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Thank you Colin, Have a great day

Iron

@cpu :  yes, it took me that long to read from bottom - up !

Thanks for asking Collin !  ;-)

Iron
@Colin: Thanks Colin, that extra time answer came as a reward - unexpected and appreciated.
Iron

@StephT, I asked something similar. Scroll down for my questions/answers about constructors, destructors.

Iron

? @ Colin Walls ; basic question : what are a constructor and a destructor ?

Iron
@All: thanks everyone to make this experience instructive and delightful.
Iron

@luizcosta: [just before I go] there is only one copy of the code for each class regardless of how many instantiations there are

Blogger

Thank you Colin.

 

Iron
?@Colin: I learned that Objective C objects are not complete copies of the class object. In other words, only the data and certain static structures are independent for each instance of a class. The methods are kept in a central location for all objects to use. Is there any C+ implementation for embedded systems that use this feature?
Iron

@jErhPN2 we handle lots of cases where the pointer is passed to the HMI layer, we designed it such a way that the HMI calls delete on that paritcular object to free up the memory

Iron

Thank you Colin and Chuck.

Iron

I have to sign out now, as my evening is drawing in. Look forward to talking with you all tomorrow. TTFN

Blogger

@samdisp06, @jErhPN2: there are no reference counts in C+ - it would not be possible

Blogger

samdisp06: I've never heard of a reference count except for garbage collection managed languages such as VB.NET or CSharp.

Iron

@luizcosta:

Right in that page I provided the link:

"The definition of the TIOBE index can be found here."

Have a good one.

Iron

@syakovac: the same way as you would with C - it is not easy. A possibility is to build prototype code and look at th elinker map.

Blogger

@jErhPN2, I think the object will have a reference count. If the object goes out of scope, the desctructor will be called. It does not matter it is in the same function or not.

Iron

How do you figure out how much memory you will need in the HW if you intend to use C+ ?

Iron

jErhPN2: a reference could exist to an object that has gone out of scope - that is an error, just like it is in C

Blogger
@oly01: tkx for the fdbk on the stats.
Iron

I'm starting very late but the languages I am using presently are: C+ , C, assembly

Iron

Signing out now.

Thanks Colin. Looking forward to tomorrow's lecture.

Iron

@Colin

Scope Example: The Cpp new operator is used to instantiate an object and it allocates resources. The pointer to this object can then be passed outside of the method and the method returns. The compiler does not automatically delete the object when the method returns because a reference to it exists outside of the method context.

Iron

@cpu: yes you call it just like that - it is public by default [in a struct]

Blogger

@luizcosta: >>>@olyh01: Do you know if that stat considers lines of code written, or sales volume of embedded systems in the market in the same period?<<<

I don't remember the detail. I need to pour over their site to find out.

 
Iron

? Colin In that example of page 15, if we want to call the fun1 function from some place in our code, do we call it using "astruct.fun1(arg)"? And must the fun1() functionbe declared public in order for it to be called from all other places in the code?

Iron

@olyh01: yes, I became aware more recent that this language name had been used

Blogger

@luizcosta: there are no hard and fast rules - I was just expressing a personal preference, which I think is most readable

Blogger

@Colin:

You alluded to today's topic as being C+ (Slide 15).

Actually that exact names has been used:
"http://libcello.org/documentation/hacking". And that's the point I brought up Tiobe's programming language Index (The latest is May 2014)

Iron
?@Colin: I thought that name conventions for all OO languages of type TheOffSwitch was reserved to class and class object naming this last for Objective C.
Iron

@jErhPN2: can you give an example of a situation when an object going out of scope is unclear?

Blogger

@cghaba: there are libraries, though some care is needed to sleect those that makes sense in an embedded context

Blogger

Using the constructor and destructor for allocation and deallocation respectively is still not a guarantee for avoiding memory leaks. The destructor is only called when the compiler can determine if the object has gone out of scope. There are numerous cases where the compiler cannot guarantee the object is out of scope and therefore does not call the destructor leaving it up to the coder's expertise to call the destructor using the delete operator.

