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Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: For the majority of production people
Cabe Atwell   5/8/2014 10:37:22 PM
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I like how Apple uses what part of the year their products were manufactured, almost like a vintage wine.

jhankwitz
User Rank
Platinum
For the majority of production people
jhankwitz   3/21/2014 12:35:56 PM
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The Mac Pro is obviously being produced for the majority of production people, not the fringes involved in speciality activities.  This is in keeping with the majority of Apple products.  The speciality folks can build what they need using other parts to build a Hackentosh or whatever.

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Re: Another great teardown
etmax   1/8/2014 10:18:37 PM
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Hi Naperlou, off topic for this thread but I believe in Linux and the ethos behind it and would jump the Windoze boat in a flash if it weren't for the tools I need to run.

I've got Linux on my desktop as an alternate OS for the times windoze decides to put a file lock on something that survives a reboot. It's a great debug/repair tool :-)

Windoze biggest problem (apart from being made & marketed by a convicted monopolist) is that no one as MS knows how it works. I see registry settings that have multiple instances, some changed by GUI and some not and during start up it initialises some things multiple times. Take th cleanup icon timer on XP. It asks every 60 days if you want your desktop cleaned and there are 3 different registry settings for it only one of which is altered by the GUI used to turn the feature off making me think there may be a 4th because mine still puts up the message every 60 days.

THen there's check boxes that show the state of some function that aren't read by the OS so the function can be shown as on or off while it is in the opposite state. The fix is the disable then enable the feature from the GUI so the internal registry setting and displayed state are the same.

Why would I not use WIndows own anti virus? It has a registry setting that when set allows an application to silently disable the virus checker -- SAY WHAT??

Anyhow, I long for the day that the Linux community settles on one distribution for PC style desktops and the world then switches.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Another great teardown
naperlou   1/8/2014 2:49:37 PM
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etmax, yes, my sone does mostly gaming (he also uses two screens).  He does do some CAD as well.  My older son just built his own.  He is a Linux guy, period.  What he is finding is that there are more and more games running on Linux.  He is also a Linux bigot (did I mention that?).  He has a laptop with discrete graphics as well, but he just had to build his own machine.  Actually, he does Linux support for a cloud vendor. 

I am working on a machine for computational purposes.  I am putting Linux on it, of course. 

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Re: Another great teardown
etmax   1/8/2014 4:54:18 AM
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Hi Naperlou, that's an interesting thought but I suspect your son does this for gaming which is the singly most perfomance intensive thing you can do with a pC and new games always stretch the limits of what's possible leading to that rapid upgrade path where you lay down >$1000 every time. The GPU typically has much greater performance than the CPU too. This is the domain of the purpose built PC system based on windows usually.

Another power hungry use is video rendering although here they tend to build bigger and bigger farms of the same or similar spec'd machines because it gives a more cost effective increase given that this task can be very nicely split into small parcels that each machine handles. This is either Windows, Mac or Linux although Linux I think gives the best power performance and the HW is a, IBM type PC due to cost unless you have really deep pockets and are Mac crazy (no disrespect intended).

Then you get to 3D modeling where you tend to get the best machine available at the time and just replace it when you feel it's not fast enough which is usually every 2 years or so. This is where this machine is targeted I believe.

Then you get my use case where I to 2D (PCB design) 3D modelling of smaller things as an adjunct to system design as well as code generation and dbugging and you typically get a mid to high end machine and keep it for 4-5 years. I need to rely on Windoze due to what's available in SW. I could quite happily use this machine if it ran Windoze but it would be a tad expensive for the task.

Then there's everyone else where you do web browsing word processing or any other task where you don't need a GPU and a 2.5GHz CPU is more than enough so this machine is a bad fit.

Of course then there's the user that just has to have this because it's cool and we can't knock that as they probably have the income to buy it and still feed the family so who's to begrudge them that :-) So this is also a fit for this machine and probably the most common customer :-)

This analasys is the old horses for courses method :-), it's what marketroids use to drive the engineering team.

Reliabilityguru
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Another great teardown
Reliabilityguru   1/6/2014 10:59:45 AM
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Very interesting and I'm curious to see what's inside the CPU package.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Another great teardown
naperlou   1/3/2014 2:24:57 PM
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NadineJ, this is indeed a fun process.  These guys are a blast. 

I think they have a good point that while the graphics cards are very good, the fact that they are not easily replaceable is a real problem.  Graphics cards evolve more quickly and they get replaced often.  My son, who I often reference, builds his own PC based systems.  He started out with one card, got a second and bridged them together.  Got a much more powerful card and replaced the two.  For Christmas he got an even more powerful card (still single).  He does lots of graphics intensive stuff including games and CAD.  He can easily respond to improvements in this area (often in a few minutes).

The idea of craming that much into such a small space is really not very useful, and I am sure it drives up the price.  That said, it is a cool machine.  It should be for the price.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Another great teardown
NadineJ   1/3/2014 11:33:56 AM
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I've been waiting for this one.  Thanks for another fabulous teardown with great details and a sense of humour.

I'm not surprised that some of the technology is similar to the new MacBook Pro Retina and MacBook Air. 

Non-proprietary screw!  Sounds like the beginning of a revolution.



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