HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: it's a start
shehan   1/31/2014 12:42:17 PM
NO RATINGS
@a.saji – today we are look at renewable energy sources, being in such a situation why do we have to waste our fuel resources. Why can't we save that for some other purpose? 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: it's a start
shehan   1/31/2014 12:41:09 PM
NO RATINGS
@NadineJ – Why do you think horsepower is more important than mileage for ordinary day to day traveling. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: it's a start
shehan   1/31/2014 12:40:01 PM
NO RATINGS
@Charles – I too don't see the logic behind this thinking, why do we need to use more fuel for the same distance we go. What about the roads we have, do we need much horsepower for day to day travelling. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: it's a start
shehan   1/31/2014 12:38:28 PM
NO RATINGS
@naperlou – yes even a rough driver would need a beast below 250Hp, I wonder if we are wasting our resources by trying to build anything over that.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: it's a start
naperlou   1/31/2014 12:14:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Jerry, there is one major thing wrong with your vision of the future.  If you look at the Tesla S you will see that it is several hundred pounds heavier than the car it competes with (both having similar horespower).  Now, the Tesla S uses lightweight materials and lots of new technology, and it is still heavier.  As a part of your argument, which I agree with, you point out that we need lighter, more aerodynamic cars.  I don't know if you remember the oil shocks of the 1970s.  All of a sudden the coefficient of drag became a selling point for automobiles in advertising.  In addition, conventional cars have become lighter (for the same size/features/horsepower), other than the German luxury brands (and the electrics).  Without a different storage mechanism for energy, the ICE will continue to dominate.  Perhaps hydrogen...

Jerry dycus
User Rank
Gold
Re: it's a start
Jerry dycus   1/31/2014 11:02:45 AM
NO RATINGS
I think Tesla showed exactly what the future motors will look like at 90 percent eff.  It also puts those mentioned in the rear view mirror because of it's massive, instant flat torque, power  from 0 rpm and smoothness..

Vs IC's than in cars are at best 10 percent eff because they rarely run in their eff range, part throttle eff.

The only eff ICE is a tiny 4-30 kw generator to recharge the E motor batteries for unlimited range at about 34 percent eff.

Next the need lighter, more aero vehicles to put these eff motors in.

Facts are in 20 yrs oil will be too expensive to burn and my EV's fuel cost is $.01/mile vs $.10/mile and up for ICE's and only going to get worse.

Vs I can use $700 of solar PV to cxharge mine for 20+ yrs.

So have fun with your dying, costly  ICE's as they become the buggy whips of the future. I'll do EV thank you.

 

 

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: North American Automakers, Start Your Engines
Charles Murray   1/31/2014 10:00:58 AM
NO RATINGS
You're absolutely right, blairk. This slideshow is geared more toward North American automakers. There's a good reason for that -- Chevy, Ford, Chrysler are still big on displaying their engines on stands at the Detroit Auto Show. Most of the European and Asian automakers do less of that. Similarly, the photos those companies share with the press are more about the exterior design of their products, and less about engines. It may be a cultural difference confined to auto shows. I suspect that it's easier to transport an engine and put it on a stand at the Detroit Auto Show if your facilities happen to be located in Detroit. You're right, though, European and Asian automakers have equally impressive engine technology. But since this was a photo deck coming directly from the Detroit Auto Show, we had to go with what was available.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: it's a start
GTOlover   1/31/2014 9:56:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Charles, us older folks remember the aenemic cars of the 1970's and 80's. To think that a turbocharged Buick V6 was all the rage in the late 80's for our perfomance fixation. Give credit to the automakers, I do not think they want to repeat the reputation they got during this time.

Small, gutless motors that really didn't give us that great of gas mileage! Who would want a full-sized car running a crappy V6 and only getting 24 MPG. Might as well keep driving the Chevy truck with the V8 and get 21 MPG.

Meanwhile the Japanese cars were coming out with high revving 4 bangers that could actually get good gas mileage! Toyota didn't become the #1 car manufacturer by continueing to sell their crap box from the 1970's!

blairk
User Rank
Iron
North American Automakers, Start Your Engines
blairk   1/31/2014 9:34:22 AM
NO RATINGS
The article should have been titled, "North American Automakers, Start Your Engines!" There is a lot of great new automotive technology coming out of Europe and Asia, too. Too bad the article did not include any. 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: it's a start
William K.   1/31/2014 9:33:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Nadine, The last time I was in Europe the fuel prices were over three times what they were in the US, and it was obvious that there were two kinds of car owners, those who chose to be careful about fuel consumption, and those who really did not care at all about fuel efficiency. The division was quite similar to those who were very wealthy versus everybody else. That winds up being similar to what I see here in the US.

So while many of us value fuel economy there are still quite a few who hold performance as the main goal.

The downside is that it seems that really good vehicle handling characteristics are reserved for cars with lots of power, while those cars that get much better mileage seem to be designed for octogenarian grandmothers trips to the corner grocery store. A smooth ride but poor vehicle handling, most obvious in the dominance of severe understeer. 

<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Researchers in Canada have developed a chin strap that harvests energy from chewing and can potentially power a digital earplug that can provide both protection and communication capabilities.
In case you haven't heard, the deadline to enter the 2014 Golden Mousetrap Awards is coming up fast Oct. 28! Have you entered yet?
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
A Tokyo company, Miraisens Inc., has unveiled a device that allows users to move virtual 3D objects around and "feel" them via a vibration sensor. The device has many applications within the gaming, medical, and 3D-printing industries.
In the last few years, use of CFD in building design has increased manifolds. Computational fluid dynamics is effective in analyzing the flow and thermal properties of air within spaces. It can be used in buildings to find the best measures for comfortable temperature at low energy use.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service