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J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
J. Williams   3/4/2014 1:10:15 PM
Ah yes.  Very good.  A pick-up truck is considerably easier to do that than the whole coach on a 'Burb.  Point well taken and something I will remember if I have to anything like that with my Ford PU truck.  I understand your difficulty with that right front.  If I couldn't have pull that cupronickel line through and then bend it in place, I probably would have resorted to some creative routing that would not have looked pretty.  I think the brake lines were placed on the frame second in assembly, right after the heater core.  :-)

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
Jim_E   3/4/2014 1:01:05 PM
NO RATINGS
"How did you get stainless lines in there especially the one line that runs back to the rear axle is an itchbay to get at? The right front line is a pain in the derierre as well. I found that the cupronickel lines are reasonably easy to form bends in place and it was almost like pulling romex. Big bends can be formed by hand and then use a little bending tool for the tight bends."

The rear one was no problem once I figured out how easy it was to unbolt the bed of the truck and lift it up....

The passenger's side front was horrible, and it was like a 3D puzzle trying to get that in.  The worst was just trying to fit all of the front lines through that small hole at the back of the driver's side wheelwell.  I unbolted the cab mount bolts and jacked the cab up as much as I could with the steering still attached.  I was then able to somehow work the lines through.  You could definitely tell that GM installed the brake lines before the body went on.  As I stated, that was one of the hardest job that I've ever done on a vehicle and I've done about everything!

 

Bryan Goss
User Rank
Gold
Re: Why are Air bags requiring the key switch on any way?
Bryan Goss   3/4/2014 12:54:10 PM
NO RATINGS
If you are simply trying to reduce the damage to a parked unoccupied car, then perhaps a pressure sensor on the seats would be a better option than the ignition switch. This would also reduce the danger to children who sit in the front seat, as they can be injured by air bags.

un4givun2
User Rank
Bronze
No Recall
un4givun2   3/4/2014 12:53:15 PM
NO RATINGS
This is typical business from the big auto manufacturers.  I dealt with one personally with a 2002 VW Passat W8. I had to get rid of the car at 68,000 miles due to a servo valve (cam adjuster) failure that controls the variable valve timing.  Just google W8 Passat with "cam adjuster" failure and see what you get. 99% of these cars with this 4.0L W8 engine had "cam adjuster" failure before reaching 70,000 miles. VW never once acknowledged there was any problem and the cost to fix this problem was $5,500.00. An extended warranty for this car cost almost $5,000.00 for a low mileage car that was only 4 years old because they knew it was going to fail yet no recall was ever done and no buy-back program was ever offered by VW to retain the loyal customers they HAD that were willing to pay $40,000.00+ dollars this car cost new.

The number of cases like this are in the thousands.

Bryan Goss
User Rank
Gold
Re: Why are Air bags requiring the key switch on any way?
Bryan Goss   3/4/2014 12:36:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Is a bump going to deploy them, or only a major collision? And if it is a hard enough bump to deploy them, then wouldn't I want protection? And if they are not made for when parked then should they be deactivated when I am waiting at a stop light? It would seem to me that a front end collision has the same forces on me if I am the one moving or if the other person is the one moving. I still don't see the difference between parked and driving as far as air bags are concerned.

 

 

J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
J. Williams   3/4/2014 12:30:29 PM
NO RATINGS
That's good.  The more people we can get to post compaints, the better chance they might do something about it.  And I've noticed that the other people who post complaints all talk about total brake failure.  The alternate circuit does not work alone.  My wife was 200 miles from home when it happened to her.  I drove our pickup down to see if I could possibly fix it but there was no way I could splice in a new piece because of the extent of the corrosion.  Many of those lines in that ABS block area were paper thin. 

I gave her the pick up truck to continue to use pulling the trailer (she was travelling on business as a catastrophe insurance adjuster) and I managed to gingerly drive the truck home after pinching off the burst line with a pair of vise-grips.  That was the only way to build any pressure in the alternate circuit. 

I think GM has a problem with that master cylinder as well because we could not get any braking with one line burst.  We have 206k on the truck now and given the price of new trucks I will keep this one going as long as I can.  I am about to embark on front end work (ball joints, bushings, pitman arms, idler arms, etc.) and replace all the moving parts in the steering and suspension because she's become loose as a goose.

