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naperlou
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Surprising
naperlou   12/19/2013 9:14:05 AM
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Chuck, as the last slide mentions, many engineers don't fit the mold.  It is a very interesting slide show.  When I was at the University of Maryland in the 1970s I remember meeting the quarterback of the team who, I was told, was a Rhodes Scholar. 

While many of these people do not "fit the mold", I did experinece a situation where you could tell who did what based on their looks.  In the 1980s I was working on a large Army project.  There the officers did look (had a body type) that matched their profession.  The engineers we generally smaller and often wore glasses.  I wonder if that was a part of the screening process.

richnass
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Re: Surprising
richnass   12/19/2013 4:52:42 PM
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So are we saying that cheering pays better than engineering?

I'm happy about the Phil McConkey reference. He was a vocal guy on the 1986 Giants that captured Super Bowl XXI (isn't it funny the things we remember?).

a.saji
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Silver
Re: Surprising
a.saji   12/19/2013 11:05:20 PM
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@richnass: Wow if its so I would change my job role altogether. Shouting to a rhythm is not that difficult.  

Nancy Golden
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Re: Surprising
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 12:23:01 PM
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@richnass "So are we saying that cheering pays better than engineering?"

Surprisingly - much the opposite is true. Cheerleaders are paid very little and sacrifice a lot to do what they do: Average Salary


I really appreciated seeing these women breaking stereotypes and pursuing engineering careers.


Charles Murray
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Re: Surprising
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:17:07 PM
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Since you're familiar with the New York Giants, Rich, I should mention that another old Giant was an engineer. Reserve quarterback Randy Dean from the late 1970s, was an industrial engineer from Northwestern.

Charles Murray
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Re: Surprising
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:09:36 PM
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I agree that the "mold" is flawed, naperlou. None of the people pictured in this slide show would fit the mold.

jhankwitz
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Platinum
Options
jhankwitz   12/20/2013 8:51:11 AM
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Any student on an athletic career path would be wise to get a backup professional education.  A very small percentage makes it into pro sports due to an extremely wide variety obstacles.  There are far more positions available for engineers, doctors, accountants, and lawyers than there are professional for professional sports players.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   12/20/2013 10:16:33 AM
jhankwitz

I agree. I have two sons who play high school basketball and they're thoughts are on becoming NBA players in the future. Although they play good basketball, my wife and I always stress academics as the real focus while they're in school. As you mentioned its quite difficult to become a pro athlete because of the strong competition among players. Therefore, chosing a career as a doctor, lawyer, or engineer is easily obtainable than becoming an athlete and can provide a comfortable lifestyle as well. As the slides depict, these remarkable athletes and cheerleaders have an engineering career to fall back on which truly makes them superstars in sports.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Options
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 12:25:50 PM
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jhankwitz, you make a great observation: "As the slides depict, these remarkable athletes and cheerleaders have an engineering career to fall back on which truly makes them superstars in sports."


Which also makes them excellent role models for our kids!

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   12/20/2013 9:23:06 PM
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Nancy,

I agree. These remarkable folks are truly role models for today's kids. My wife and I always point out two our two teenage sons having aspirations to become NBA some of the players have law, physics, or engineering degrees. If something were to happen where they could not play their sport, they can still have decent careers to support their families.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Options
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 9:34:36 PM
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...Or a second career after retiring from sports. It also tears down the notion that athletes lack in the brain department which is of course far from the truth.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   12/20/2013 9:47:55 PM
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Nancy,

Another good point. The body can only take so much pounding as it becomes older. A second career will allow the brain to continue to grow via problem solving tech/engineering problems. Some of the plays athletes execute requires a good amount of brain power: so having an analytical mind from engineering helps tremendously.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Options
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 9:52:26 PM
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I agree mrdon. Actually, I was very surprised to learn the mental aspects of pro football - just look at the playbooks they have to memorize along with the ability to adjust to variations as a play unfolds...

mrdon
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Re: Options
mrdon   12/20/2013 10:00:42 PM
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Nancy Golden

Playbooks are technical and abstract in nature because of the various symbols used to represent players, positions, and movements. Engineers, as you know, deals with abstraction everyday in their work. Therefore, an athlete with an engineering background can interpret the abstraction to make a winning play. Good observation!

