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bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
BILLIARDS BALL COUNTER
bobjengr   4/22/2014 6:11:35 PM
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William, I admire your creativity.  Great post and very interesting "gadget".  I have a pool table in the basement and think I may give this assembly a try.  Again, great post.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
William K.   4/21/2014 7:57:08 PM
NO RATINGS
armorris,I agree with your comment 100%. At least a functional description of the code would increase the value of the posting a great deal. Of course I also see that using a short-product-life processor for a project where a very few digital logic ICs would work instead is sort of worthless.Why use a processor when a counter and a gate would do the same job? And actually provide a real engineering experience. Of course I realize that there is a lot more money to be made pushing processor development packages instead of multi-sourced logic chips.

Mr. Wirtel
User Rank
Gold
Re: Small Details Matter.
Mr. Wirtel   4/21/2014 4:49:06 PM
NO RATINGS
  William, I agree with you about needing two buttons to reset as it will help prevent an accidental reset. I think I read some where that the Ctrl-Alt- Del sequence was also developed as a combination that would never occur in normal usage and therefore would never be done accidently. Often simple tasks can result in simple errors.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/26/2014 12:33:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks a lot. I've enjoyed your stuff, too.

wgrill
User Rank
Iron
Re: Small Details Matter.
wgrill   2/26/2014 12:25:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I've read and enjoyed your stuff... and it is good stiff.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/26/2014 12:17:58 PM
NO RATINGS

The page I'm on is that the project needs to be reproducible by others with the necessary skills. I have 7 Gadget Freak projects and one magazine article. It irks me when I see a project that uses some kind of embedded code with little or no comments describing how the code works. Besides creating gadgets and projects myself, I like to learn from other peoples' projects, like yours. If your code was commented, I might learn something from it. I want people to learn from my code, or be able to rewrite it to run in whatever processor the builder is most comfortable with. Just because few other gadget makers adequately comment their code is no reason for me not to.

wgrill
User Rank
Iron
Re: Small Details Matter.
wgrill   2/25/2014 12:07:49 PM
NO RATINGS
This was my 50th article and 17th published gadget. I believe we are on different pages when considering what detail and what value is provided in a submittal such as this one. Consider some of the other articles both I have and others have submitted and published, I don't feel an amateur label.   

No offense taken and I hope none received..

  

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
William K.   2/24/2014 6:07:06 PM
NO RATINGS
D_A, really it is better to have the reset function use two buttons since that is a good way to prevent an accidental rest, which I have done with other equipment on a few occasions. So I would vote that the two button reset is a good choice.

I would also offer that the box did not need a PIC processor to deliver that functionality. The CD4510 is a handy up/down counter that needs no programming, and just by examining the circuit diagram the function is quite obvious. Plus it is a chip that will be around for a few more years, unlike the cute little micro chips that become obsolete a year after release, and are mostly single sourced. One can be hurt quite badly by using single sourced parts, I know first hand about that.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/24/2014 11:14:56 AM
NO RATINGS
I guess if you don't play billiards, you don't know what the gadget does. The ASM code has almost no comments in it, making it extremely difficult for someone else to figure out what the code is doing.

You'll notice in my GF projects that when I use a PIC microcontroller, the ASM code is heavily commented. Without the comments, even I would forget how the code works after a year or two.

Other than that, I think it's a nice project. I certainly appreciate the engineering talent that went into making it. Just please comment your code, so that the rest of us can learn from it.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Small Details Matter.
far911   2/23/2014 1:50:00 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree paying attention to minor details for future improvement is necessary.

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