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bob from maine
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Re: Here's 2 more categories
bob from maine   11/7/2013 2:28:39 PM
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Aye, but the list of those 'scientifically proven impossible' things that ultimately because possible seems to grow daily. We must not accept as 'fact' those things that seem extremely unlikely today. If we can't dream it, we surely will never do it. Excellent article!

GTOlover
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Re: Under-promise and over-deliver
GTOlover   11/7/2013 1:27:30 PM
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"Cap'n, you cannot defy the laws of physics." And yet they seemed to have 'warp' travel, gravimetric plating, photon torpedoes, and replicators (though I think we saw some 3D printed food some where in Design News).

And as mentioned before, transparent aluminum seemingly developed with a few keystrokes into a Mac computer. Then we have the crew assembling large panels of this stuff in the cargo hold of a Kligon Bird of Prey. The scale-up was of record proportions!!!

GTOlover
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Platinum
Re: English
GTOlover   11/7/2013 1:21:31 PM
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And yet Brainiac, Uhura was a linguistics expert. Why?

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Here's 2 more categories
GTOlover   11/7/2013 1:18:52 PM
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And yet Jim, no seat belts! I understand that the inertial dampeners were supposed to keep the crew from feeling the jolts, but why in the heck did these seem to always fail.

Spock, sit down and put the seat belt on! Wait, no one on the bridge had one. Even Kirk could not keep his hindend in his chair.

At least the JJ reboot had the insight to add these cool seat belts that automatically rolled over them and secured the person to the chair.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: future holds the promise of better materials
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/7/2013 11:42:10 AM
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We all had a good laugh when Scotty 'spoke' into the mouse ---  but then also laughed when he simply typed the algorithm for transparent aluminum into the keyboard of a Macintosh and yielded a dynamically rotating molecular 3D image after about 15 seconds of input.  Loved it! 

"Episode IV, The Voyage Home" still ranks as one of favorite all-time movies.  "Well, Double-dumb-ass on you !! "

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Here's 2 more categories
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/7/2013 11:31:38 AM
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Battar – agreed – you'll notice I did not specifically mention the 'Transporter' – ( altho' I DO concede that I did say "all" the technologies).  So, your correction is accepted. 

My point, however, covers literally dozens of lesser-noticed things, like the Bluetooth headset sticking out of Lt. Uhuru's ear on every episode. Or, the automatic presence-sensing sliding doors.  Or, the hand-held scanner units.  Oh, and here's a good one; Scotty taking a small rectangular handheld prism, and inserting it into the main computer console, from which spews gigabytes of reference data --  the pre-cursor to today's USB thumb-drive.  All of these things were mere fantasy visions in 1966, and are commonplace in 2013.

JimiEngr
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Iron
Inspired
JimiEngr   11/7/2013 9:51:52 AM
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I remember watching reruns of Star Trek in the Engineering Lounge while in college and hearing the naysayers ridicule the technology depicted as they walked by. They were descendants of the Flat Earth Society; If God Meant us to Fly, He'd have given us wings religion; and the Can't Travel Faster than the Speed of Sound club. I know Star Trek inspired me and many, many other engineers. As for the engineer naysayers they moved on to management positions with the bean counters where they can do the most harm.

When I got my flip-phone, I thought the person that designed it was definitely a Trekie.

BrainiacV
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Platinum
Re: English
BrainiacV   11/7/2013 9:46:07 AM
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The dodge they used was that they had universal translators, operating under the assumption that there are universal concepts.  A technical version of the Babel fish.

dfortune
User Rank
Iron
Under-promise and over-deliver
dfortune   11/7/2013 9:08:27 AM
I recall that it wasn't that Scotty said something was impossible and then did it, rather than he told Kirk it would take much longer than what Kirk then told him he had time do to it - and then did it.

This was exemplified in the movie "Generations" where Scotty told Jordy (maybe not the exact verbiage) "My God man, you didn't tell him what time it would really take, did you?"

RogueMoon
User Rank
Gold
future holds the promise of better materials
RogueMoon   11/7/2013 9:06:04 AM
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Dave,

A running gag in one of my old assignments was to deplore the lack of "transparent aluminum" whenever we had a materials problem.  This fantastic 23rd century material was referenced in the movie, Star Trek IV and at least brought a grin to the face of our metallurgists whenever it was brought up (even by our chief engineer, one time :O).  

Sadly, in our timeline, the guy at the plant in the Bay Area must have been out of the office when Scotty and Bones popped by?  We've been waiting for this product to show up since the late 20th century when it was (sort of) invented.  Scotty even got an old Mac to do the work for him (once he quit talking into the mouse).  

We can't always expect a time-travelling starship chief engineer to show up with a game-changing new material, but I think we can all agree the future holds the promise of better materials.  As engineers and designers, we're wise to keep our eyes open to new materials.  I learned this from Star Trek.

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