Iron

@samdisp06: sorry, no - that will not be covered in this course

Blogger

?Does these days writing cplusplus code for embedded applications require only the knowledge of cplusplus language or we have to know there are some useful libraries that can ease our work?

Iron

@luizcosta: we will look at that tomorrow - hopefully all will be clear

Blogger

Will you talk about TDD (test driven) in C+ ?

Iron
?@Colin: What kind of garbage collection do the embedded OSs in the market today use to deal with memory management for C+ produced code?
Iron

@cghaba: there are a number of coding styles around, which depend somewhat on the type of application. I favor object names like this: TheOffSwitch

Blogger

in cpp, class & struct are largely similar, except for scope (classes: private; struct: public)

Iron

C+ compiler usually emits code for parameterless constructor if no other constructors are present. Otherwise, the parameterless constructor needs to be explicitly defined. The C compiler also emits copy constructor and assignment operator?

Iron

?Colin, can you suggest a good coding convention/style (including name convention)?

Iron

@Embedded101: yes

Blogger

@cpu: the constructor and destructor can contain anything the programmer wants. They are usually used for resource allocation. You will see examples in the coming days.

Blogger
@olyh01: Do you know if that stat considers lines of code written, or sales volume of embedded systems in the market in the same period?
Iron

@

 

Thx, considering use of constructor and destructor.

Iron

Will you cover overloading of new and delete to reduce memory leaks and the likelyhood of using an errant pointer?

@mem For C# on the other hand; struct and class denote value-type and reference-type and a whole host of differences to follow.

Iron

? Colin What kind of code is contained in the constructor and destructor? Does the programmer write the bodies of the constructor and destructor functions? (Or are they somehow provided by the commpiler?)

Iron

@ rfindley :
SlickEdit is (as they claim) "the world's most powerful editor".

How would you compare it to UltraEdit ?

 

Iron

@olyh01: I don't think that C is going away any time soon

Blogger
@Jamal: If I get your question on memory and struct there is no difference between struct and class in terms of memory usage in C or C+ .
Iron

samdisp06: we will talk about memory allocation tomorrow

Blogger

struct and class are on the stack if instantiated without new operator; otherwise, heap

Iron

Soneone asked earlier about the outlook of C.

C still sits on top of programming language practice accroding to "2014 Tiobe Programming Index"
rsshttp://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html

 

 

Iron

As I know, we use struct that usually is in the stack. The class object initialize with new() operator so it may allocate in the heap instead of stack, right?

Iron

Thanks Walls and Murray for interedting lecture.

@automaticbeetle: yes - by default they are private/public respectively

Blogger

@emertp: I would not suggest necessarily moving all projects to C+ - only those that would benefit from its capabilities [i.e. bigger ones]

Blogger

@jhelgeesn: I think the eval is the same for the week and we only fill it in once.

Iron

Question: What is the difference between a class and a struct in C+ ?

The difference is: members of a class are private, but members of a strut are public.

@cpu - correct , one eval for entire week after all is over.

Iron

@Colin - OK I see - so basically if embedding in "narrow" spaces use C, otherwise C+ if bigger apps. Thanks!

Iron

@samdisap06: external libraries would normally have a C+ or "C compatible" version available nowadays - otherwise you woul dneed to use extern "C"

Blogger

Thanks again everyone.

@ evaluation form - we are asked to evaluate the course only after it ends (day 5), aren't we?

Iron

@jhelgesen - There is just one eval for the entire week.

Iron

@wsequeira: in C+ keeping code size down requires exactly the same measures as in C. However, th ereal benefits of C come along with bigger applications

Blogger

Collin If I understand it, it is better to use struct to free memory?

Iron

Usually many vendor's library is in C. Does it mean we will heavily use extern c if we write c+ code in the project? What if the library is not a clean C code?