How did you get stainless lines in there especially the one line that runs back to the rear axle is an itchbay to get at?  The right front line is a pain in the derierre as well.  I found that the cupronickel lines are reasonably easy to form bends in place and it was almost like pulling romex.  Big bends can be formed by hand and then use a little bending tool for the tight bends.

radio-active
User Rank
Iron
Re: Why are Air bags requiring the key switch on any way?
radio-active   3/4/2014 11:51:17 AM
NO RATINGS
Your air bags are not designed to protect you when you are parked. They are designed to deploy when you are moving, and under rapid de-acceleration, as in a collision.

Think about it, would you want your bags to deploy when your car gets bumped in a parking lot? In a lot of cases, air bag deployment TOTALS the car.

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
Jim_E   3/4/2014 11:25:49 AM
NO RATINGS
J. Williams, yes, I certainly did post a format complaint on the nhtsa site. 

You'd think that hearing all of these complaints about sudden brake failure would raise some alarm, but GM appears to be avoiding it somehow.  All of my lines were severly corroded at the ABS block, located under the drivers seat by the frame rail.  As you said, it wouldn't be something that you'd normally see when under the vehicle unless you were specifically looking for the ABS block.   I have never seen corrosion as bad as this on any vehicle!

I sure would like to at least be reimbursed for the money that I spent on the stainless lines.  My entire truck is starting to fall apart now (it is 14 years old) but I can't quite afford a new one at the moment, so I'll have to repair it piece by piece unless Chevy offers me a sweetheart deal on a new Silverado!

J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
J. Williams   3/4/2014 11:03:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Did you post a complaint to safercar.gov or http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov ?

My wife was driving our 2002 Suburban pulling a 32 ft travel trailer when she blew a line due to severe rusting.  She had no brakes whatsoever.  It would not build pressure in the alternate circuit.  Fortunately, she had the presence of mind to use the over-ride brake control for the electric trailer brakes to get the rig stopped.  GM is just claiming salt belt states and is trying to bury the problem.  The real issue was that the line that burst was on the left frame rail hidden from sight behind the left front tire and on top of the frame rail and subject to the severest corrosion.  The problem was that when I've been under the truck changing oil, etc. I never noticed the worst of it because it was hidden from view.

It took me an entire weekend of pulling things apart and snaking new tubing throughout but I replaced the old steel lines with copper-nickel tubing that should resist corrosion much better than the coated steel lines.  It would have been better if GM just paid a few dollars more and had stainless lines formed when the built the truck and we wouldn't have had to go through all this aggravation.  I am disgusted that GM would cheap out on a such a safety critical item.

Anyone who has a '99 through '03 Chev or GM truck should take a real close look at your steel brake lines, especially those on top of the left frame rail under the driver's feet.  You will need a light and an inspection mirror to get a good look at them.  Mine were flaking off rust in huge chunks.

J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Waiting for the truck brake line recall
J. Williams   3/4/2014 11:03:00 AM
Did you post a complaint to safercar.gov or http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov ?

My wife was driving our 2002 Suburban pulling a 32 ft travel trailer when she blew a line due to severe rusting.  She had no brakes whatsoever.  It would not build pressure in the alternate circuit.  Fortunately, she had the presence of mind to use the over-ride brake control for the electric trailer brakes to get the rig stopped.  GM is just claiming salt belt states and is trying to bury the problem.  The real issue was that the line that burst was on the left frame rail hidden from sight behind the left front tire and on top of the frame rail and subject to the severest corrosion.  The problem was that when I've been under the truck changing oil, etc. I never noticed the worst of it because it was hidden from view.

It took me an entire weekend of pulling things apart and snaking new tubing throughout but I replaced the old steel lines with copper-nickel tubing that should resist corrosion much better than the coated steel lines.  It would have been better if GM just paid a few dollars more and had stainless lines formed when the built the truck and we wouldn't have had to go through all this aggravation.  I am disgusted that GM would cheap out on a such a safety critical item.

Anyone who has a '99 through '03 Chev or GM truck should take a real close look at your steel brake lines, especially those on top of the left frame rail under the driver's feet.  You will need a light and an inspection mirror to get a good look at them.  Mine were flaking off rust in huge chunks.

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