS!

Iron

Signign in from COS.

Iron

Hellloooo from guadalajara MX

Just downloaded today's slides. See you at 2pm EDT.

Iron

Hello from Chicago

Iron

Greetings from Scottsdale

Iron


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