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taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Re: Robotic Suit
taimoortariq   12/24/2013 10:04:15 PM
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Mrdon, it is really impressive as well. I am sure you will also like the Japanese version of it as well. They have raised the bars by also including the upper torso support.

Pubudu
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Robotic Suit
Pubudu   12/27/2013 2:07:34 PM
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Habib, Mardon, Many thanks for the links which will enhance the insights of the article. 

Pubudu
User Rank
Platinum
Re: BETTER HUMAN
Pubudu   12/27/2013 2:13:24 PM
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Very true bobjengr, This is where we all engineers should pay attention in innovation in helping human lives.

And Elizabeth. Many thanks for sharing those info like you always do.

Pubudu
User Rank
Platinum
Re: shockingly cool
Pubudu   12/27/2013 2:20:48 PM
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Great point NadineJ, I also believe that the prices of those should be affordable to the public in order to get the maximum out of the innovation otherwise it will only be a just a innovation which has no value. 

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: shockingly cool
NadineJ   12/29/2013 4:00:43 PM
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Pubudu-That reminds me of something my teacher used to say..."if you sketch something that can't be prototyped, you need to change your majour to Fine Art."

Some things are meant for niche markets but I think it's important for medical breakthroughs to reach the masses and benefit all.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Artificial Retina
notarboca   12/31/2013 7:20:46 PM
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Think I'll check out Natcore's web page; the idea of an artificial retina is intriguing, and could be a viable treatment for many people.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Artificial Retina
Elizabeth M   1/2/2014 9:08:28 AM
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Hi, notarboca. The artificial retina is interesting for sure. I actually wrote a separate story about it if you want more info: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?doc_id=268160

But of course the website should tell you even more than that. Good luck in your search.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Quite an interesting connection
William K.   1/3/2014 5:49:56 PM
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It is an interesting collection and it certainly can benefit a lot of people. BUT not all engineers can or should focus on this area. There is a great deal of insight and understanding needed to arrive at a design that is better thanb  "peg ;eg" of a hundred yars ago. The kinematics of human motion are quite a challenge, and even just the selection of materials compatible with human phisiology is a big effort. 

Besdies all of that there are two other considerations, the first is that I am not employed to develop wonderful prosthetics, and so it would not be honest to my employers to work on projects not in their business. They have a lot of other engineering work for me to do. And the second consideration is that if all engineers started creating prosthetic designs, the pay level would drop so much that they would mostly move to other fields if they could. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Robotic leg
Charles Murray   1/3/2014 6:52:22 PM
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It's amazing to see what the microprocessor can do in terms of providing balance. Dean Kamen's Segway used microprocessors to balance a two-wheeled vehicle, and I always thought that was amazing. But the robotoic leg shown here is presumably more complicated than a Segway, and has to supply balance in a wider variety of potential scenarios.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robotic leg
Cabe Atwell   5/21/2014 11:18:51 PM
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I've seen the Ekso Bionic Suit in a demonstration and all I have to say is that it's incredible. With very little training disabled persons will be able to walk again.

 

But, I suggest starting with the soul.

 

 

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