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Mydesign
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Re: Energy Efficency
Mydesign   4/2/2014 4:28:52 AM
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"To figure out the life cost of a motor, simple calculations use hours operated, motor energy consumption to see the cost of energy over a 20 year life for the motor. We know the motor purchase price and another guide gives us the average repair cost for replacing motor bearings and cleanup in the middle of the motor's life"

John, thanks now I got it. it's a best assumption by considering the various factors and neglecting the fact that Motor won't stop work in between.

John Malinowski
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Blogger
Re: Energy Efficency
John Malinowski   3/28/2014 8:54:27 AM
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To figure out the life cost of a motor, simple calculations use hours operated, motor energy consumption to see the cost of energy over a 20 year life for the motor. We know the motor purchase price and another guide gives us the average repair cost for replacing motor bearings and cleanup in the middle of the motor's life. These are the 3 slices of the pie.

A program to assist with energy usage on electric motors is available at http://www.baldor.com/support/software_download.asp?type=BE$T+Energy+Savings+Tool

The NEMA carbon study is available at http://www.nema.org/news/Pages/NEMA-First-Phase-Carbon-Footprint-Report-Now-Available-for-Member-Review.aspx

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Energy Efficency
Mydesign   3/28/2014 5:00:08 AM
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"If I understood better how I might be able to post a pie chart here, the one would show motor purchase at about 2%, electricity at around 97% and maintenance of the motor at a little less than 1% over its life cycle. We created this graphic about 25 years ago. A recent study by NEMA and MIT showed the lifetime carbon footprint from a motor as about 99% from electricity usage"

John, thanks for the details, but still not convinced how you figure out these values.

John Malinowski
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Blogger
Re: Energy Efficency
John Malinowski   3/27/2014 8:52:38 AM
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You bring up two important items. The first is changing the paradigms for purchasing folks. We historically have rewarded them for saving money on purchases, but that does not play well with today's idea to increase productivity and reduce downtime and energy consumption. Its like the old oil filter commercial, you can pay a little more now or a lot more later. Purchasing folks need to be on the team to know that cutting corners has a big effect on the bottom line.

If I understood better how I might be able to post a pie chart here, the one would show motor purchase at about 2%, electricity at around 97% and maintenance of the motor at a little less than 1% over its life cycle. We created this graphic about 25 years ago. A recent study by NEMA and MIT showed the lifetime carbon footprint from a motor as about 99% from electricity usage.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Energy Efficency
Mydesign   3/27/2014 6:01:04 AM
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"In the past, OEMs would concentrate on first cost, specifying lower efficiency less expensive motors and components. Users have demanded a more robust machine that increases productivity and lower life cycle cost. The life cost of a motor is only 2%; over 97% is energy cost."

John, how and on what parameters these figures have arrived. Actually for a motor investment si more and we have to account wear & tear, interest part of the investments etc.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Energy Efficency
Mydesign   3/27/2014 5:58:56 AM
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"The proposal is to use a motor with an efficiency as high or higher then the original that was certified with the fan as static pressure changes and larger motors are needed."

Thanks John for your clarification.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Energy Efficency
William K.   3/24/2014 12:25:36 PM
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J.M. You are certainly correct on the costs. But like many other times the challenge is to make the purchasing people understand that reality. That task can require  a bit of effort.

John Malinowski
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Efficency
John Malinowski   3/24/2014 9:34:53 AM
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Thanks for the comments guys.

In the past, OEMs would concentrate on first cost, specifying lower efficiency less expensive motors and components. Users have demanded a more robust machine that increases productivity and lower life cycle cost. The life cost of a motor is only 2%; over 97% is energy cost.

  

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Efficency
TJ McDermott   3/23/2014 11:11:37 PM
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End users are becoming motor conscious, specifying premium efficiency motors to decrease their electric bills.

Enough end users asking for better motors will force OEMs to step up.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Energy Efficency
William K.   3/23/2014 10:14:59 PM
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In another discussion it was pointed out that some OEMs would choose the cheaper less efficient motors to use in thier products to gain a price advantage. So probably any rules would have to include having the motor efficiency information included in the product advertising materials. Sort of an enforcing of "truth in advertising", which I am sure would pain some folks a lot.

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