Iron

The link to the evaluation form is still pointed to yesterday's eval.

Does anyone have the link to today's form?

@Colin yes, thanks. So, what kind of code is contained in the constructor and destructor? Does the programmer write the bodies of those functions?

Iron

thx for the presentation today

Iron

@jErhPN2: I would say that if some assembly is really needed, hiding it in a well designed class would be an excellent idea

Blogger

@cpu: OK  mystruct is the type of the class - struct mystruct.  The 2 member functions have variations of that name to indicate that they are constructor and destructor. At the bottom I declare an instance of mystruct called astruct. Any clearer?

Blogger

@cpu  The mystruct() and ~mystruct() elements are the constructor and destructor functions for the struct.  A struct is the same as a class in C+ except for the default member access control (public vs private).

Iron
@All: sorry for being so late. Traffic in Detroit is terrible w/ new HW construction.
Iron

¿What is your opinion of encapsulating assembly code within a C+ class/struct? Assuming you can determine the name mangled linkage to apply to your C class member function written in assembly.

Iron

@ElRoy: yes, I will be discussing inheritance and giving examples later

Blogger

?Colin I understand about themissing semicolon. I was asking about use of the name mystruct for multiple apparently different elements in the struct.

Iron

@samdisp06: a multiple declaration would be like this:

 

int x;

int y;

int x;

 

Nothing clever

Blogger

@78RPM: on slide 6 that is just a function prototype - I have given no indication what th efunction actually does [as that is not relevant at this point]

Blogger

? Colin: One observable obstacle to using OO tools such as C+ seems to be the structure of objects, i.e. defining correct parent objects that child objects can be derived from and inherit useful traits. Are you going to be discussion OO in this lecture series relative to object selection?

Iron

? What is the best approach when code has to be minimal?  Ie. not much memory space.

Iron

Could you give an example for multiple declaration for a variable?

Iron

Hi Colin, on slide 7, could you elaborate a little bit what do you mean "Enumated types are taken seriously"?

@cpu: on slide 15 there should be ";" after "}"  My bad.

Blogger

Hi Colin, with the migration of C to C+ , what is your opinion on C on few years down the road?

 

?? @Colin, on slide 6 in the gray box. What does the line "int fun(float);" do?  Does it take a floating point number subsequently used and truncate the value behind the decimal point?

Gold

Thanks Colin, Chuck, and all involved

Iron

thanks -- see you tomorrow.

Iron

I want my two minutes!  Just kidding, no need to stretch it out longer than material needs.

Iron

SChancey: accessing hardware will be talked about on Thurs/Fri

Blogger

Thanks Colin and Charles.

Iron

@Curtis: no, there is nothing that I would describe as hands-on, except that almost all of the code of the case study is actually usable

Blogger

Where is the Programming Embedded Systems in C+ ? are we brushing over C and C programming?

Iron

I dont mind more than 30 mins

Iron

?Colin, on slide 15, please explain again your point of using mystruct as a struct declaration, and the same name mystruct as a function. What are you trying to show there? And what is the operation peformed by ~mystruct()?

struct mystruct

{

   int var1;

   ...

   void fun1(int);

   ...

   mystruct();

   ~mystruct();

}

 mystruct astruct;

Iron

Conceptually similar. After all what is data and code but bits.

Iron

?How about teaching the first language for embedded computing, show it be C or C+ ?

Iron

?do you recomend moving all C code to C plusplus, or just new projects, keeping an ear to the maintenance groups inputs?

Iron

So, is the effort to migrate legacy embedded C code to C+ really worth the investment?  I can envision some managers balking at my "cavalier" ROI claim.

Iron

Thank you. You made me think on the struct vs class question.

 

Iron

?will you be commenting on C+ I/O support (GPIO, UART, ADC, I2C, SPI, etc.) vs C

Iron

Thanks Collin and Charles.  Thanks everyone.

