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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Chrysler Atlantic 2
William K.   10/29/2013 8:42:23 PM
NO RATINGS
That FourJoy looked every bit as impractical as any of the concept cars shown. And it was not nearly sporty enough to be a fun sports type of vehicle. WHAt were they thinking?

The Dodge pickup would have sold a lot if they had put regular type doors on it, it looked much cooler than the El Camino. But Chrysler management of that era was often immume to creativity, except for my 1965 Barracuda. I loved that car. With a few modifications to the suspension it handled like a real race car.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Chrysler Atlantic 2
Ann R. Thryft   10/29/2013 2:54:13 PM
NO RATINGS
I like the looks of the Chrysler Atlantic. It was also fun to see the Mustang prototype. OTOH, Daimler's Smart Fourjoy looks really impractical to me.



tluxon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Unoriginal
tluxon   10/29/2013 2:34:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Right - someone clearly thought "unnecessary ballast" was a clever turn of phrase, but that pesky "ballast" on any car is almost never considered unnecessary by the designers.  The real indicator as to whether it's necessary or not would ultimately be determined by the marketplace.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Human Imagination
ervin0072002   10/29/2013 2:23:47 PM
NO RATINGS
I think this is useful art. Only if every artist was also an engineer dont you think the world would be a better place?

Jim S
User Rank
Gold
Re: Technology from concept cars
Jim S   10/29/2013 1:13:46 PM
NO RATINGS
I was only saying the technology could possibly be adapted for another purpose. Out of all of them I liked the Buick Y the most.

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Technology from concept cars
Tool_maker   10/29/2013 12:52:01 PM
NO RATINGS
@Jim S: To me the BMW looks like a death trap. I think it would lose in a collision with a Smart Car and that is saying something. On the cars I like the old Buick best, but what I really found facinating was the Big Hair on the two models with the 70 Mustang. It brought back uncomfortable memories of choking on my wife's hairspray before we left the house. I wonder how much lung damage is a remnant of that era.

  Great show Charles. I agree with an earlier poster about all of the glass. That reminds me of an AMC Pacer. Yuchh.

Jim S
User Rank
Gold
Technology from concept cars
Jim S   10/29/2013 10:21:33 AM
NO RATINGS
The BMW concept seems to have technology that could be adapted to aircraft design. The shape changing capability could re-form a wing from a low drag high speed airfoil to a high drag low speed airfoil. The transition could be such that all intermediate combinations would allow an aircraft to operate in all flight regimes. This would allow the same aircraft to go from STOL to high speed flight, extending it's utility.

rmz
User Rank
Iron
Chrysler Atlantic
rmz   10/29/2013 10:05:51 AM
NO RATINGS
This was clearly a Chrysler update ( ripoff) of the Bugatti "Atlantique"  design of the 1930's.  

rmz
User Rank
Iron
Chrysler Atlantic
rmz   10/29/2013 10:05:46 AM
NO RATINGS
This was clearly a Chrysler update ( ripoff) of the Bugatti "Atlantique"  design of the 1930's.  

j-allen
User Rank
Gold
Concept cars mostly silly
j-allen   10/29/2013 9:33:14 AM
Photo 1, the Peugeot, makes a mistake that has characterized concept cars for decades--too much glass.  Leave that one out in the summer sun and you can bake baguettes inside.  

 

Very few of the designs seek to solve the real problems facing automobiles these days except for the VW electric.  It offers modest range in what might be affordable and well suited to daily commuting and local trips.  That is far more practical than being able to race at 250 mph, however much the latter may seem to compensate for certain masculine shortcomings. 

 

The BMW with fabric skin is interesting.  Clearly there is a century-long history in aviation.  Is the shape-shifting feature just cutesy-poo, or does it somehow optimize aerodynamics over varying speed regimes?  If so, I would like to know how many teaspoons of gasoline this would save over the life of the vehicle?  Also, how durable is the fabric versus sunlight, weather, shrubbery, etc?  Again, based on aircraft, fabric skin has a limited life, even without "shape shifting."

 

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