Nancy Golden
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Re: Options
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 10:08:26 PM
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Thanks mrdon - actually - some of those plays look like wiring diagrams or even pcboards when you first glance at them lol

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   12/20/2013 10:12:16 PM
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Nancy Golden

I'm an electrical engineer and I have to scratch my head on some of the elaborate plays the announcers show during the halftime show analysis. Yes, they do look like wiring diagrams or pcbboard traces.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Options
Nancy Golden   12/20/2013 10:18:46 PM
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As a test engineer, I'm afraid I have probably scribbled down a circuit or two on a napkin at lunch that you would have scratched your head over also :)

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Options
Pubudu   12/25/2013 1:31:07 AM
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Nancy It's really interesting, I do believe that Football is a game where it uses lot of brain it's not only a heard playing. Still I also would like to learn more about it. 

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Options
Pubudu   12/25/2013 1:17:19 AM
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Very true Mrdon You are pointing a great point I also believe that sports will make a successful man.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   1/20/2014 1:09:48 PM
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Pubudu

Thanks. Sports is definitely a discipline based activity that helps the mind and body. Adding this type of conditioning along with a strong Academic background will enhance a high school student's career path with job options in the future.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Re: Options
Greg M. Jung   12/24/2013 5:09:09 PM
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I concur with making academics the real focus during the school year.  Even if a student athelete is fortunate enough to become a professional athlete, time is not on their side.  Injury or retirement in their 30's is a common outcome.  A person should to continue to have revenue generating options for the next several decades of their life and a good academic degree can make this happen.

Charles Murray
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Re: Options
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:05:48 PM
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MrDon, tell your sons that Danny Granger, currently of the Indiana Pacers, is a civil engineer.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Options
mrdon   1/20/2014 12:32:50 PM
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Charles,

I mostly definitely will tell them. Danny is a good basketball player and who would ever thought he is a civil engineer. Truly amazing!!!

Measurementblues
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Silver
Sports should adopt real technology
Measurementblues   12/20/2013 9:00:49 AM
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So says Ransom Stephens, see his article

Sports should adopt real technology where he argues that it's time for the NFL to give up those chains for measuring first downs.

ChuckMahoney
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Gold
engineers?
ChuckMahoney   12/20/2013 10:45:19 AM
Calling someone an engineer simply because they went to engineering school makes as much sense as saying all English majors are novelists. 

 

Interestingly all three cheerleaders are currently practicing engineers...that's awesome. 

twk
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Silver
Another engineer
twk   12/20/2013 3:16:40 PM
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You missed Warren Livingston.  He went to work for Motorola in Scottsdale Arizona as an Electrical Engineer in 1966 as he retired from the Cowboys.  I hired him. he is a true gentleman.
Warren Livingston
No. 41
Cornerback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1938-07-05) July 5, 1938 (age 75)
Place of birth: Eufaula, Oklahoma
Career information
College: University of Arizona
Debuted in 1961
Last played in 1966
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played - started 67 - 15
Interceptions 10
Fumble recoveries 6
Stats at NFL.com


twk
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Silver
Another engineer
twk   12/20/2013 3:16:48 PM
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You missed Warren Livingston.  He went to work for Motorola in Scottsdale Arizona as an Electrical Engineer in 1966 as he retired from the Cowboys.  I hired him. he is a true gentleman.
Warren Livingston
No. 41
Cornerback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1938-07-05) July 5, 1938 (age 75)
Place of birth: Eufaula, Oklahoma
Career information
College: University of Arizona
Debuted in 1961
Last played in 1966
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played - started 67 - 15
Interceptions 10
Fumble recoveries 6
Stats at NFL.com


Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Another engineer
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:02:56 PM
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Thanks for the heads-up on Warren Livingston, twk. I was not aware of his engineering background, although I remember him in the NFL.

bobjengr
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Platinum
ENGINEERING AND THE NFL
bobjengr   12/21/2013 2:20:01 PM
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I certainly agree with you on this one Nancy.  I mentor three high school students and you would not believe the things they are told by their parents, peers and friends relative to why they can't be engineers.  I spend most of my time encouraging them and not helping with homework.    In each case, their ability is completely adequate for the task at hand.  I certainly applaud this write-up and slideshow.  It shows what can be accomplished with effort.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: ENGINEERING AND THE NFL
Nancy Golden   12/25/2013 1:47:50 AM
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bobjengr - I love that you are mentoring students. I am an adjunct professor at a local college and I can't tell you how many kids in my classes come from homes where they did not receive affirmation or encouragement regarding their education. Spending some time with these students - affirming their potential and encouraging them in their academic endeavors makes a huge difference for them. Your statement, "It shows what can be accomplished with effort" is the other half of the equation. I find that if you mentor students with a sincere desire for them to be successful, their response is typically to rise to the challenge. Often, ability is not the determining factor - it is the "want to" which can be cultivated in the mentoring relationship. Several of these students are on the school sports teams and did not think they could succeed academically - but with encouragement while holding them accountable - providing resources but not doing the work for them - they have found that they can.