Thanks Colin, Chuck, and Digi-Key!

Iron

Colin,  28 minutes is close enough!

Iron

@jhunley: well spotted! Yes, I left of a darned semi-colon - makes me think Python is quite cool

Blogger

Thanks Colin, see all tomorrow.

Iron

I guess I missed it but you are stating that we can reuse our C embedded code in a C+ compiler correct?

Iron

Thanks Colin for this excellent presentation.

Iron

OK, will try FireFox tomorrow.  Thanks!

Iron

Thanks Colin, great lecture.

?Any hands-on case study in this class?

Iron

Syntax error on slide 15 was missing semi-colon after the struct declaration. Or, superfluous type declaration of the following variable of that type.

Iron

I am supposed to talk for 30 mins, but I think I only did 28 today. :-(

Blogger

Thank you Colin and Charles.

Iron

Thanks again, Colin and Chuck.

Iron

Huge Thanks Collin

 

THanks for another great session!

Iron

Good session. Thanks, Colin!

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles

... listen tomorrow

Iron

I will listen to the end on the archive

Iron

Thanks Colin, Charles et al.

Iron

@Pat Mc - Try Firefox or Chrome. I could not get the audio to work in IE.

Thanks Colin, DN and Digi-Key!

Iron

Thanks.  I looked up the differences between a class and a struct.

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles.

Iron

Syntax error in slide 15 was a missing semicolon after the struct declaration.

Iron

Thanks Collin, Chuck, Digi-key, Et. Tal.

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles

Iron

Thank you Mr Colin..thank you so much..

 

Iron

See you all tomorrow.

Iron

Thanks Colin and Digikey!

Iron

@JimmyD, you're welcome.

Iron

Thanks Colin and Charles.

Iron

Thank you Collin and Chuck

Iron

thanks!  learned something today as well.

OK, I am here and ready for questions

Blogger

Thanks Colin and Chuck.

Iron

Thank you Colin and Charles.

Iron

short today but good.

Iron

Huge thanks Colin, Chuck, and Digi-Key

Iron

Thank you for a very good presentation

Thanks Colin and Charles.

Iron

Thank you for another excellent presentation.

Iron

Thanks for all that replied, i'll look int the Arduino.

Iron

Thanks a lot for the presentation today, be here tomorrow.

Iron

I like the maniac concept.

Iron

@Pat Mc - are you using IE?

 

On Slide 7, coud you please elaborte a little bit what do you mean by saying "Enumated types are taken seriously"? thanks.

To answer: struct defaults to public, whereas a class defaults to private, otherwise identical

Iron

??? What was the syntax error in slide 15

Iron

I still have no audio

Iron

? how to use extern "C"?

 

Iron

all members of a struct are public by default

members of a class are private by default

see inheritance

Iron

SLIDE 19: Question review: What is the difference between a class and a struct in C+ ?

Blogger

struct properties and methods are public by default

Iron

class define any object while struct used mostly for data

Iron

A class allows the programmer to control access to the member variables with the public, private, and protected keywords.  A struct has only public members.

Iron

Sorry, Got here late use C

Iron

code error? mystruct astruct();?

Iron

My audio is gone!

Iron

Similar

struct is used in c

class in C+

Iron

Both Struct and Class contain data while Class can contain code

Iron

I'll admit that right now I don't know the difference.  All I can think of is the similarities.

Iron

class encapsulates data and methods.  Methods include constructors and destructors along with access.

Iron

Class has data & Functions

Iron

Should know difference but can't remember

Iron

a struct has data only.  A class can have functions (methods).

Iron

A class member can be private, all members are public in a struct

Iron

struct has default public access, class has private access as default for methods and attributes

Iron

memebrs can be variables or code

Iron

Public and private.  Struct is public and Class is private

Iron

The default access mode of methods and data members. Struct defaults to public while class defaults to private. Otherwise, they are similar.

