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John
User Rank
Gold
Re: Recall?
John   6/18/2014 3:13:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Reply to "Real life is also that cars depreciate so your perfect hardly driven 30,000 mile 2000MY MR2 would be at best worth $6,000 and not $10,000, and while it may cost that much to "fix" even after you put the $10,000 in it, due to the fact that the engine was rebuilt, it woudl be actually worth about $500 less, if you tell anyone about it during trade-in."



 

It could be worth $10,000 if has enough demand for it.  A perfect hardly driven 30,000 mile car shouldn't need an engine rebuild.  It used to be very common to have an engine rebuilt.  There are different levels of engine rebuild, but I don't think it should be viewed as "bad".

GreyMatters
User Rank
Iron
Re: Recall?
GreyMatters   4/17/2014 11:53:36 AM
NO RATINGS
Ummm, try 6.39 million globally since 09 April 2014. Also, unless you have been living under a rock, Toyota finally recalled ten million vehicles for unintended acceleration. Indeed, Toyota is truly the recall king, and, you have thusly been enlightened.

Keldawwg
User Rank
Gold
Re: Recall?
Keldawwg   2/25/2014 4:53:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Recall King Toyota?

Dude, Toyota had what, 50 recalls in the last 20 years?

What did GM have? I counted over 185 recalls... What did Ford have? Over 60...

How does this record make Toyota the Recall King? In my book, Government Motors handily wins the title of Recall King...

Please... Enlighten me...

Keldawwg
User Rank
Gold
Toyota... Not perfect, but still one of the best...
Keldawwg   2/25/2014 4:15:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Well, I had to laugh a little at all the posts describing how horrible Toyota is...

I have two Toyotas, and I have yet to have a problem with either one. One is a 2004 Tundra Double Cab Limited (110,000 miles, not a single problem yet) and a 1995 T-100 (350,000 miles, not a single problem that could in any way be ascribed to Toyota...)

I have read quite a few technical articles on the Toyota Unintended acceleration issue... The ones that were not outright fraud (an unfortunate constant in our society these days) were likely rooted in "Tin Whiskers" which is a huge problem in every product made now, with the exception of Military and Aviation/Aerospace, which is of course exempt...

As far as a recall, or lack of recall goes, I think Mercedes wins the Douchebag award... Every vehicle they made from 1992 through 1996 had wiring that would just disintegrate... Imagine buying an $80,000 Mercedes and three years later it either won't run, or it burned to the ground due to the insulation completely disintegrating in the engine compartment... Would you be angry? 

Not only did Mercedes never acknowledge this as a problem, they didn't even give the owners of those cars a break on the parts to fix this issue... I was quoted $1500 to have the engine wiring harness replaced on my 1993 400E, and I eventually got the harness for the bargain price of $500 on the internet and replaced it myself.

Cars these days are becoming incredibly complex, and the computer systems running them are bordering on ridiculous. My wife's "new" Mercedes, a 2011 C300, has 37 different modules controlling the cars systems... 37 modules... It takes literally 15 minutes to scan the entire car using an Autoenginuity scanner plugged into my computer...

My Tundra did have a recall, apparently two or three of them had problems with the ball joints... The dealer replaced them for free, and even detailed the truck for no charge...

I wonder just exactly what car you would buy if you think Toyota makes a lot of junk... Government Motors? Kia? Hyundai? If Toyota doesn't get a passing grade, what vehicle does? (Ford was making some really good cars a couple of years ago, but have you seen the problems thay've been having lately?)

I'm really curious...

Parris Boyd
User Rank
Gold
Re: Recall?
Parris Boyd   11/8/2013 6:02:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Real hoot, "MIROX." You say MR2 Spyder owners don't have a case, then you advise filing complaints with EPA or CARB. Believe it or not, "MIROX," there is such a thing as right and wrong, and our sorry excuse for a government - Repukes and Demagogues alike - panders to the latter. Get serious about the "real world." It's a place where corrupt corporations aren't held accountable unless citizens take 'em into court (not viable in most cases) or expose their corporate crookedness via blogs, picketing, word of mouth, comments on articles, etc. Such activities DO have an impact, which is why businesses - especially coverup operations like Toyota - hire so-called "reputation management" firms to steer conversations, etc., especially on the Internet, "MIROX." In fact, a recent case came to light involving Edmunds.com and a gang of corporate hirees posting fake reviews:

http://www.autodealermonthly.com/news/story/2013/08/edmunds-com-settles-with-firm-for-fake-reviews.aspx

Don't ever think people are helpless when confronted by oppression. And this point is probably wasted on you, but standing up to a corporate/government bully also helps ya sleep better.

MIROX
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Recall?
MIROX   11/8/2013 3:54:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Just file proper complaint with EPA and if you are in California CARB.

Two million bolgs will do nothing !

Also you seem to forget that there is not a single OEM in the auto industry in the world that has a business model that keeps OLD vehicles on the road, indefinitely.

