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wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Bad Management
wbswenberg   12/2/2013 11:59:41 AM
NO RATINGS
It was not the kids fault.  Its bad management. With so many engineers looking for advancement management seems to be the way.  Then management training negates the engineering training.  It just not right to let a kid take the blame.  He should have been working under an experienced engineer.  Or have the design reviewed by one.  The installation techs should have been screaming code violations.  Now the code is not the end all.  There are cases where it is inadequate.  

We just got a new young lady engineer.  I worked with her as our designs need to be coordinated.  Since I'm the interconnect — connector focal, people come to me.  I had my connector sex ed class.  One has to be very careful in todays environment.  But there is a lot to learn.  Since I was very busy she asked another senior engineer to do a detailed review.  We were committed to not let her or her project fail.  

I also do over current and voltage protection.  I dont think there was a singe class that even mentioned connectivity or over current protection. I do remember some over voltage protection.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Bad Management
wbswenberg   12/2/2013 11:59:41 AM
NO RATINGS
It was not the kids fault.  Its bad management. With so many engineers looking for advancement management seems to be the way.  Then management training negates the engineering training.  It just not right to let a kid take the blame.  He should have been working under an experienced engineer.  Or have the design reviewed by one.  The installation techs should have been screaming code violations.  Now the code is not the end all.  There are cases where it is inadequate.  

We just got a new young lady engineer.  I worked with her as our designs need to be coordinated.  Since I'm the interconnect — connector focal, people come to me.  I had my connector sex ed class.  One has to be very careful in todays environment.  But there is a lot to learn.  Since I was very busy she asked another senior engineer to do a detailed review.  We were committed to not let her or her project fail.  

I also do over current and voltage protection.  I dont think there was a singe class that even mentioned connectivity or over current protection. I do remember some over voltage protection.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
No Protection?
tekochip   12/2/2013 10:33:10 AM
NO RATINGS
How is it possible that something drawing so much power had no circuit protection?
 
The only time I ever saw something like that was while my band was playing at a small club.  There was a big name act coming in that we were to warm-up for, and the roadies for the big band were dissatisfied with the power that he night club had available for lighting.  With that the roadies attached metal welding clamps to the incoming power, ahead of the breaker boxes, with large diameter cables affixed to the clamps.  The cables were insulated, but the clamps were just bare metal exposed to anyone foolish enough to stumble by the cables, and no breakers to stop anything like a clamp coming lose.


taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
taimoortariq   11/30/2013 10:07:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Shehan, and thats why many large scale companies have fully developed quality control and safety departments.

taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
taimoortariq   11/30/2013 10:05:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Definitely, techniques of design review and saftey design should be given attention in academia as well, but that can never be relied upon. A company has to have proper quality checks on every final design that its engineers make and also it should be reviewed by different specialist to make the design more robust as well.

taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
taimoortariq   11/30/2013 10:00:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Jmiller I agree with you, people should have not blamed the so called young engineer. If you are undertaking a project this big there should be proper measures and verification levels to it. Certainly, back then the quality control departments were not given a proper amount of attention.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
shehan   11/30/2013 9:36:27 PM
NO RATINGS
@jmiller – yes design review before you really create the product will add value to it. Being open to input from experts is a must.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
shehan   11/30/2013 9:33:27 PM
NO RATINGS
@jmiller – it's always good to assume that there might be a chance that something might go wrong, so it's good to be prepared to face that situation. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
shehan   11/30/2013 9:30:55 PM
NO RATINGS
@a.saji – yes in many cases the employee takes the blame. It's always good if the company could monitor and ensure that everything goes smooth. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Blame the guy at the bottom of the food chain.
shehan   11/30/2013 9:29:14 PM
NO RATINGS
@Jmiller – How come they didn't have procedures to ensure they don't repeat the same mistake. 

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