Iron

A structure is just an orginanization of some sort.  A class includes all the necessary structures to implement the desired functionality.

 

Iron

I'm a newbie and don't really know without looking it up...

Iron

Classes can contain functions and variables, but structs only have variables

Iron

classes are usually held inside of a structure

Iron

A class defined with the class keyword has private members and base classes by default.
A structure is a class defined with the struct keyword and its members and base classes are public by default.

Iron

class has function defined, struct only has definition of variables?

 

Iron
[2]A struct may not contain a function definitio.
Iron

lots - struct only have variables - classes can have functions andvariables - both public and private

Iron

A class can contain code.

Iron

Difference between a class and a struct:  A class can be inherited.

Iron

Class encapsulate both data and code while struct only encapsulate data.

 

Iron

struct members are all public by default, class members are private by default

Iron

Class can contains data and code

Iron

structs are containers for data/variables

class is container for code and data

Iron

Class can keep data private and contain code

 

Iron

Classes create objects that have specific scope.  As well, classes have members that are private scope by default; structs are public by default.

Iron

A struct is a data structure

A class is a data structure, accessors, constructors, and destructors for the data structure

 

a class  defaults to members being private while a struct defaults to members being public.

Iron

A class is a struct in which the fields access can be controlled.

Iron

class may include functions

You can have private members in a class

Iron

Class can have function, structure don't have function

The difference is subtle.

Iron

Class has data and code. Struct has only data.

Iron

a class can have private and protected members struct can not

Iron

struct only carries fields

Iron

[2] in Cpp, classes may (and often do) contain code, whereas a struct may only contain data def'n

Struct is for data -- a class can hold functions and data as well as properties

Iron

class can contain code while struc does not?

Iron

Classes include methods (functions for that object type.)

class is data plus methods

 

Iron

struct has only data (members) not methods.

Blogger

Struct is a data while class includes code

Iron

Classes normally include methods

Iron

public vs private

Iron

class can contain methods (functions), struct cannot

Bronze

class has data and code; struct only data

classes are private, structs are public

 

Iron

Public/private and the ability to contain code.

Iron

class has code and data; struct has prototype/data only

Iron

Class can have code

 

Iron

Don't know difference.

Iron

[2] both are class objects, structs have public members by default, classes have private

Iron

struct is a value type, class is a reference type

Iron

A class contains functions while a struct does not.

Iron

A struct can contain data. A class is like a struct but it also can contain code.

Iron

I have actually no clue!

Iron

a class has also code, not only data as a struct

Iron

1) Class can contain code

Iron

[2] in C+ a class can contain code

Iron

Class contains code and data

Struct contains only data

Iron

A class usually contains methods as well as properties (variables) while a struct only contains properties.

Iron

The class can contain also code not only data.

Iron

classes and structs are the same Except the default access modifier is public for structs and private for classes

Iron

Class encapsulate both data and operation while struct only encapsulate data.

Iron

A C structure is stictly data; a Cpp class contains member data and member methods (functions) that manipulate the member data and perform required transformations of the class.

Iron

2: a class can contain code, a struct cannot

Iron

struct members default public, members of class default private

Iron

struct defaults to public, class defaults to private, otherwise identical.

Iron

structs are public by default and classes are private by default

Iron

The differnce between a struct and a class is that the members of a struct are all public while the class members can be private

Question: What is the difference between a class and a struct in C+ ?

Blogger

? Any difference between C+ for PC and C for embedded? Any diff in C for embedded for different microprocessors or platforms?

Iron

Class is object oriented, they are like an assembly of different snippets but of similitude, belonging to the same object. 

Struct is more like accesing variables that are common to a same object and be able to read or write them.

People mention CodeBlocks a lot as a C+ IDE. It can use various toolchains I gather

http://www.codeblocks.org/

fwiw

Iron

The embedded compilers I use won't allow "for (int x=0; x<3; x+ )".  The "int" declaration must always follow the "{".

Iron

think about the maintenance programmer coming after your work.

