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Debera Harward
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Silver
Re: Wide, wide range of quality
Debera Harward   3/23/2014 5:05:39 AM
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Thanks Anne, I am really fascinated with this technology of 3d printing the wood that is really very great and somewhat equivalent to MAGIC only :p . Like it will be a great help for wood lovers to customize wood products according to their taste and demand . But will it be expensive like we all know that original wood products are costly will this technology be more expensive than wood products , equivalent to or lesser than that .

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
William K.   3/21/2014 3:09:10 PM
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Ann, the very hardest and toughest wood that I have worked with is old yellow pine. Not only is it a challenge for the power saw, but to nail the pieces I had to drill holes for the spikes. The benefit of using such tough old wood is that I know that it will not break when I step on that part of my roof.

I found the wood left over from when my house was remodeled by the previous owners, who stuck the unused pieces in the attic of the garage, so I know that it was fairly old. What I don't know is if new yellow pine is that tough, or does the toughness come as it ages.  

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
tekochip   3/21/2014 12:19:27 PM
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You're right about the old redwood.  The redwood beams and columns in my home are still in excellent condition even after 120 years!

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
Ann R. Thryft   3/21/2014 11:53:08 AM
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I actually meant whole wood as well as the shavings and sawdust made from it. I've now lived in two old houses that I've helped rebuild parts of, and repurposing old wood has been interesting. Most of it that wasn't downright rotten simply was weaker, especially if it was a softwood like pine or Doug fir. In the west we also have redwood, which can last for a very long time without decaying. I decided to keep the 60-year-old redwood bones of my current cabin because they're in excellent condition, and you can't get that quality redwood anymore for any price. But I'm replacing most of the Doug fir. I've had much of that chipped and it sure is different from fresh new wood chips. So I guess it really depends on what wood, where it's located, what job it did in the building, and what kind of damage--insect, moisture, etc--it underwent.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
William K.   3/20/2014 12:27:03 PM
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Ann, It is certainly true that shavings and sawdust do change as they oxidize and their moisture level varies. But I was thinking of the whole lumber, which while being old has been protected from the majority of the destructive forces. I would be interesting to find out from the developers of this technology about what would work and what would not work so well. One thing is certain is that wood that has been sheltered for 50 years has a much lower moisture content.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
Ann R. Thryft   3/20/2014 11:16:01 AM
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William, the source of the wood fibers wasn't always clear, but that would be a great idea if it's feasible. The fibers in old wood shavings & sawdust are pretty different from those in new wood shavings & sawdust, and might not have the right properties.



NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mix it up.
NadineJ   3/18/2014 6:05:13 PM
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Agreed.  If this is strong and stable enough to use in architecture, we may be in for a new era of design.  Since the late 50's things have become boxier and blander.  This could help bring back craftsmanship and detailing without the high cost.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mix it up. And the real beauty of it is.....
William K.   3/18/2014 4:46:38 PM
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This is really an excellent development, since all kinds of things can be made, and not much limitation on the shapes of things.

What is a real added advantage is that the wood fibers can come from our own "deconstructed" housing, those buildings being torn down for various reasons. So there is no need to harvest trees to make all of this stuff, the feedstock is already available, for free, or just for the taking. So using wood like this provides a doubled benefit. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mix it up.
Ann R. Thryft   3/18/2014 12:07:53 PM
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Thanks, Daniyal_Ali. Although I was surprised that it was already being done. The maker space isn't my beat so I'm less aware of what people are doing there, but it's a start, and the quality is about what you'd expect from those machines. The high-end art stuff is what really knocked my socks off. I think there's a great potential for recycling and, as you point out, saving trees.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Wide, wide range of quality
tekochip   3/18/2014 8:31:55 AM
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What a lot of fun!  I love the printed grain, maybe I'll have my next prototypes made in basswood?

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