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Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
Mydesign   11/14/2013 6:52:53 AM
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"you make a very good point. If enough power could be generated to power the entire toy and not just some kind of light or gizmo on the top, then this technology would be even more useful."

Elizabeth, I had seen similar thing in Chinese toys. Toys are working with a mechanical key and we have to key it before it starts. When it performs, the mechanical movements are converting into electrical energy for performing other functionalities like sound, light, obstruct detection etc.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: piezoelectric devices
Mydesign   11/14/2013 6:48:35 AM
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"It does seem like it is the touch and the movement that combine to generate energy in Disney's method."

Elizabeth, that's great. Then that's a piezoelectric technology, where any form of stress and pressure can be convert into equivalent form of electricity.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: piezoelectric devices
Elizabeth M   11/14/2013 3:45:24 AM
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Conductive paints sound like a really interesting idea, too, Jack B. And a company called Pavegen already has invented energy-harvesting tiles that use people's footfalls, which is really quite cool: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=262295

Thanks for the comment and your compliment.

Jack B
User Rank
Iron
Re: piezoelectric devices
Jack B   11/13/2013 3:09:01 PM
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It will be interesting to see where this could lead to in the future. With conductive paints, and paper circuits the printed page may never be the same. Scaling it up you could harvest the energy of people walking over a surface or traffic rolling over a highway. Great write-up!

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
GTOlover   11/13/2013 9:49:33 AM
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Battar,

Great idea. As for the TV watching, I rarely watch, but the TV is 200+ channels of uselessness. When I do sit down to watch, the remote is in constant use channel surfing. I usually end up turning off the TV and working on one of my hobbies.

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
Battar   11/13/2013 9:29:00 AM
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Mydesign,

              you say " Some mechanism for converting the toy activity to a self powering mode will be very good"

That sounds like a recipe for a perpetual motion machine. I'm waiting to see the prototype. On the other hand, if you have an idea how I can harvest my 3 boys' excess energy for useful purpose (there is plenty, efficiency is not an issue), then you have my full and undivided attention.

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
Battar   11/13/2013 9:22:52 AM
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GTOlover,

               Has it ever occurred to you to place a selenium PV cell on the remote and harvest the light energy emitted by your TV to power the device?

If you find youself periodically replacing the batteries on the remote, it's a sure sign that you watch too much TV.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
Elizabeth M   11/13/2013 3:46:22 AM
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Now that is a fine idea, GTOLover. How annoying is it to continuously push the button of the remote to try to change a channel with no success and then realize you're out of batteries and have to go searching around for some. I'm sure that can be done.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Charge?
Elizabeth M   11/13/2013 3:43:15 AM
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Sounds like a good idea, Cadman-LT, but how would that work exactly? :)

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Will be interesting to see how it's used commercially
GTOlover   11/12/2013 12:45:44 PM
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How about energy harvesting the button push of the TV remote! Never have to replace the remote control batteries.

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