Iron

@Jimmy

AVR is from ATmel company and you can find different compiler like WinAVR, Code vision and Keil

Iron

Oops I see you wanted a C++ compiler.

Iron

Glad that finally got cleared up (C+ or C )??

Iron

AVR is far superior to PIC.  I have used both.

 

Iron

?Are all C keywords recognized by C+ ?

Iron

@JimmyD, AVR is Atmel version of PIC, see arduino products for examples. will be familiar

Iron

Came in late.  Scottsdale, AZ

Iron

@JimmyD for the PIC18, there is the Microchip XC8 compiler. Before it was the Hi-Tech PICC18 compiler. Long history of compliers in that bloodline.

Iron

Late greeting from Dayton, OH.

Platinum

Thanks.  I'm using mostly Microchip's PIC18 chips with their C compoiler. 

The AVR is a different animal i presume.

Iron

I've been using C for embedded dev, but also c+ and looking into lua.

Iron

@JimmyD Try one of the Atmel kits to get started. The ARM kits will use code from Atmel Studio. TI has Code Composer -- again the TI ARM TIVA Launch Pad is cheap and the compiler free -- in all cases the compilers run on the PC.

Iron

What language are you using for embedded development today?

Assembler-keep it to hardware approach 

Iron

@JimmyD, sorry, meant c+ for AVR and it's free, open source libraries, great tutorial support

Iron

https://archive.eiffel.com/eiffel/projects/hp/creel.html

Iron

@JimmyD look to any chip manufacturer, ANY, they all sell compilers or have partners with compiler makers. These are called "cross compilers" because they run on a PC but make code for an embeded chip.

Iron

@JimmyD, try arduino IDE with the C+ compiler for AVR.

Iron

@Colin Walls : I have no issues with longer sessions !  No need to shorten them...   ;-)    [more for the "money" !]

 

Iron

Anyone uses Eiffel "Eiffel for embedded systems at Hewlett-Packard"

"C&#43;&#43;"

 

Iron

I used Borland C in the past for performing tasks on the PC. Where can i get a C+ complier for embedded?

Iron

I call it beauified C 

Iron

Mostly C, ADA95 also

Iron

What language are you using for embedded development today?

At this moment, no one.

mostly C, rarely assembler

 

Iron

it is never good when your code gets mange

Iron

BASIC is still an option. have used it for many years.

Iron

? You are telling us HOW to migrate from C to C+ , but do you RECOMMEND it? I think you do but it would boost my confidence if you said so explicitly.

 

Iron

Some C+ , depending on project

Iron

We use mostly C with some assembly thrown in to keep the old guys happy.

Iron

?How about teaching, should we use C or C+ ?

Iron

C and Assembler

Iron

What, BASIC is not an option? Maybe I should have typed PIC-BASIC?

Iron

We use C almost exclusively.

 

using c/c+ for embedded development

Iron

Have used assembly and C

Iron

ASM (micro dependant, obviously) and C

 

Iron

We use assembler, C and some C+ .

 

Iron

and assembly when necessary

Iron

Using C with some scripting in Python

For serious work, I use C.  I have also played with processing on arduino boards.

Mostly using + (Cpp) Pascal on the desktop, Python occasionally.

Iron

Using mostly C with assembly at times.

Iron

[1] Mix of C and CPlusPlus

Iron

Languages used today? None at this time.

Iron

[1] C, C+ , Perl/Python to generate C

Iron

Currently using C, assembler and VHDL.

Iron

I am using assembly and C language

Iron

I have used Assembler, Machine Language, C, and C+ .

Iron

Assembler, C+ and mostly C.

Blogger

C almost exclusively.

Iron

C for embedded development

hello all from Edmonton alberta.

Iron

C, assembly and shell scripts

 

Iron

We use C, ASM, C+ ,etc.

Iron

assembly, C and C+

Iron

Using assembly and C++

Gold

Using ANSI C with a small bit of assembly.

