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Charles Murray
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Re: Brainstorm
Charles Murray   2/21/2014 3:47:08 PM
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You're right, BrainiacV, testing isn't a suject that gets shown in the movies. No Highway in the Sky with James Stewart includes testing as kind of a sub-text, but even in that movie, you don't see much actual test.

Charles Murray
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Re: engineers in movies
Charles Murray   2/21/2014 3:44:47 PM
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I'm with you on that, William K. I've never written a movie script, but I'd bet money that I wouldn't be good at it.

BrainiacV
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Re: Brainstorm
BrainiacV   2/18/2014 4:33:43 PM
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Design iterations were what I loved about the first Iron Man movie.  That, and that things didn't always work first time :-)

They even bothered to have a scene where they were testing the leg mechanism in the cave.

How many movies bother to show testing and failures? They usually make it seem like everything works first time, every time.

rkinner
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Iron
Re: engineers in movies
rkinner   2/18/2014 9:25:15 AM
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 I can't forget Dr. Holly Goodhead who was in Moonraker as a CIA agent, astronaut and scientist.  Maybe not a full engineer but an example of the whole line of Bond films (and some Bond girls) who were very accomplished technically prior to their meeting James.

Its a bad line but do remenber "Q" at the end of the film as they establish video of the two of them in a weightless environment saying "I believe he's attempting re-entry".  Engineers do have libdos, too.

William K.
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Re: engineers in movies
William K.   1/23/2014 9:52:05 PM
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THAT is an interesting concept, Charles. But I suspect that writing screenplays and scripts is a lot harder than writing screens and functions for control programs. For starters, nobody would ever want to spend an hour starting a process or a machine. But the two do have some simularities.

But I think that I will keep my writing on the technical side. I can do that fairly well, I don't know how I would do with scripts and screen plays.

Charles Murray
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Re: engineers in movies
Charles Murray   1/23/2014 8:06:46 PM
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Yes, engineers have been inaccurately depicted in movies on a regular basis, William K. Surprisingly, the movie industry is aware of this problem. A few years ago, the American Film Institute hosted classes in script writing for scientists and engineers. I don't know if any of the scripts from those classes ever made it to the sliver screen, though.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: engineers in movies
William K.   1/23/2014 2:32:27 PM
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I read the book, but never saw the movie. I guess that the one character was an engineer but that seemed just incidental to the plot.

The problem with accurately depicting engineers in movies is that either they would be boring or come across as know-it-alls, neither of which would be accurate. And in other instances they are depicted as being horribly unfeeling in the name of efficiency. At least that has been my recollection.

esb
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Iron
engineers in movies
esb   1/23/2014 10:50:00 AM
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Did you forget Atlas Shrugged?

esb
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Iron
engineers in movies
esb   1/23/2014 10:49:49 AM
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Did you forget Atlas Shrugged?

Elizabeth M
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Re: The engineer as star
Elizabeth M   12/4/2013 7:25:41 AM
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Yes, Chuck, I don't think you're the only person who feels that way, as I think I mentioned before! But maybe we are underestimating poor Elvis. :)

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