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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: AUTOMATION'S HISTORY
Ann R. Thryft   4/16/2014 12:16:07 PM
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Rob, this was a lot of fun and I learned a few things, too, like about Elmer and Elsie. Thanks for a great slideshow.
A possible Slide 14 showing entirely robotic assembly with no humans involved could be a still shot from this video of assembly of the BMWi3's Life module:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htuVoxuMQFQ



Rob Spiegel
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Re: AUTOMATION'S HISTORY
Rob Spiegel   3/23/2014 1:25:49 PM
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Interesting point, Bobjengr. I think you're right about the absense of academia. Perhaps much of the raw technology that engineers bring to their solutions comes from academia. Probably vision systems, lasers. Deployment, though, seems to come from engineering solutions.

bobjengr
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Platinum
AUTOMATION'S HISTORY
bobjengr   3/22/2014 2:24:52 PM
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This slide series is fascinating.  One thing I noticed (and I might be incorrect here Rob) is all of the automation technology was contributed by manufacturing and engineering and did not have origin with academia.  This proves to some degree we all are looking for a "better mousetrap". Need and experience seemingly continue to rule the day.  During my university days, I worked as a coop for a gentleman who always said: "if it's repetitive, it can be automated".   He felt any repetitive work was drudgery.  Thinking and "inventing" were the most creative endeavors and man was intended for those two efforts.  Excellent post.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: We might have been Founders, too-
Rob Spiegel   3/19/2014 10:46:26 PM
Yes, back then, you didn't need significant funding to develop something patent-worthy. Abe Lincoln is the only president who holds a patent. He developed a tool for getting flatboats unstuck from sandbars.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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We might have been Founders, too-
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/19/2014 10:16:50 PM
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I just love slide 1, the 1790 Flour Mill.  Makes me almost wish we lived back in those days; with our innovative minds, just think how much low-hanging fruit there would have been to get first dibs – or first patent rights on.  It seems like it may have been easier to get ahead 200 years ago, as our field was not nearly so crowded.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Cheap Labor or Skilled Labor
William K.   3/18/2014 4:35:50 PM
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Skilled labor is always needed, although some programs, (like ISO9000) are aimed at reducing the level of skill required. The fact is that some things just require a lot of skill and insight, and just compiling a set of instructions about how to do the job is of marginal value. There are a lot of things that require talent as well as skill.  BUT cheap labor that only needs to follow simple instructions without thinking is much less in demand now than in just a few years past.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: The laser
Rob Spiegel   3/18/2014 4:25:37 PM
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Yes, Papa, that would have been a good addition.

Papa
User Rank
Iron
The laser
Papa   3/18/2014 3:48:42 PM
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Another invention that should have been included is the laser

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Cheap Labor or Skilled Labor
Rob Spiegel   3/18/2014 1:17:19 PM
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Hey Kground. When manufacturers moved their facilities out of North America, they generally were not seeking SKILLED labor. They were indeed looking for cheap labor. If they wanted skilled labor, they would have stayed.

KGround
User Rank
Iron
Cheap Labor or Skilled Labor
KGround   3/18/2014 10:37:07 AM
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The caption for the last slide reads in part: "Advances in automation have diminished the importance of cheap labor, thus making plants portable."

Surely they meant 'diminished the importance of SKILLED labor ..."

 

 



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