Iron

1: we use c almost exclusively.

Iron

using C and assembly for embedded

C, maintaining PL/M

Iron

We use C predominantly.

Iron

C and Assembly migrating to C+

Iron

C & assembly language

Iron

currently using assembly & C

Bronze

C:99%   Assembly:1%

Iron

Embedded languiages - C and assembler.

Iron

C with bits of asm

Iron

[1] used C previously

 

Iron

Today I use C, with an occasional smattering of assembler.

What language are you using for embedded development today?

Blogger

Using C and ASM today.

Iron

Currently using Cpp and C#.

Iron

Using a combination of C and C"+ "  Depends on the customer and processor.

Iron

Same as yesterday, still C+ .

Currently use  C, assembly.

Iron

Embedded linux and C

[1] C, C+ (minimal), assembly

Iron

We are using C and ASM

Iron

We're on slide 4 .

Blogger

I'm using Python and C programming for embedded development today.

Iron

[1] primarily Cpp, some C and assembler for low-level actions (mostly to access RT or NRT functionality)

Are there some tools to translate C to C+ ?

Iron

We use C here in Sacramento/Folsom, CA.

Iron

Today I use C and ASM

Iron

The audio level is low, comparatively.

Hello from London UK

? is it raining in UK?

Iron

Using a combination of C and C+

Iron

A class can contain code, a struct only data

Iron

Here from Canton, Ohio, USA

Bronze

Hello rom Delavan, WI.

 

Iron

Hello from Brisbane!

Iron

Try typing  "C&#43;&#43;"

Iron

Most development is C, with some C+ features

Iron

Hello from Sequim, WA

Iron

Hello from Albuquerque

Iron

If we migrate to C+ , why do we still use C in embedded programs?

Iron

Yes, and remember C++ -- = C

Iron

Hello From Johnson City, TN

Iron

Once more unto the breach.

Hi all -Audio is live! If you don't see the audio bar at the top of the screen, please refresh your browser. It may take a couple tries. When you see the audio bar, if it doesn't start automatically, hit the play button. If you experience audio interruptions and are using IE, try using FF or Chrome as your browser. Many people experience issues with IE. Also, make sure your flash player is updated with the current version. Some companies block live audio streams, so if that is the case for your company, the class will be archived on this page immediately following the class and you can listen then. People don't experience any issues with the audio for the archived version.

@all, we talked about the double + coming out single yesterday. The answer was to use the HTML code "++" This was posted by rfindley.  See yesterday's blog.

Gold

Hello from Greensboro, NC

Iron

Hello from Orlando, Florida

Iron

Greetings from Pittsburgh

Iron

Hello from Western PA

 

Iron

Thank Mr rfindley for finding the secret to posting ++.

Iron

Hello from Seattle!

Iron
Hello from Dallas
Iron

Greetings from Guelph

 

Iron

Hello From Windsor Ontario

Iron

WHat does this look like: C+  ?

 

Blogger

Design News CEC++

Iron

Hello from Wisconsin

Iron

Hello from Montreal.

Iron

Greetings from Vermont

Iron

Hello from Sunny Rochester, NY

 

Iron

Hello from Dayton, OH.

Iron

Hello from Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Iron

Hi from Thornville, Ohio

Iron

Hi everybody...!!!

 

Iron

Hello from Merlin, OR

Greetings again from Owensboro, KY.

Iron

Also, you can use CPP.

Iron

Hello again from Long Island, NY

Iron

From Yesterday...

 

@All, if you type "C++", it comes out as "C+ "

Iron
Iron

We will be starting at the top of the hour and I will be back here at the end of the lecture and will do my best to answer some questions

Blogger

Hello from Philippines.

Hello from Pittsburg

Iron

Who'd a thunk it? C+ in bold trial.

Hello all, a nice day here in PA, to study C++... + + + to you all!

Iron

Spell it out C plus plus maybe

Iron

Missing the second and the third '+'.

