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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Any Warning?
William K.   10/28/2013 8:13:08 PM
One other thing is that I don't recall in any of my cars having any hoses in any lubrication oil lines. The closest was in a transmission cooler line. 

My opinion is that having a hose in any critical lubrication line is very poor engineering, at best, and terribly negligent as well. We KNOW that the hose will fail eventually so why would they use it? All reputable automakers use steel tubing if they need to run lubrication oil outside of the engine block. The aftermarket oil coolers are a different story and even there, if they are of a decent quality that line is very durable, with steel braid under the jacket, not cloth braid.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Any Warning?
William K.   10/28/2013 1:00:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Critic: why they don't make cars that never fail is easy to answer, which is that they wouod cost a whole lot more. Just conside military equipmet for tactical,(battle) operations. When many lives depend on perfect functioning the cost equation changes a bit. ON my car, the failure of almost any component results in it not driving quite right or in some convenience featuyre not working, none of which are life threatening.

So if you really want a forever vehicle go purchase a military spec Jeep. Not one of the "wanabe's, but the real thing. Aside from belts and tires it will last until long after you are quite tired of it. But it will cost a lot to purchase.

OR, you could become a higher level manager type at an auto company and drive a vehicle that gets preventive maintenance every workday. Then you will never experience any of the problems that the rest of us have.

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Any Warning?
Critic   10/28/2013 11:26:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I am curious to know whether there were any warning signs that the oil hose was going to fail.  Was it leaking, cracked, or bulging? 

I realize that many people don't crawl under their cars, and another category of people don't understand preventive maintenance.  Often (not always) hose failures can be predicted just by looking at them.  Also, it is a good practice to replace hoses periodically, even if they don't appear to be bad!

I am guessing that this low-oil-pressure incident could have been avoided if the car had excellent periodic inspection/maintenance.  This is just another viewpoint- I realize it is not a popular one- the car owner doesn't want to blame himself for lousy maintenance, so he blames the manufacturer for poor design.

Why don't manufacturers make cars that never require maintenance and never fail?  Would any of you bloggers like to answer this?

 

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Re: warning lights
Critic   10/28/2013 10:59:15 AM
NO RATINGS
"Probably the oil light in a Lexus is intended to never illuminate, since that would indicate a flaw in the Jap engineering. And admitting to any problem would damage their egos."  Yep, I believe this is accurate.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/14/2013 3:00:39 PM
NO RATINGS
That explains a lot, GTOlover. I would guess part of the differentiation in a luxury vehicle would be superior engineering.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
GTOlover   10/14/2013 2:19:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, I am not sure of the Lexus brand, but the GM and Ford brand the engineers and quality people are seperated by the divisions. Ford and Licoln had different engineers. I am not sure who designed the base vehicle chassis, but the differences of the two brands are engineered by seperate teams. Cadillac engineers were very meticulous about the fit and function of their parts and the Cheverolet engineers were more concerned about quality at rate (meaning does the part assemble correctly on the assembly line).

Somehow, I think that Lexus probably has a similar engineering and quality structure, but the Japanese do things their way.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/14/2013 8:28:24 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm probably wrong that the engineering and quality control teams for luxury cars are the same as with the lower-cost lines. It's a guess, I'll try to find out whether there is a higher quality team for the more expensive cars.

Chartrain
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
Chartrain   10/12/2013 5:12:05 PM
High end = high marketing effort and hig $$$ not necessarily high quality.

Common componnets aren't even manufactured by the parent company and your luxury vehicle could be sharing the same part with a domestic econo box.

I was a big fan and charter member of the Lincoln LS club. It was an excellent car with an indendent rear suspension and handled like a BMW.

The rear window regulators were prone to failure and when we discussed with the Lincoln engineers they said it was the same part number used by Mercedes from a 3rd party supplier.

Chartrain
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
Chartrain   10/12/2013 3:52:02 PM
NO RATINGS
The noise I heard was lifters rattling. Accelerating made them clatter (oil starvation) while backing off the engine would quiet down. Mind you this was all in less than 30 seconds so I'm sure the damage if any,was minimal.

In the 70's back in the frozen tundra of Canada, I slid my 74 Torino off the road requiring a tow truck to extract me. Unbeknownst at the time, the oil pressure sensor has been smashed by some ice jammed into that part of the engine. I drove approximately 30 miles  at 65 mph with liitle to no oil and only discovered it when I pulled into a toll booth and rolled down my window and heard the crank clunking.

Being sub zero and some miles from the nearest town, my illogical reasoning said that of it ran this far, what was another 5 miles. I drove to a service station (remember those?) where the pressure switch was replaced, the engine topped up with oil and I drove the car for several more years before like it cousins of the 70's it fell apart from rust.

The oil light never came on in that instance either.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/11/2013 12:14:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the clarification, Rob. If there isn't a layer of higher quality control and engineering for the more expensive line, and most of the components are the same, it seems like one heck of a waste of money.

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