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CDB
User Rank
Iron
STEM Walk - Things Of Science
CDB   3/4/2014 10:06:43 AM
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Some of us are trying to revive an older program that ended about twenty years ago that had a big impact for many of us of a certain age.

"Things of Science" comprised a subscription to a service that sent out a little blue box about once a month with some project and some parts to make something, or mess around with stuff.  The projects themselves ranged from building a sextant (a favorite of mine, since my father and I made it, and then, since he was a merchant marine officer, he taught me how to shoot a sun sight), to various kinds of bugs.  I also remember building an electric motor out of nails, and a bunch of other projects, many of which were re-purposed in other forms afterwards.  I recall the subscription cost was about the same as my subscription to "Donald Duck ..."

I understand that a lot of the stuff was donated by various industries.

The program ended in about 1990 (my daughter got the last one then).

The science service (that runs the ISF) had the rights to the program, but hasn't run it for a while.

Not sure exactly what to do, but I have been speaking to various people and foundations about it.  Folks at the NAE have pointed out that it is actually about half "Things of Engineering", and that might be a way to go.

Anyway, if people are interested, please feel free to contrubute to the nascent movement by at least discussing it, especially if you got those boxes yourself and they made a difference to you.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: STEM Walk - Things Of Science
naperlou   3/4/2014 4:09:50 PM
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CDB, that sounds like a great program. 

There are school districts (I live in one of them) that have very strong STEM programs.  These are public school districts.  A number of local districts have gotten together to create an institute to enhance the teachning of STEM in K-12 schools.  Much of the funding came from companies.  The web site is http://www.aurora.edu/stem/vision/index.html. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Interesting link
Charles Murray   3/4/2014 6:49:15 PM
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That's an interesting link to the Hewlett-Packard paper, Rich. As it points out, part of the problem is attracting young students toward engineering, Programs like FIRST can certainly help with that, and I applaud them for the work they've done. But the other part of the problem is keeping students after they start college engineering curriculums. Most major universities have engineering washout rates between 50% and 67%, largely because engineering school is hard. It's always going to be tough to keep students who don't want to work that hard, especially if they think they can make equal or better money elsewhere.  

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Interesting link
Greg M. Jung   3/4/2014 8:43:57 PM
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Charles, I agree with you.  Students are very aware of the job market today and if they put the extra effort in for an engineering degree, they want to make sure that extra compensation will be waiting for them when they graduate.  They are also aware that while an engineering degree does afford a lucrative growth path as the years go on, non-engineering degrees can also offer an accelerated climbing rate up the corporate ladder too.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting link
Charles Murray   3/6/2014 7:15:03 PM
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Yes, Greg, many students are aware of today's job market, and for that reason some of the kids who would otherwise be capable of graduating in engineering never even try. Many East Coast schools (i.e., Ivy League) have large numbers of economics graduates who go on to make three or four times as much as engineers by choosing investment banking. Many of these students have strong math backgrounds, which might otherwise serve them well in an engineering curriculum. But why should they do that when they can make so much more in investment banking?

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Interesting link
Greg M. Jung   3/6/2014 11:03:14 PM
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Charles, well stated.  Many would-be engineers are now pursuing careers in data analytics and quantitative analysis (which pay much more).  The financial rewards for these majors are usually much greater than a standard engineer's salary.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting link
Charles Murray   3/7/2014 4:45:20 PM
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I guess what it comes down to, Greg, is that engineering has to be a labor of love.

djensen@mmm.com
User Rank
Iron
Be A Mentor - Get Involved - You will Love IT!
djensen@mmm.com   3/5/2014 10:02:48 AM
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There are few things more rewarding than being a mentor for a FIRST team.  There is no harder fun you can have, and it's a great way to pay it forward.  I have students who join not knowing righty-tighty-lefty-loosy, but after a season or two they start asking "What engineering schools I should apply to?"  I KNOW this program changes the trajectory of students - Every year there are kids drifting in the winds of uncertainty about where to go in their careers - who 'lock on target' when they join an FRC team. 

With so much bad Karma about 'hating your job', It is a wonderful gift to provide kids exposure to a career they could love the rest of their life, explaining that not only do I get to do engineering at work, I love it as a hobby too- and for one fourth of the year, I get to share with students who likely would never know what real engineering is all about. GO TO www.usfirst.org and see how you can make a difference doing something fun.

TomBee
User Rank
Iron
Thank you for supporting FIRST
TomBee   3/5/2014 10:09:10 AM
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I started volunteering at FIRST in 2005. This is my 9th season (Aerial Assist) and I still love watching the students and teams grow and develop year after year. The robot is a focus but it is only a means to the goal of creating a viable environment for learning business and technology. Rookie teams experience the start-up phase. The Veteran teams must learn sustainability and mentoring. The Great teams reach out to the community and other schools. They become founders of new teams.

I am a engineer that had to bootstrap my drive to build things. In the 60's and 70's opportunities like FIRST were few and far between. I value the change we are making in bringing these students a new perspective on accomplishing real-world results with real-world constraints.

