HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/6  >  >>
William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: engineers in movies
William K.   2/22/2014 4:14:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Actually, I have been wondering how close a screenplay is to the very detailed functional specification of a human interface controls program. That is, the specification that describes each screen, what the choices are, and what the program does, for each step of operation. That may be a liitle like the description of what each scene should look like, and what happens as each line is said. Or possibly not.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Brainstorm
Charles Murray   2/21/2014 3:47:08 PM
NO RATINGS
You're right, BrainiacV, testing isn't a suject that gets shown in the movies. No Highway in the Sky with James Stewart includes testing as kind of a sub-text, but even in that movie, you don't see much actual test.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: engineers in movies
Charles Murray   2/21/2014 3:44:47 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm with you on that, William K. I've never written a movie script, but I'd bet money that I wouldn't be good at it.

BrainiacV
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Brainstorm
BrainiacV   2/18/2014 4:33:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Design iterations were what I loved about the first Iron Man movie.  That, and that things didn't always work first time :-)

They even bothered to have a scene where they were testing the leg mechanism in the cave.

How many movies bother to show testing and failures? They usually make it seem like everything works first time, every time.

rkinner
User Rank
Iron
Re: engineers in movies
rkinner   2/18/2014 9:25:15 AM
NO RATINGS
 I can't forget Dr. Holly Goodhead who was in Moonraker as a CIA agent, astronaut and scientist.  Maybe not a full engineer but an example of the whole line of Bond films (and some Bond girls) who were very accomplished technically prior to their meeting James.

Its a bad line but do remenber "Q" at the end of the film as they establish video of the two of them in a weightless environment saying "I believe he's attempting re-entry".  Engineers do have libdos, too.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: engineers in movies
William K.   1/23/2014 9:52:05 PM
NO RATINGS
THAT is an interesting concept, Charles. But I suspect that writing screenplays and scripts is a lot harder than writing screens and functions for control programs. For starters, nobody would ever want to spend an hour starting a process or a machine. But the two do have some simularities.

But I think that I will keep my writing on the technical side. I can do that fairly well, I don't know how I would do with scripts and screen plays.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: engineers in movies
Charles Murray   1/23/2014 8:06:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, engineers have been inaccurately depicted in movies on a regular basis, William K. Surprisingly, the movie industry is aware of this problem. A few years ago, the American Film Institute hosted classes in script writing for scientists and engineers. I don't know if any of the scripts from those classes ever made it to the sliver screen, though.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: engineers in movies
William K.   1/23/2014 2:32:27 PM
NO RATINGS
I read the book, but never saw the movie. I guess that the one character was an engineer but that seemed just incidental to the plot.

The problem with accurately depicting engineers in movies is that either they would be boring or come across as know-it-alls, neither of which would be accurate. And in other instances they are depicted as being horribly unfeeling in the name of efficiency. At least that has been my recollection.

esb
User Rank
Iron
engineers in movies
esb   1/23/2014 10:50:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Did you forget Atlas Shrugged?

esb
User Rank
Iron
engineers in movies
esb   1/23/2014 10:49:49 AM
NO RATINGS
Did you forget Atlas Shrugged?

<<  <  Page 2/6  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service