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NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Brings back fond memories
NadineJ   1/28/2014 12:22:35 PM
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I remember the old Commodore computers.  My grade school had them.

You may have gotten more for your dollar with a PC but I think one key thing that helped Apple's success was the attitude and lean towards creativity.

My computer lab teachers in grade school, on the Commodores, discouraged anything outside of the dry, boring lesson plan.  If I tried ANYTHING different or creative, I was told it was a waste of time.  The teacher in the lab that had Apples encouraged us to create our own projects.  The wilder the better. 

I learned that PC users were stuffy conformists.  Apple users were rebellious innovators.  As a teen, which would you want to be?  Practically, I know that other computers and tablets may be stronger and a better value but emotionally, I'm tied to Macs.

burn0050
User Rank
Silver
Re: Brings back fond memories
burn0050   1/28/2014 12:10:57 PM
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Well, @phantasyconcepts, you can always build a Hackintosh. The OS is cheap after that!

 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Memory lane indeed
Elizabeth M   1/28/2014 12:06:55 PM
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Wow, this makes me feel old! I remember the original Mac...a friend of mine´s brother (who eventually went on to work at Apple many years later) was an early adopter and had one of these babies...I remember thinking it was so cool and always wanting one. I finally bought my first Mac--a Performa--about 10 years later, and never looked back. Until this day I have only ever bought one PC and it was an emergency back-up computer when my Mac was being serviced. I will always be a lifelong fan.

phantasyconcepts
User Rank
Silver
Re: Brings back fond memories
phantasyconcepts   1/28/2014 11:18:35 AM
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Ann, Apple might have billed the Mac as being "for the rest of us," but even then, the pricing model put it out of reach of many Americans. My parents bought a Commodore VIC-20 for my younger brother, little sister and I to share in 1985 or 1986. I was already in high school and the school used Apple computers. I could not get into a computer class, but I still wanted to learn. I stuck with the Commodore brand, buying a 128D in 1988 and keeping my Commodore until 1993 when I could no longer find software or hardware for it. Even the magazines had stopped publication. I was forced into the PC realm because Macs were still too expensive. After getting ripped off on my Tandy MPC, I vowed not to buy another prebuilt computer on a credit card. I started building my own PCs in 1996 and kept doing so until the pre-built PCs came down to the price of my old Commodore computers - under $500 - and then I tried a couple. Of course, they sucked, and they rarely had decent hardware and they were all preloaded with the latest version of the crappiest operating system ever created as a knockoff of MacOS, but they worked for a few months. When I got tired of them crashing or getting slow, I copied my usable files off of them and upgraded them to Linux (Slackware Linux, specifically, since that is what I prefer). Over the years, I must have invested $2000 to $5000 in PCs and have 14 that I can power up and run today. If I had bought Macs, I might have two for that price, and probably would not be able to do half as much with them. Don't get me wrong, MacOS is something I would love to run, but I just won't buy the hardware. If Apple made an add-on card with the Mac ROM and bundled it with MacOS, I would buy it in a heartbeat to run on a PC that was 'Designed for Windows 8'. I just can't see spending four times as much for an I7 Mac as I can for an I7 PC with comparable hardware.

phantasyconcepts
User Rank
Silver
Re: The PC Good Ole Days
phantasyconcepts   1/28/2014 10:52:28 AM
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My PCs get upgraded to Linux when the warranty expires. I do not buy PCs with Windows 8, and I do not want one - unless I buy it for the cheap hardware so I can wipe the hard drive and upgrade it to Linux. I might consider it then.

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
The beginning of Apple's change
Jim_E   1/28/2014 10:14:18 AM
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That machine was the beginning of Apple's change away from the open architecture of the Apple II series into the land of the walled garden.  I had a //e at the time and was not happy with Apple's new direction.  I loved having slots in my computer and the ability to expand and upgrade.  The Mac was not for me.

In college, I went on to buy an Apple IIgs which had an operating system ( GS/OS System 6.0.1 ) that was even slicker than the Macintosh at that time.  I read that Apple used that version of GS/OS as the development outline for the next version of the Macintosh system software.

My IIgs (which I still have) was loaded up with expansion cards, an external 105MB SCSI drive, and I even had the "PC Transporter" card, which was an IBM PC compatible PC on an expansion card, letting me run IBM PC programs at the time.  With the color dot matrix Imagewriter II printer, I was good to go all through college.

After getting my first job out of college, I realized that the time had come to get a new computer.  I was mad that Apple had dropped the II series and still didn't like the Macs at the time, so I bought a 486/33 and I've been in PC land ever since.  Apple hardware is pretty, and my wife and kids have some of their handheld stuff, but I'm stubborn and still refuse to go back, so I'm PC and Android now.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The PC Good Ole Days
Nancy Golden   1/28/2014 9:48:10 AM
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More than consider, Warren - I never thought I would have a Mac but now I do. It plays "Luke, I am your father" when I boot up (just kidding). I find some things about it very annoying but I find Windows 8 even more so...

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The PC Good Ole Days
warren@fourward.com   1/28/2014 9:13:37 AM
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Windows 8 made a lot of us consider going to the dark side of the force (Mac).

Steve Heckman
User Rank
Gold
Used one at School
Steve Heckman   1/28/2014 8:45:26 AM
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When I took clases with University of Maryland in the Philippines, we had original IBM PC's. When I took classes with SIU in Germany, we had three Macs we could sign out and take home to work on projects. I remember one was a 512K version, which I needed for a large PERT chart I created. In all I was impressed, compared to the Zenith 286-based PC the Air Force was then buying (with Multimate). I had a Commodore 64 for persoanl use, until paid $1200 for a single floppy "Laser Compact PC" at Sears. For a class I wrote a Program in GW Basic to solve a differential equation that took an hour to run (at 10 mhz). Looking back, it was fun to participate in the early days of PC's.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: The PC Good Ole Days
a.saji   1/28/2014 3:38:15 AM
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Obviously by the looks it really makes us feel how on earth did they work on these machines but I feel those machines are the best since its based on them only we figured out new things and what and when to update     

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