Thank you Rich for reaching out to listen and learn about the FIRST mission and goals. You have helped to create and sustain the opportunity that teaches these students that 'Gracious Professionalism' is a worthy business principle and golden rule for STEM students.

Learn more at : www.usfirst.org 

BrusselsSprout
User Rank
Gold
STEM STEAM issues
BrusselsSprout   3/5/2014 10:46:51 AM
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One aspect that continues to confound me is the attempt to insert Art into the STEM curriculum to make it STEAM.  As best I can determine the STEAM program is an attempt to ride the coat tails of a good program and reduce its focus and thus effectiveness.

The reason we have STEM in the first place is the gap in effective instruction in the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic in our education system (note the absence of art).  It is these three elements that support knowledge, communication and science.  In turn, these are the engines of innovation and engineering.  Without innovation and engineering, enterprise is dead and our community fails to move forward.

The Arts insertion in STEM is predicated on the idea that art is the sole repository of innovation and creativity.  I think it is here that the justification breaks down.  Yes, there is art in engineering and innovation but it is one bred from the nature of human endeavor, not just from, painting, sculpture and outward appearance.

Wherever humans create in any realm we make connections in structure and form that are endemic to the creation.  We do not need to "create a work of art that visually explains" an engineering design or scientific discovery for it to be useful or validated.  If you cannot appreciate the art inherent in the design you likely need to expand your understanding of the innovation process.

We do not need works of art to insert something in our innovations that is already there.  We do need youth with a strong foundation in science, engineering and math to be able to be successful innovators and move us forward.

If we focus on STEM we will have a community based on successful enterprise with free capital to pay artists for their work.  That is the coat tails that the arts should be riding.  If we focus instead on the arts, we will divert our efforts from the building the foundation neccessary to make art a successful endeavor.

Without STEM Art will not survive.  Conversely, the absence of art will not be the end of STEM.  Let's keep the cart before the horse.

PGillaspy
User Rank
Gold
STEM yes, Accelerated Learning no
PGillaspy   3/5/2014 11:00:26 AM
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I work with MESA (Math Engineering Science Achievement) as chairman of the Industry Advisory Council in Utah and have a Ph.D. in meteorology/physics.  We definitely need an added emphasis on STEM. What I do not want to see is the continued accelerated learning that has crept into the school system over the past 30 years. Acceleraed as in taking calculus as sophmore in high school.  It is well known that boys mature much slower than girls. The boys are simply not ready to compete academically with the girls in these acceleratd learning environments. It is as if graduating from college at age 18 is the object. The school system needs to take this into account and allow the young men to mature at their natural rate. There are exceptions of course, but by and large, the young men simply cannot compete until they reach about 16 to 18.  Does it really matter whether you graduate from college at age 18 or age 24?

npitech
User Rank
Iron
Schools of Hope
npitech   3/5/2014 12:30:08 PM
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 STEM is important to me; I became painfully aware of how far we have fallen behind while I was in Malaysia. The newspapers were publishing practice exit exams for high school students. These included questions in electronics, chemistry, statistics, probability, calculus and physics. I don't think too many U.S. students would fare well on those tests.

The problems with our schools go beyond STEM. There are many children struggling with learning to read. They get get no practice at home for many reasons: their parents are too busy, English is not spoken at home, their parents are not literate, etc, etc.

 By third grade, children are expected to know how to read and are expected to learn subject material from reading. Any child who can not read well by then is more than likely going to face a lifetime of being behind the curve. 

I participate in Schools of Hope. Teachers teach to the average level of their classes. Start with making sure that all of the kids can read and you can raise the quality of education.

 

Al Klu
User Rank
Gold
STEM and FIRST
Al Klu   3/5/2014 12:59:32 PM
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I have been mentoring my son's FIRST teams for several years now.  I spent 6 years mentoring their FIRST Lego League, one year in FRC (the big bots), and the past 3 years in FTC (smaller bots based on Tetrix building kits).  Every year has been exciting, not just for me, but for all the kids on the teams.  My older son's robot was actually sent up to New Hampshire to get its picture taken with Dean Kamen.  By mentoring, I am learning a tremendous amount about robotics myself, not to mention learning a lot about this new genertion of Tekkies!

What I like best about these teams is that there are many students who do not fit into "typical" school spirit activities (e.g. sports, music/drama, politics).  These kids shine making things and making them go.  And these kids are many times the best technical members of the teams.  I think 30 years ago we would have called them nerds, and they made many of the best engineers.  And by representing their school, they grow in the respect they get from the community.

I especially like the FTC challenges, as the season is longer and less stressful than the FRC challenges.  Plus, the kids are far more "hands-on" in these teams than they would be in the FRC teams, which only allows 6 weeks from start of challenge to working robot.  There is a lot more building and rebuilding going on wiht FTC.

The biggest challenge in any FIRST activity is getting the resources together, not just for the teams, but for the hosts of the various competitions and scrimmages.  Your generous donation is really appreciated.

Ceylon0
User Rank
Silver
Thank You plus...
Ceylon0   3/13/2014 12:13:42 PM
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While I commend Design News for helping get children, (especially the less fortunate) to get involved in STEM, the problem needs to be addressed at the sources.

