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Debera Harward
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Re: Not "the cost", but rather the value.
Debera Harward   1/13/2014 2:30:28 AM
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William, agreed that definitely the cost of these smart homes currently are high as compared to the benefits but usually what happens is that initially every new technology is expensive and when the public accepts it its price drops down because of mass production i am having a feel that in future when these will become popular definitely cost will be reduced as well.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Not "the cost", but rather the value.
William K.   1/11/2014 8:37:43 PM
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Charles, the smartphones reduce the cost of control and certainly increase the convenience in using the features, but they are not really increasing the benefit, and hence the value. Certainly there are lots of really cool things that can be done remotely, but most of the "benefit" is in the "cool" factor. And at that point a lot of folks ar not willing to spend the money, including me.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Not "the cost", but rather the value.
Charles Murray   1/10/2014 5:53:59 PM
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Agreed, William K. There's been little value up to now. To Cabe's point, though, I think the value is starting to happen because of the ability to link to those smart mobile devices.

William K.
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Platinum
Not "the cost", but rather the value.
William K.   1/10/2014 4:52:17 PM
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Reading it a second time I saw the statement that "the reason more households haven't adopted it is the cost", and it would seem that assertion is incorrect.

Smart home technology has not been adopted wholesale because of the lack of value, not the high price. The claimed benefits are simply not great enough to merit either the cost or the effort to add them. Of course the fact that any system will probably be obsolete in two or three years does increase the perceived price of ownership a bit. And if any part of the system fails to deliver the touted benefits it is quite likely that the whole concept will not have a second chance. 

So really, while quite a few are hoping that it becomes "the next big thing", the fact is that very few feel such a need for these systems. Most people feel that they already have enough technical distractions around.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Smartphones will be the driver
Charles Murray   1/8/2014 9:07:50 PM
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Great article, Cabe. I think you nailed it when you said that the driver will be the proliferation of smartphones and other smart mobile devices.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Infrastructure lagging behind
Debera Harward   1/7/2014 10:18:48 AM
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One of the biggest and most appealing advantage that i found in these system is for elderly and disabled residents there are voice command system that can control functions like lock doors, operate telephones,scheduling an automated task like watering the plants and many more .

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Infrastructure lagging behind
Debera Harward   1/7/2014 10:15:39 AM
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Definitely smart homes will provide many advantages to customers than only they are going to move towards it . It povides conveneince with this system users can easily access to intercom, music, multimedia and many other electronic devices. There is an integrated hard drive that allows users to listen music and watch videos all over the house . Secondly it provides security with the help of cameras, sensors smart homes may also use key cards or fingerprint identification

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Infrastructure lagging behind
Debera Harward   1/7/2014 10:10:44 AM
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Cabe this article is really worth reading it . Smart Home system uses automation and modern buiding technique to give people living in homes a level of comfort zone. In smart home system automation works as a key design goal.

bobjengr
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Platinum
Re: Infrastructure lagging behind
bobjengr   1/5/2014 11:31:06 AM
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Agree Notarboca--I am very interested in "smart home" technology and how retrofit might factor into our 2014, 2015 financial planning.  We have been in our house for thirty-eight (38) years--love the "hood" and probably will never move.  Our house was built in 1953 and certainly has not had the benefit relative to this technology.  It is up to current local electrical codes due to my efforts in having certain grounding issues corrected but otherwise original construction.  I feel the "smart home"technology is definitely the wave of the future but the cost of retrofit for existing homes might be prohibitive.  I think also, as mentioned, this would be a great area of investigation for a consulting engineer to take on. Great post Cabe--very informative.   

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: More Toys
tekochip   1/3/2014 2:05:39 PM
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I strongly recommend seeing Buster Keaton's "The Electric House".  Many of today's ideas are not so new, however it's interesting to see that outrageous and impossible technology in 1922 is commonplace today.  So commonplace that you might not even realize it was supposed to be a gag.  As always, Keaton is brilliant in the film, too.
 
Another film that eerily portends the future in such a way that modern viewers won't even realize the satire is Chaplin's 1936 "Modern Times".


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