HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>
edschultheis
User Rank
Iron
Re: Thinking LARGE
edschultheis   4/14/2014 4:33:47 PM
NO RATINGS
TJ,

I think that you will have to move faster to secure patent rights to your idea of making 3D-printed walls for full-size buildings and structures.

 

This first example is a company that has been working on just such a concept.  I'm sure that you will find it interesting:

http://www.contourcrafting.org/

 

This next example is a university research project to make architectural features and load-bearing stuctures:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfbhdZKPHro

 

Ed Schultheis, P.E.

Schultek Engineering & Technology, Inc.

Auburn, CA 95602

www.schultek.com

edschultheis
User Rank
Iron
Re: Thinking LARGE
edschultheis   4/14/2014 4:24:53 PM
NO RATINGS
TJ,

 

I think that you will have to move faster to secure patent rights to your idea of making 3D-printed walls for full-size buildings and structures.

 

This first example is a company that has been working on just such a concept.  I'm sure that you will find it interesting:

http://www.contourcrafting.org/

 

This next example is a university research project to make architectural features and load-bearing stuctures:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfbhdZKPHro

 

Ed Schultheis, P.E.

Schultek Engineering & Technology, Inc.

Auburn, CA 95602

www.schultek.com

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2014 3:12:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, mrdon. I agree about DIY manufacturing. I thin k we'll be seeing a lot more of that, as well as more materials.

JohnMTO
User Rank
Iron
Re: Wide, wide range of quality
JohnMTO   4/1/2014 2:00:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Are you sure this is wood or wood based? It is priced like Kobe beef. Probably would last longer though.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thinking LARGE
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2014 11:58:47 AM
NO RATINGS
Modern straw bale technology is a long way from what you're describing, and it's by no means an impermanent structure: a lot more than straw is involved. Otherwise, local building/planning departments would never have approved it.
Mud or clay mixed with straw is called "wattle and daub": it's an ancient, and very impermanent, building technology suitable for very dry locations. So developing a 3D printer for this material mix wouldn't be very useful.
There are 3D printers that use dirt or other powders mixed with a binder of polymer for buildings, those exist and/or are being developed by architects. We've reported on a few of them.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Thinking LARGE
William K.   3/25/2014 8:16:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I suppose that straw should indeed last a lot longer than hay, since it has much less food value and a whole lot less moisture. I can see that hay bales with cement sprayed on the outside could resist the weather, and if they were covered with adobe on the inside the fire hazard would be small. But I don't think I would count on them for structural strength for the long term, since they are still organic materials with a very high surface to volume ratio. Fine for a single story house but probably not for a multi story residence.

How about a machine to 3D print with a straw and clay mix? It would need to have a robot that could build walls, so it would certainly not be a traditional machine. But it is certainly within the grasp of present technology. If anybody develops this concept and is a big success, they owe me a lunch.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thinking LARGE
Ann R. Thryft   3/25/2014 2:49:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, that explains it. What you describe and the modern straw bale technology are worlds apart. Basically, straw bales are used inside the walls and protected, of course, from weather. So the walls are super thick and it's excellent insulation. Many very old building technologies are way better than what we use now, which is determined more by commercial interests than by practicalities.



William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Thinking LARGE
William K.   3/25/2014 2:40:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I was thinking about a hunting lodge that had been built with old hay balesthat were a really good deal, from what I was told. I visited it in it's third year and it was not so very wonderful at that time. But it certainly was a lot warmer than a tent in that part of Michigan, in November. I don't think that anybody chose to use it in following years.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thinking LARGE
Ann R. Thryft   3/25/2014 2:18:52 PM
NO RATINGS
William, it rains here, too. Straw bale houses aren't what you think they are: I suggest you try googling the technology. All those problems have been solved by the construction methods used. The code was changed here to accommodate that house and the technology, and it's been changed elsewhere as well.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Thinking LARGE
William K.   3/25/2014 2:01:46 PM
NO RATINGS
I would not want a straw bale house in Michigan primarily because it would not last very long. We have way too much rain and snow, it would absorb enough moisture to decompose, and then it would be unhealthy to live in as well. But in those counties that avarage a half inch of rainfall during a monsoon year a straw house might work out quite well. 

Besides that, there is a real problem with the inspector simply "not liking" something, and with nothing in the code saying it is OK, the only recourse is an expensive lawsuit. So the person gets his way just because he can, with no valid explanation even offered. This is why so much work is done without permits or inspections. Common sense is often not allowed. And it seems that some of the local codes predate many modern inventions of the past few years. 

<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Released on September 19, 2014, this 5.5 inch screen iPhone is the larger version of the iPhone 6, whose teardown follows tomorrow.
A Design News course on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) should help engineers who are considering the technology for their upcoming designs.
In many engineering workplaces, there’s a generational conflict between recent engineering graduates and older, more experienced engineers. However, a recent study published in the psychology journal Cognition suggests that both may have something to learn from another group: 4 year olds.
CTC releases EtherCAT Master module for high-performance control of networked servos, stepping motors, and I/O devices.
Conventional wisdom holds that MIT, Cal Tech, and Stanford are three of the country’s best undergraduate engineering schools. Unfortunately, when conventional wisdom visits the topic of best engineering schools, it too often leaves out some of the most distinguished programs that don’t happen to offer PhD-level degrees.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service