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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: High school class
William K.   1/27/2014 10:12:20 AM
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The concept of utilizing a virus structure to enhance a power generation function is one more example of taking a hint from nature and copying it. Now it may inspire other researchers to see how they can use a version of a natural process to acomplish some new function. 

It will be interesting to see if it can be scaled up to commercial production levels.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: High school class
Elizabeth M   1/27/2014 9:52:31 AM
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Thanks for the word-choice feedback, although tabloid reporting was the furthest thing from my mind! But as always, I will keep any and all constructive criticism from readers in mind when writing my next story. I hope the word choice folks seemed to disagree with did not keep people from absorbing the gist of the story and reading about the technology it covers.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Use of viruses for fabrication
William K.   1/9/2014 7:33:48 PM
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@armorris. Those are some very important questions that you have presented, and they point out the importance of considering secondary effects of an activity, as well as effects further of than that. I certainly hope that those new industrial viruses are not dangerous or hostile, since we certainly don't need any problems like that.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A new breakthrough?
Charles Murray   1/6/2014 5:36:28 PM
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Yikes! Two to three times the energy of lithium-air would be a prodigious figure. No one really has a handle on the real world specific energy of lithium-air (as far as I know), but the theoretical figure is about 11,000 Wh/kg, according to Wikipedia. Two to 3X would be a amazing.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Use of viruses for fabrication
armorris   1/6/2014 2:00:05 PM
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Do these viruses take a lot of time to grow? Do the viruses die off when the fabrication of the battery electrode is complete? Could these viruses infect the envorinment in some way?

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: High school class
William K.   1/6/2014 12:58:31 PM
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Thanks for a very interesting post about what does look like a very useful development. But "leverages"?

I agree that the sentence is not the best, and the use of "leveraging" instead of a more accurate description has become very boring, in my evaluation. 

A better description could have been " a new battery technology using viruses and building on the nanowires breakthrough", which is a much more accurate description and sounds more technically literate.

Not trying to be nasty or anything like that, but as a publication that represents itself to be quite smart, it is better to not copy the word usage of thosetabloid reporters who follow every daily fad.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Star Trek
warren@fourward.com   1/6/2014 9:28:29 AM
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OK. Someone has been watching Star Trek! They had bio batteries that essentially caught a cold. Jean Luc Picard must be rolling over in his condo!

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
High school class
Battar   1/6/2014 9:06:17 AM
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"a new bio-battery leveraging viruses that has two to three times..."

You would never get that sentence past your high school English teacher. There are better ways of putting ideas into clear English. 

Why is every innovation in battery technology advertised as the next best thing for EVs? The article suggests going from batteries 2-3 centimeters in size to multi-KW EV applications. Why not aim for phones or laptop computers as targets of opportunity on the way?

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Organic Manufacturing
Greg M. Jung   1/3/2014 9:41:39 PM
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Very clever to use organic entities to help with the fabrication of these battery components and to improve efficiency.  I would imagine the next step will be to genetically modify the viruses to 'program' them to create specific battery substructure shapes to further improve electrical performance.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
A new breakthrough?
naperlou   1/3/2014 2:39:02 PM
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Elizabeth, this is indeed an interesting development.  If they can use this process to make the batteries cheaper, then it would be a real breakthrough. 

The question I have is: will these batteries have a higher energy density, and this a lower weight?  That would be something as well.



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