HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
Ralphy Boy
User Rank
Platinum
Memories...
Ralphy Boy   12/26/2013 12:33:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the memories Mark...

I was a VW freak back in the 70s. The list of awesome bugs and buses I owed is now flashing before my eyes. A 65' beetle, and a 60' delivery bus that had spent its first few years as a TV repair shop runner in good old Germany gave me the best street cred that I could afford at the time. I also owned a 60' Karman Ghia, and assorted other beetles.

One thing they all had in common while I owned them was that there were a couple spare distributor caps in the glove box.

Those carbon traces were a constant problem, and since I did a lot of woods cruzin I'm sure it was worse that the average strictly street driver would deal with. Sometimes I could wipe away the dust and the engine would get better for a bit, but usually the traces were forming on hair line cracks in the Bakelite of the cap. I'm guessing running way hot... then trying to float across a huge puddle is not the best way to treat a cheap used car.

Slightly different root cause but very similar in the cap failure issue. I will say that I've not changed a distributor cap in at least 25 years...

You also reminded me of hitting the rotor and cap contacts with some emery to clean up the burning and corrosion for good measure... Ahh... The good ole days.  

Turbineman
User Rank
Gold
Re: Non-Optimal design. Good enough for "Made-by-Monkeys"
Turbineman   12/23/2013 11:29:09 AM
Ah yes........moisture in the cap.  Back in the early 80's, my neighbor came knocking on my door at 7:00am looking for my help.  He was late for work because his car wouldn't start.  It had been raining all night and still coming down, so I suspected moisture was shorting out the distributor cap.  I pulled the cap and wiped off the interior and exterior, and put it back.  Engine still wouldn't start.  As this Ford Fiesta was approx. 5 years old, I suspected the cap material was no longer as dielectric as when new.  I pulled the cap again, took into my kitchen, and baked it in the oven at 250°F for 10 minutes.  Rushed it across the street before it could cool and put it back on.  Engine started right up.  I told him to pick up a new cap on his way home from work that night.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Non-Optimal design. Good enough for "Made-by-Monkeys"
Amclaussen   12/23/2013 10:46:38 AM
Another case for a "Made by Monkeys" blog!

(Thanks GM for keeping us entertained with your engineering blunders. BTW, thanks to ALL of them, as they keep lowering and lowering design practices!).

If the distributor cap is not simetrical (electrically speaking), as is the case with this design, it will always fail at that particular cylinder.  In other words, that Cylinder will always be the weak link in the chain.

The reason for this is the bad design practices resulting from a mediocre lay-out of the engine components inside a too-tight engine compartment.  Would the engine compartment have been designed with proper engineering, it woulndn't have required a flattened, side exitFlat, side exit distributor cap distributor cap to begin with...

But being that present day designs made extremely fast, by people that has very little actual experience (albeit posessing great AutoCad dexterity, that produces extremely compact-but failure prone designs!).

As for the cap and rotor design, OEM not always is the best. In this particular engine, you can replace the rotor and cap with a much better fabricated one (better materials and better overall dielectrical design) made by ACCEL, sold as a "performance" part, Part Number: 130141 "Heavy Duty".

That part will cost you 20 bucks (the garden variety, equivalent to the OEM is about 9.99).  Either you can buy two of the std. ones and change them sooner,or get the performance oriented one and expect twice (or more) service time. Amclaussen.

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Lumus and eyeSight have partnered to create consumer-grade devices that offer all the prime functions of smart glasses without the bulk.
VisLab joins the autonomous car effort with the DEEVA prototype.
NASA and Boeing developed a huge, carbon composite cryogenic fuel tank for deep space missions, and started testing it last month. The 18-ft cryotank will enable heavy-lift launch vehicles to send both humans and robots into deep space.
Focus on Fundamentals -- a new Design News webinar series -- kicks off April 29 with How to Select Drives for Robotics Applications. Don't miss it!
Research and other advancements in the realms of robotics, diagnostic and treatment devices, nanotechnology, and medical implants may one day make humans superior versions of their natural selves.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service