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Bunter
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Re: Thoughts from a cyclist.
Bunter   10/9/2013 8:53:24 AM
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Hi Elizabeth,

Actually you are not disagreeing with me.  Note my last statement is in support of pursuing the research.

Take care.

Dennis

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thoughts from a cyclist.
Elizabeth M   10/9/2013 8:49:10 AM
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Well that's true, Chuck (and Bunter). No matter what material is used for something, if the thing itself doesn't serve its ultimate purpose then it really doesn't matter. Although in this case, I would disagree a bit and say even if using this material doesn't achieve a workable bike helmet, the exploration of new materials is still valid (if not for the object itself, than for the science of creating the object).

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Thoughts from a cyclist.
Charles Murray   10/8/2013 7:01:22 PM
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Good point, Bunter. If it doesn't perform in terms of safety or function, none of the other features will matter.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thoughts from a cyclist.
Elizabeth M   10/8/2013 8:53:12 AM
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Thanks for your comment, Bunter. I can totally see your point, and I would say that definitely yes, this product will not work as it is now. But maybe with some tweaks in the future, it could be a viable option. And the fact that someone is working with bioresin to replace something that was traditionally made from plastic is a good step forward for the use of more sustainable materials.

Bunter
User Rank
Platinum
Thoughts from a cyclist.
Bunter   10/8/2013 8:44:24 AM
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I won't say "it will never work".  An engineer should "never" use that word.  ;^D

I have raced bikes on and off-road, commuted in city traffic in all weather (try winter in Fargo, ND, was I nuts?).  Frankly a non-vented, heavier helmet is a no go.  Might be able to do something for the skate park/freestyle crowd.

This is a loooooooooooooooooooong way from viable.

When we are talking safety equipment for myself or my family eco-friendliness will not even get a consideration.  The product has to perform. 

On the other hand if he wants to put the effort into development and can bring it to the point where it does not compromise safety or function we can talk.

TTFN

Dennis

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Material properties
Elizabeth M   10/8/2013 6:59:44 AM
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I'm curious as well, Chuck! I actually think one problem might be degradation over time. I am not speaking from expertise, but it just seems that bioresin may not be as durable. But that is something that wouldn't be known until these products were out there being used. Perhaps someone who is a materials expert could weigh in on this?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: New directions in bio-materials
Elizabeth M   10/8/2013 6:42:31 AM
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I agree with you, Ann, it is a natural fit. Perhaps a bike helmet was a bit ambitious, as there are safety concerns with it that will need a lot of testing and trial and error to ensure it can offer the protection people need. Other products that are less about safety and more about pure sports use (perhaps soccer balls or something like that) might be easier to tackle as initial commercial products.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Testing for safety
Elizabeth M   10/8/2013 6:40:35 AM
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Yes, for sure, Rob, I totally agree. I think Dart's helmet could really work, but the truth will be in the testing, which he couldn't manage on his own. The backing of a manufacturer will certainly help with this, as you point out, and proof whether this type of helmet is viable for commercial distribution.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Material properties
Charles Murray   10/7/2013 7:17:28 PM
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Nice story, Liz. I'd be curious to see how the material properties of the bio-resin compare to the properties of conventional helmet materials.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: New directions in bio-materials
Ann R. Thryft   10/7/2013 12:40:33 PM
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Thanks for this report, Elizabeth. Good to see bioplastics moving into sports equipment: it seems like a natural fit.

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