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Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Long development
Nancy Golden   11/26/2013 2:27:20 PM
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I find this very interesting:

"The Stanford effort appears to be one of the first to find a new way to improve lithium-ion batteries not by altering the chemistry itself but by adding this self-healing property."

It makes me wonder what studies have been done to conclude that the number of effective charging cycles are reduced because of broken connections versus the battery chemistry itself losing its potential through extended use. While I applaud the concept and can see how it would be helpful when these conditions occur, I don't know enough to understand if this is really a valid solution for general battery use or just a specific failure mode among others. Regardless, the technology is amazing and I admire the work of these researchers - we may very well find some spin-off applications from this research.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Long development
far911   11/26/2013 1:27:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Shehan it is really questionable WHY? the battery manufacturer havent come up for it. I agree.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Convenience
far911   11/26/2013 1:25:05 PM
NO RATINGS
I say it will be great to have batteries lasting long while in use, and every one seems 2 be kken 2 see it soon , same goes for me as it will be great not to keep many batteries in resrve for the games, remote , kids toys etc.so looking forward for a rapid development.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Long development
NadineJ   11/26/2013 1:12:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I think this may be an example of under promise and over deliver.  I suspect we'll see this closer to 5 years from now, not 10!

Our tech development revolution is on an accelerated cycle.  The luxury to develop slowly is almost gone.  If it takes 10 years, it may be irrelevant by then.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Long development
shehan   11/26/2013 12:52:21 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elizabeth – How could it be so simple? Why wasn't this introduced by battery manufactures sometime back is a question most of us have. I guess as you said time will tell. 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long development
Elizabeth M   11/26/2013 12:45:12 PM
NO RATINGS
That's true, shehan, and what I think is most interesting about this is that while other scientists are working on new chemistries to make batteries last longer, this actually affects the structure of the battery and not the chemistry. It seems also like too easy of a fix for a problem that has been until now seemingly complicated to solve. I guess time will tell.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Long development
shehan   11/26/2013 12:39:25 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elizabeth – Exactly, it's not easy to withdraw a product once you create an impression on the customers mind. As they say "Never over promise and under deliver"

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Long development
Elizabeth M   11/26/2013 12:32:44 PM
NO RATINGS
That's true, shehan, but better they perfect it and make sure it's working optimally before releasing a half-baked technology.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Long development
shehan   11/26/2013 12:30:14 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elizabeth – yes I think it needs more research and development which might take few years. Waiting for the technology knowing its coming is the worst problem. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Long development
shehan   11/26/2013 12:27:10 PM
NO RATINGS
@RoB – yes most of us are eagerly waiting to see this wonderful invention. What more could you expect from technology? 

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