Evan safety defects after 10 years, are 100% voluntary recall actions as even NHTSA can not after 10 years "force" OEM to conduct recall, and that is something that can injure or kill someone.

SO emission problem on 13 year old car is non issue to everyone concerned.

Most "extended" warranties if issued are for 8 years from date of manufacture is they have no mileage limit, usually on cars and trucks where the original warranty was 3 to 5 years and less than 50,000 miles.

I can understand your frustration - belive me- just trying to emilghten you on what the real life in the fast lane is like.

OEM can make the worst possible cars for about 3 to 5 years before it impacts them negatively.

TOYOTA made superb products in 1980's and they still live on that reputation 30 years later with best "loyalty" in the car busines, i.e. pervious Toyota owners will stil; buy another Toyota, before anything else.

I personally would not get one, and probably you will not either, but about 9 million people in the World will get one this year.

Parris Boyd
User Rank
Gold
Re: Recall?
Parris Boyd   11/8/2013 3:28:01 PM
NO RATINGS
"MIROX," having "been in auto business" since 1982, have you ever heard of an extended warranty? Disintegrating engines in MR2 Spyders is a simple case - there are plenty of others - of Toyota stonewalling customers about an obvious defect. All the anonymous blabber in the world isn't going to change the fact that Recall King Toyota - supported by our illustrious government - simply refuses to do the right thing.

Insofar as the value of MR2 Spyders is concerned, nothing you stated is correct. And try to discern the difference between an engine disintegrating at under 30,000 miles versus the total miles a car may have been driven, including mileage after the engine was rebuilt.

"When car is 13 years old, it is not expected to run, even if you'd never used it." Batteries, perhaps? I won't belabor the obvious absurdity of such a statement.

Facts are gradually coming to light about Toyota's lousy products - ANOTHER recall was announced today - and the company's horrendous attitude toward customers. I hope expert testimony regarding Toyota's Electronic Throttle Control System, prompting a guilty verdict in the Oklahoma Sudden Unintended Acceleration Case, will be made available to the public.

Meanwhile, "MIROX," rest assured that I'll be bloggin' right along :-) 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Recall?
William K.   11/7/2013 7:42:37 PM
NO RATINGS
I had a 1985 Dodge van and after 23 years I got rid of it because of frame rust. BUT if it had not been exposed to the super-corrosive Detroit area road salt it would have been good for a lot more years. The major problems were the radio buttons and an aftermarket replacement Electronic ignition module clearly made by dumb moneys. That and fuel line rustouts after about 18 years. Actually, every problem on that vehicle was caused by rust, except for the radio buttom\ns issue.

MIROX
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Recall?
MIROX   11/7/2013 1:40:40 AM
NO RATINGS
Denial ?

Toyota did that with thousands of engines that died of sludge build up in Motor Oil, and they still do that, even since Toyota announced 3 different times over last 5 years that the problem no longer exists, the cure is not to buy Toyota, but it really does not seem to matter as 62% of Toyota owners just buy another one, so Toyota has some of the highest in the auto industry "loyalty" rating.

When you are #1 or #2 OEM in the World by volume, you need not to care about every individual owner.

 

MIROX
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Recall?
MIROX   11/7/2013 1:32:39 AM
NO RATINGS
@Parris Boyd

It is 2013, the car you say is 2000 MY, the design and certification life was 5 years or 50,000 miles - and up to 8 years on "high priced emission components" your emission warranty lists them - usually it is only the ECU and sometimes the MAIN catalyst.

Demanding anything from any manufacturer be it car or cell phone when it is way past the time limit on a warranty is not "fair", no matter what you think.

If the "damage" was even few days after the warranty expired there is no obligation to do anything by anyone, that is why warranties are disclosed and available by US Federal Law BEFORE you buy anything, so you need to read them, understand them and not expect anything more than what is written in them.

Makes no difference what the product is, that is why we have laws in USA and they affect everyone equally.

When car is 13 years old, it is not expected to run, even if you'd never used it.

Just a reality in automotive business, no OEM has a business model to keep existing cars on the road indefinitely and any customer that does not buy a new vehicle every 3 to 5 years is not wanted by any OEM, just a real life - so get used to it.

I have been in auto business since 1982 and that is just how things are, for a brief period of few years in mid 1980's cars were made more durable than needed to be, due to the terrible experience with short longevity in late 1970's due to new emission regulations, then everyone wised up and started to lower cost and reduce durability to acceptable level.

If you want 2 seat thrill get BERTONE X1/9 from 1980's you can fix that car "forever" and no pre cat there, parts are available and there is plenty of good ones out there. 

Real life is also that cars depreciate so your perfect hardly driven 30,000 mile 2000MY MR2 would be at best worth $6,000 and not $10,000, and while it may cost that much to "fix" even after you put the $10,000 in it, due to the fact that the engine was rebuilt, it woudl be actually worth about $500 less, if you tell anyone about it during trade-in.

 

 

 


 


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