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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3-D PRINTED WOOD
Ann R. Thryft   5/21/2014 1:15:23 PM
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I agree, Cabe, at least for the more expensive ones from the architects. The others though, look mostly like plastic.



Cabe Atwell
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Re: 3-D PRINTED WOOD
Cabe Atwell   5/20/2014 3:20:53 AM
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That is pretty cool. Even though the wood is combined with the polymer, it still has a great looking finish.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3-D PRINTED WOOD
Ann R. Thryft   4/22/2014 8:03:05 PM
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You're welcome, bobjengr. And good point about the wood grain detail, although the amount of detail possible varies from one 3D printing process to another. SLA, for example, is known for greater surface detail than FDM.

bobjengr
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3-D PRINTED WOOD
bobjengr   4/22/2014 7:11:07 PM
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I can certainly understand why this is possible considering the detail 3-D printing can accomplish.  Wood grain finishes make the piece otherwise it would not be distinguishable from any other "printed" design.  3-D printing always amazes me relative to the creative aspects of what can be done. Great post Ann.

William K.
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Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
William K.   4/22/2014 6:03:52 PM
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Weathered oak is indeed a very hard material, and also a lot moreexpensive than hard yellow pine. My best results in using it have been with a Bridgeport milling machine and a very sharp cutter. Feed rates slower than for steel seem to work best. Sharp drill bits and pack drilling are the best choices for producing holes.

Mr. Wirtel
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Gold
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
Mr. Wirtel   4/22/2014 4:27:37 PM
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While yellow pine is hard and durable, I have never come across any wood as hard to work with as old weathered oak. I do not know what kind of oak it was (red, black, white or any other) but when my father-in-law tried to reuse the oak from a barn he dismantled he had to drill holes to get nails in. He even tried the hardened concrete nails. There is a big market around this area for weathered oak. It is used for decorative purposes on both interior and exterior walls where the builder is trying to replicate rustic pioneer sort of building.

mrdon
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Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
mrdon   4/15/2014 7:57:16 PM
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Ann,

You are so right. The Maker community is definitey a creative venue for exploring product ideas through fairs, workshops, and conferences. The collaboration that exists at these events is very contagious. Here's a new conference Dale Dougherty and the Maker Media company are holding next month.

http://makercon.com/

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
Ann R. Thryft   4/15/2014 12:59:46 PM
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mrdon, I think it's cool that many innovations are either starting in, or at least becoming popular among, the maker community. Serious materials development, though, requires investment dollars as shown with the first slides from the architects. But the maker community definitely is a venue for spreading new ideas, even if the execution quality often falls short.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Thinking LARGE
Ann R. Thryft   4/15/2014 11:59:07 AM
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Contour Crafting has been around for several years, but they're by no means the only company involved in 3D printed buildings. Others include D-Shape, StoneSpray, Freeform Construction, Marble Eco Design, and KamerMaker, all based in Europe.

mrdon
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Platinum
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
mrdon   4/14/2014 7:31:58 PM
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Ann,

It's amazing to see how 3D printing has become disruptive in the sense the technology was created to make rapid prototypes for engineering analysis. With the help of the Maker community the technology has transformed where printing of non-plastic materials are becoming the norm. Definitely an interesting technology to keep on one's radar.

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