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tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Brings back fond memories
tekochip   1/29/2014 8:24:22 AM
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I loved my Commodore machines because you could do so much with them.  This was back in the days of brick and mortar, and yet hardware and software were available everywhere from any vendor.  We used to laugh at the price difference between the same exact same software for the different machines; PC $100, Apple $160, Commodore $40.  For those that wanted to dig into the machine the user manual included the schematic, memory map and kernel entry points.  In `86 Geos was released and I beefed my C64 up to 512K.  GEOS really flew on the C64, and it wasn't until about `90 that I finally retired my C64 and GEOS.  Then I bought the PC version of GEOS and kept that until `95.


AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re: Educative
AnandY   1/29/2014 4:55:16 AM
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On a different note, I didn't know that the first Macs used to run on Motorola processors. I think this is a classic example of how lack of vision can lead to missed opportunities. Looking at this, I can't help but wonder why Motorola were never able to give Intel a run for their money. Seems like they had enough head start.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Brings back fond memories
Elizabeth M   1/29/2014 4:34:51 AM
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Ann, it sounds like you are even more of a Mac enthusiast than me! I have defended Macs in much the same way over the years to friends who complain about the price. I agree they are so worth it. Whenever i don't have my Mac handy and have to work on a PC the experience just doesn't compare.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re: Those were the days
AnandY   1/29/2014 3:59:24 AM
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Am not part of the generation that touched this particular Mac to do any sort of work but I have had a chance to try it up close. After waiting for about 5 minutes for the computer to boot I gave up and left it in peace. Right now am working with 8GB of RAM and even this still gives me problems at times. I can't even start to think of using DRAM let alone using it in KBs.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 128K of RAM
Nancy Golden   1/28/2014 8:22:16 PM
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Ha Ha - I am right there with ya CTHP! And how about adding another serial port? Kinda like Tim the toolman - it's not only having more power or more stuff - it's popping that baby open and adding them yourself!

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The PC Good Ole Days
Charles Murray   1/28/2014 8:15:32 PM
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I agree about the aversion to Macs in the early days, Nancy. I had the same aversion. I was always afraid Apple was on the verge of collapse.

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Not just a power supply
etmax   1/28/2014 7:04:35 PM
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The power supply board shown is actually at the very least ~12kV high tension for the CRT, vertical and horizontal deflection drivers for the CRT (maybe 5-10W) and (I'm guessing on this one) the video driver circuitry.

phantasyconcepts
User Rank
Silver
Re: Brings back fond memories
phantasyconcepts   1/28/2014 3:58:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I never said Macs were not worth the money, just that they are higher in price than an equally furbished PC. I stand firm on my suggestion to put the ROM on an adapter card and sell it with a copy of the OS. This would cut their manufacturing costs to less than $10 per Mac card, allow them to sell more units, and increase their market share. they could, actually, even put that ROM on a USB device to allow laptop users and those who do not want to open their PCs to run MacOS. Then, upgrading hardware becomes as simple as buying a new computer with the specs needed to run MacOS and Mac software. Apple can then concentrate on revenue streams that have a higher profit margin than computer hardware.

CTHP
User Rank
Silver
128K of RAM
CTHP   1/28/2014 3:53:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Do you remember how upgrading the RAM from 128KB to 512KB made it feel like the computer was more powerful? (or just user pride) Sure, longer programs could be stored in memory but just sitting there, the computer was somehow 'born again' new.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Brings back fond memories
Ann R. Thryft   1/28/2014 1:29:39 PM
NO RATINGS
phantasyconcepts, as a Mac buyer and user from Day 1, I know full well what they cost. For this user, they were worth it, the way a Porsche is worth it over a Ford. I've never been able to do much at all with DOS or Windows (not to mention prehistoric OSes like CP/M), so I don't share your experience. But more important, Macs were worth a higher price than those machines the way a fully functioning car is worth more money than a donkey cart. Early on, the Mac had a better, more-friendly OS (that was therefore easier and faster to learn) in only 1 meg of ROM than Windows could do in 10 megs of ROM.
And they continue to be worth it. I used my MacPlus, upgraded as far as possible in HW and SW, for work full-time all the way until 1995 when the Web made it impossible because of memory and software limitations. That's 10 years from one machine. I still write on System 9.2.2 on a PowerPC desktop with a 266-MHz G3, and use an OSX laptop for everything else. I don't much like what happened in OSX, but it still beats Windows hands down as far as I'm concerned. Price simply isn't the most important thing when it comes to the user experience.



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