What a blessing you are to those high school students!


bobjengr
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Platinum
Re: ENGINEERING AND THE NFL
bobjengr   12/26/2013 11:51:40 AM
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Nancy- When I discuss work ethic with my students I always give them the "Silent Cal Treatment". I give them each a copy of his statement below.  I have one student who is absolutely brilliant but CANNOT take a test.  He freezes. Utter panic.  This statement helped him overcome (partially) his fear of failure and made him realize that Yogie was right--"It ain't over till it's over."

          Persistence—President Calvin Coolidge said it better than anyone I have ever heard. "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.   Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.  The slogan "Press on" has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.  Calvin really knew what he was talking about.

Hope you and yours have a great 2014.  Take care.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: ENGINEERING AND THE NFL
Nancy Golden   12/26/2013 1:26:28 PM
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bobjengr - what a great quote! Very cool you shared that since I do something very similar with my students. The quote I use comes from Paul in Scripture: Philippians 3:13-14

"Brothers and sisters, I do not consider myself yet to have taken hold of it. But one thing I do: Forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead,I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus."


I tell my students that their past does not dictate their future - notice Paul says "forgetting what is behind" and says instead "straining toward what is ahead." Paul also uses the slogan "Press on." It is indeed wisdom for the ages...


Thanks for sharing - I shall add the quote you shared to my toolkit.


Wishing you and yours a wonderful and blessed New Year as well!


Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: ENGINEERING AND THE NFL
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 5:56:18 PM
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I actually hand-wrote that Coolidge quote on a Post-It note in 1988, and have kept it in my desk drawer ever since, bobjengr. I love that quote.

Tool_maker
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Platinum
Charlie Johnson
Tool_maker   12/21/2013 5:08:37 PM
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Charles: Your thumbnail of Charles Johnson omits the fact that he was also concurrently in the US Army for a couple seasons. He would spend all week as a soldier and the take a plane ride to St. Louis for weekend football. As I recall, he seldom played because he missed so much practice time and Jim Hart became the QB. After Johnson's military obligation expired, the Cardinals had to choose who to retain as both Hart and Johnson wanted to start. They choose Hart, who became a probowler in his own right, but there were many Cardinal fans who longed to have Johnson as the man under center. He was an excellent player and a genuine good guy. At least that was how he came across in interviews at the time. Thanks for reminding me of some of my growing-up years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Murray
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Re: Charlie Johnson
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:00:16 PM
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Although I was aware of Charlie Johnson's military service, I was not aware that he concurrently played football and flew to his games on Weekends. Great information, Tool_Maker. Thanks.

Habib Tariq
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Iron
adding a new dimension
Habib Tariq   12/22/2013 1:58:05 AM
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Not just football, but sports in general have become very technical with major emphasis on engineering. Engineering not does only play role in the playing part, but also on illustration of the game as well, which helps in better understanding of it.

For example take technologies like hotspot and hawk eye have become an important part of sports like cricket and tennis.
Hawk eye is a complex computer system used to visually track the trajectory of the ball.

Habib Tariq
User Rank
Iron
Re: adding a new dimension
Habib Tariq   12/22/2013 1:58:33 AM
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Now not only do the players have to focus on their physical abilities, but also have to work on how to use these technologies to their best interest.

notarboca
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Gold
Dick Anderson
notarboca   12/30/2013 2:57:04 PM
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If I recall correctly Dick Anderson, safety for the undefeated '72 Dolphins, was a chemical engineer.

Charles Murray
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Re: Dick Anderson
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 5:57:17 PM
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Thanks, notarboca, I was not aware that Dick Anderson was a chemical engineer.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Karl Baldischwiler
Charles Murray   1/2/2014 6:13:43 PM
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An engineer we left out (learned of him too late): Karl Baldischwiler, formerly of the Baltimore Colts (in the '80s), is a civil engineer.



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