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TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Modify at home
TJ McDermott   2/24/2014 10:44:05 AM
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This printer looks like one could easily modify it to get a larger workspace than 8x8x8.  Longer lead screws and support rails, change some timing belts...

Sub-$800 pricing is impressive!

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Modify at home
NadineJ   2/24/2014 5:04:33 PM
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Under $800 is impressive depending on what you get.  This looks suitable for limited educational fun and the occasional prototype.  It doesn't look as if it would hold up to heavy use.

A little more editing is needed in the article:

"Currently its creators have a Kickstarter campaign"

"the Kickstarter initiative ended without reaching the goal,"

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Modify at home
Charles Murray   2/24/2014 7:02:54 PM
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I agree, TJ, sub-$800 pricing is amazing. I'd like to see the products built by this 3D printer and, better yet, hold them in my hands.

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Maybe
Cadman-LT   2/24/2014 8:31:08 PM
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Cabe, thanks for the article. I finally might be able to afford one now...lol

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Modify at home
Cadman-LT   2/24/2014 8:38:18 PM
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Charles I agree. I have gotten some sample parts from other makers, they are impressive. If this is as good as I have seen then great. If not, then probably just for the home user that wants to make toys or parts without tolerances. As Nadine pointed out, it probably isn't for production, just general use. For the price though I wouldn't expect much more. Plus I think it looks pretty cool!

William K.
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Platinum
Assemble by people without any technical knowledge?
William K.   2/25/2014 10:03:30 AM
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So now we are offered a 3D printer for use by those with no technical knowledge? It seems that the pandering to those who choose to not learn anything about the tools they use has reached a new level. While simplifying assembly may be a good idea if it does not reduce reliability, why in the world should these tools be provided to those who are not willing to learn? Of course the profit motive is a main driver in this direction, and there are probably quite a few hobby users who do have technical understanding and just need a lower priced package to produce thier designs. That may be a better aspect to emphasise than the part about not needing any technical knowledge to assemble the system. 

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Assemble by people without any technical knowledge?
NadineJ   2/25/2014 6:13:00 PM
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@William K- Why do you think technical knowledge is important for the future of 3D printing? 

I think it's better if it's so easy/simple that anyone can create and use one.  When things stay "over the heads" of the masses, they're often not accepted or adopted.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Snap Together Printer
Greg M. Jung   2/25/2014 8:35:42 PM
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Interesting idea to allow the customer to snap together the printer themselves.  Reminds me of a furniture kit where 'some assembly is required'.  Perhaps the next generation printer will be a mobile version that can easity be folded into a smaller volume and then quickly be set up at another location.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Assemble by people without any technical knowledge?
William K.   2/25/2014 9:12:31 PM
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Nadine, the fact is that sometimes we would all be berrter off if the uneducated were not able to utilize some technologies. We wind up with all kinds of junk that contributes nothing to anybody's quality of life, but it still consumes resources in it's production. 

And why in the world should those who refuse to learn be handed all of the benefits that we who took the effort to learn have? Why in the world should laziness be rewarded? 

Making things so simple that "everybody can do it" is part of the reason that engineering no longer gets the respect that it once did. But there is still a big difference between being able to do something and being able to do it correctly.

 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Modify at home
Elizabeth M   2/26/2014 5:09:03 AM
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Does it come with Ikea-like instructions for assembly? For a non-mechanical genius like me, I thnk I would need something better! An interesting idea and the price is right, but if putting together a printer on your own is what makes it affordable, I think I will still have to wait a bit before jumping into this market.

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