 

First and foremost is the reduced respect for the engineering profession that is allowed to be practiced by corporations. Even Steve jobs infamously colluded with competitors to subvert the marketplace so that they could keep their best people at reduced cost. We are long passed the days when a fair days work meant a fair days pay. The executive suites are filled with people who make more money in the time it takes Windows to load on their computer in the morning than an increasing majority of others who, may not have the ambition to be the next Steve Jobs, but certainly work just as hard, if not more so. This is a sickness that the media in large part refuses to expose because after all, they themselves are forced to submit to this same sort of anti-competitive, monopolist manipulations of the wealthy and powerful.

 

Second, engineers are to blame themselves. Their understanding of economics, the history of labor, and basic civics is laughable. I've heard the most ridiculous and anecdotal nonsense from otherwise intelligent engineers who consistently use ideology as a prerequisite to their understanding of most anything and everything. It's actually ironic that many can analyze engineering problems, but have no intellectual rigor when it comes to others. I'm referring to those who have demonstrably forgotten that science, and more importantly Nature doesn't care what the hell they believe in; or even claim to believe in.

 

Lastly, I could probably come up with more avenues of attack which would lead to a more progressive world, consistent with more people capable of STEM; however what would be the point. If given an opportunity to read this, the many ideologues would immediately look to paste a label on what I'm saying rather than actually investigate what I'm saying.

CommonMan
User Rank
Iron
FIRST Involvement
CommonMan   3/13/2014 12:24:16 PM
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Rich,

You asked for comments about FIRST involvement.  I have been a FIRST FRC team mentor since 2007.  I would have started earlier if I knew then how much fun it is to be involved.  The first two years I got involved because my son was interested.  Being on the robotics team helped him decide to go into Mechanical Engineering.  He has since graduated and is working as a Mechanical Engineer and has commented several times how that hands-on experience has helped him in his career.  I have related similar comments to my management and colleagues from my own personal experience as a team mentor.  I have continued to learn about different technologies and how to adapt them to my work life that I otherwise would not have had the exposure to if not for my involvement in FIRST.  I am a technical person and enjoy working with technology.  However, FIRST is not just about technology, although it is a big part.  A FIRST FRC team functions like a business.  There are opportunities for skills of many types on the team from marketing, business, management, trades, human resources, and on and on.  Some businesses wisely encourage FIRST team mentorship as a training tool for their engineers, project leaders and managers.  It's a great way to learn or polish many skills that are needed on the job.  Tooling and machine shops would be wise to partner with FIRST teams to encourage interest with, and have access to potential future employees that have the skills needed to fill high demand jobs.  I hope that having a partnership with a major industry publication like Design News will increase awareness of this very valuable activity.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: FIRST Involvement
Charles Murray   3/17/2014 5:41:16 PM
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Kudos on your work with FIRST, CommonMan. FIRST is a great source of inspiration for prospective engineers, as your son's case so apltly proves. We at Design News are big fans of their work.

BrianK
User Rank
Iron
Sponorship of First
BrianK   3/28/2014 6:08:28 PM
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Great to hear of DN's support of FIRST. I have been a mentor since 2006 - this is my ninth year. I got involved as many do, with their kids. After my kids graduated, I stayed on to help. Not only is it a fun thing to do, I see it as my responsiblity to pass along the things I have been fortunate to learn over the years. To me, its a no brainer. I don't see it as how I CAN be involed, but how can I NOT afford to participate in programs like this.

 

M Dwyer
User Rank
Iron
FIRST Sponsorship
M Dwyer   4/7/2014 9:15:49 AM
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I'm sitting here watching the FIRST Midwest Regional in Chicago as I type this to you.  I've been involved in FIRST Robotics since 2007 as a parent, mentor and now a friend of Team 1732 Hilltopper Robotics.  This program has not failed to impress me over the years. 

Our FRC team has grown from a handful of boys (Marquette University HS is an all boys school) to a co-ed team (we've partnered with Divine Savior Holy Angel) of over 60 students.  Students not only learn how to work together to brainstorm, design and build a working robot in 6 short weeks, but also how to fund raise, market and promote the program and their team.  As with many teams, ours is solely run by adult volunteers who give up the evening and Saturday free time to mentor the teams.  This is how much we believe in the importance of the program.  Watching the growth over these few years for FIRST has been amazing. 

Our team also participate in community outreach including running two FIRST Lego League Tournaments for our area grade school teams.    No matter the age the excitement that the kids show proves that STEM is fun and this generation 'gets it'.  It's not an inexpensive sport and none of us could do it without companies such as yours who donate to the program. 

 

Thank you for your donation.  I encourage you attend a regional or the championship if you can.  Talk to the teams----they all love to tell their stories.  Your ROI will be immeasurable.     

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: FIRST Sponsorship
Cabe Atwell   5/28/2014 2:33:36 AM
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STEM is certainly having an impact on kids today and it's amazing how many programs are being offered through schools and community centers. Back in my day, only a handful of us hung out in garages trying to build everything from robots to gaming systems. Seems those garages have spread all over the world now.



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