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fire-iron.biz
User Rank
Gold
Re: More than vacuum cleaners
fire-iron.biz   6/19/2014 10:26:24 AM
I'm in my twenty-ninth year of experience serving industrial clients and nothing surprises me anymore. I used to ask, "How much more stupid could they get?" and not a month passes without the trophy passing to a new recipient. To be fair it's not just Ford or even the automotive industry (though they are leading the pack) it's everything from waste shredding/compacting equipment to residential refrigerators. Brand new air conditioner, how brilliant to use a non-corrosive plastic condensate tray then attach it with steel rivets that will rot out in a couple years. How brilliant to locate the completely unnecessary and overly delicate electronic control directly above the oven vent on kitchen range where it gets blasted with steam and 500°F heat. Failure to install <$500 worth of bearing guards to prevent a $65k failure on a $1.2 million machine. Total loss of a machine and over $2 million in damages resulted from a short-circuit that would have been prevented had engineering not considered a $100 fuse assembly "unnecessary".

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: More than vacuum cleaners
Amclaussen   6/18/2014 4:38:29 PM
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Now I see.  You are right, of course! (I was guessing the system could pressure drive the back flow, now I see it is not the case).

And I suspect the placement above the engine could have other disadvantages too. (Air pockets?)...

I personally hate when filters are not mounted vertically with the mounting face upwards... horizontally mounted ones always tend to spill some oil on engine or on the floor.  I have the practice of minimizing lack of lubrication trying to fill fliters as much as possible before screwing them to the engine block.  When assembling a new or rebuilt engine, I used means to turn the oil pump in order to prelubricate the entire engine before the critical first start-up.  From time to time, I found engines with some problem like one rocker arm not feeding oil, and dirt dislodged from dirty oil galleries from not properly cleaned engine blocks. But knowing that Ford designed such a filter on top of the engine only raises my disbelief on that company designs and products. Amclaussen.

fire-iron.biz
User Rank
Gold
Re: More than vacuum cleaners
fire-iron.biz   6/18/2014 4:29:37 PM
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Amclaussen,

What happens with the oil pan does not change the fact that the oil filter is mounted on the top of the engine. When the seal on the filter housing is broken, the backflow of oil flushes dirt/debris stopped by the filter back into the oil passages. Stirring up dirt means premature death in any lubrication system. There are two primary reasons why properly designed cartridge filter housings allow the cartridge to remain in the bowl as it's being removed: 1. All trapped materials remain in the housing; 2. the filter & housing can be pre-lfilled before installing to minimize dry-run periods.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: More than vacuum cleaners
Amclaussen   6/18/2014 1:26:54 PM
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And what happens if you empty the oil pan completely before loosening the filter?

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The iVac?
OLD_CURMUDGEON   6/5/2014 7:33:54 AM
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Battar:  This counter is embedded into the front door of the electrical control panel for this floor-mounted machine.  I'd venture to guess that MOST often counters such as this one are mounted in similar enclosures, NOT subject to the forces of an F-16 in full rollover mode.  Furthermore, you couldn't fit an extra feather into this 1/16 DIN case of the counter.  The battery has welded tabs to its terminals, and these tabs are soldered into the small P.C. Board.  So, even IF I wanted to unsolder the dead battery, I would not be able to source a new one to replace it that had the welded tabs already fastened.  It was just a poor intial design.  The replacement counter utilizes a coin cell, which IS much more practical, since I'd be willing to bet that OMRON received many complaints about the initial design.  You have to realize that production-line machinery IS usually designed to last decades, not just years.

ADIOS!   

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The iVac?
Battar   6/5/2014 2:14:11 AM
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Old_curmudgeon,

                          Our compamy sold a product with the same type of soldered 1/2AA lithium thionyl battery, but we have since changed the design to use non-soldered types. But there is method in the madness - first, the soldered types wouldn't bounce about and cause voltage drops if the unit was knocked or dropped (we had to design a special battery holder to get round that one), second, most of our customers know how to solder a couple of tabs to a circuit board, and third, very few, if any of our customers use, or intend to use, the same product 10 years straight.

rickgtoc
User Rank
Gold
Re: The iVac?
rickgtoc   6/4/2014 7:50:35 PM
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Your comment about "the minority" caring about quality/maintainability reminded me of of one panel of an old Dilbert strip, where pointy-haired boss declares,

"We don't care what smart people think.  There aren't that many of them."

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The iVac?
Nancy Golden   5/27/2014 7:59:41 PM
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William K. - you reminded me of the good old days when choices were limited because the focus was on quality. From http://www.hyperwrite.com/Articles/showarticleshort.aspx?id=90

One of Henry Ford's famous quotes about the Model T was, "Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants, so long as it is black."

The Model T only came in black because the production line required compromise so that efficiency and improved quality could be achieved. Spraying different colours would have required a break in the production line, meaning increased costs, more staff, more equipment, a more complicated process, and the risk of the wrong colour being applied.

Here is a fun link to the 100th year celebration of Ford:

http://www.autonews.com/files/indices/ford100_1-25_3.html

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The iVac?
William K.   5/27/2014 7:41:56 PM
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Nancy G. I read an interesting paragraph in a blog a few weeks back, where, at the start of the paragraph the author stated that designers were attempting to satify "The consumer demand for more features", but then at the end of the paragraph the author commented that "The designers were using all of these new tools in attempting to create designs that would CAPTURE THE CONSUMERS IMAGINATION", which I see as an admission that consumer demand has not much to do with the proliferation of useless and bothersome features that so many products have. It is not about consumer demand, it is about marketers seeking that holy grail of "product differentiation" that is responsible for the drop in actual quality of many products.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The iVac?
Nancy Golden   5/27/2014 9:54:00 AM
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@William K. I completely agree with your statement: "And as for minimizing cost, I would be happy to pay 10% more for a product that would last and could be repaired."


Unfortunately the current marketing trend is driven by the consumer response that cheaper is better and thus quality is sacrificed as manufacturers shave every penny to be cost-competitive. In that type of marketing environment we aren't even offered that option any longer because companies simply can't compete.


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