Iron

Hello from Longmont, CO

Iron

not sure, but this morning logged into corporate LAN and audio was available, today  I am using VPN!!

 

Iron

Test,test:

"C+ " second ' ' still missing?

Iron

Have we fixed the "C++" thing yet #:-)

Iron

@naimi145: what was wrong with the audio yesterday?

Blogger

hello from Orange county

Iron

Hi all, hope the audio works today!

Iron

Hello fom Lawrence MA.

Iron

You are eligible to earn IEEE Professional Development Hours by attending these courses and participating in the chat function. Additionally, we are no longer using the points system, offering "graduation", or giving grades. The IEEE hours are taking the place of that. There are some important things for you to know about earning the hours. The most important ones are that you need to attend these courses live, you need to attend a minimum of two of them per semester, you need to fill out a course evaluation form within 2 weeks of the end of the class, you need to attend 4 out of the 5 classes per course, and you need to participate in the chat function every day you attend. Please click on the link at the top of this page that says "How do I earn IEEE professional development hours" to read all of these important details and more.

Blogger

Hello from Kansas

Iron

hello everyone from Timisoara

Iron

hello from Mishawaka

Iron

Signing in from COS.

Iron

How are you? I'm fine. Greetings from sunny south Florida.

good afternoon from Detroit, Michigan

Hello, from Shelton, WA

Iron

good to be aboard again

Iron

A second Hello from Rochester, NY!

Iron

Good afernoon from Rochester, NY

Iron

hi from Guadalajara!

Please join our Digi-Key Continuing Education Center LinkedIn Group at http://linkd.in/yoNGeY and be sure to follow @designnews and @DigiKeyCEC on Twitter for the latest class information. We encourage you to tweet about oday's class using #DigiKeyCEC.

Blogger

The streaming audio player will appear at the top of this web page when the show starts at 2 PM Eastern time today. If the audio doesn't start automatically, click on the play button to start it. Note however, that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts, the audio bar doesn't appear or you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser. If that doesn't work, try using Firefox or Google Chrome as your browser. Some users experience audio interruptions with IE. Also, make sure your flash player is updated with the current version. If that doesn't work, your company is likely blocking the live stream. The class will be archived immediately following our live taping and you will be able to listen to it then. You shouldn't experience any problems with the audio when listening on-demand.

 

Blogger

@LEE337 -- for TI I use their compiler Code Composer Studio. For ST I have used IAR and COOCOX (you can use CPP with COOCOX) For Atmel I use their latest Atmel Studio product. I have also used "raw" gcc under mingw and cygwin etc. 

I'm agnostic -- only care of it will do the job.

Iron

Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.

Blogger

Hello Everyone. How everybody doing?

Iron

Is there any automatic tool to assist translation of C software into C+ ?

Iron

Hello frm Skopje, Macedonia

Iron

Hi Colin. I am looking forward for another great lecture.

Iron

Hello from Summerville, SC.

Iron

@DaveWR: which compiler/IDE do you use?

Iron

Hi from Panama City, FL.

Iron

@bitbanger: I use C+ for all my projects where it is possible. You do not have to call in the unwieldy libraries unless necessary. However, those libraries used as needed can provide a lot of functionality that saves a lot of coding. 

I use TI and Atmel mostly -- but am starting with ST as well.

Iron

Hello from sunny SE Lake Simcoe Ontario Canada.

Iron

Hello from Montana

Gold

Hello everyone from Chicago

Iron

Hi from Minneapolis.  It's gonna be 78 degF today.

Iron

Same here I won't be attending live sessions. My sessions always start with at least 10minute delay, regardless of browser(FF or Chrome), and won't even play on IE.

Iron

I won't be able to attend the live sessions, but I am looking forward to the archived sessions!

Silver

A little early but hello from rainy mid Michigan.

Iron

Any reason to go from C to C+ for most simple embedded systems?



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