HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/4  >  >>
John_Reed
User Rank
Iron
Re: Management by monkeys
John_Reed   7/9/2015 11:50:31 AM
NO RATINGS
I worked for years at a government owned plant for the operating contractor. One day a programmer contacted me about a problem. Overnight, due to an A/C failure, a room housing a computer had overheated and the computer was damaged. He wanted something to monitor the temperature off hours.  I had on hand a used telephone dialer alarm box salvaged from another job and a cheap bi-metalic wall thermostat. In about an hour we had the thermostat connected to the dialer, and the dialer  set up to send a recorded message to the programmer and to the plant shift superintendent's office.

However, the room in question was considered a "vault", because the computer was used for classified information. The computer security people vetoed placing the dialer in the room, even though the walls were only gypsum board. There was no "red/black" shielding or elaborate security for the room itself, but they objected to a phone line in the room.  I suggested that they punch a hole through the wall and put only the thermostat in the "vault" with the dialer in the next room.

When I retired from that plant six months later the bureaucracy had still done mothing to address the risk of A/C failure.

Another time I needed a source of low pressure air regulated to about 1" water pressure for calibrating a transmitter. I requested a unit sold to regulate natural gas pressure for a furnace, which I could adjust for my application. The purchasing people said they couldn't buy it unless it was approved by the plant fire safety department. I explained that I wasn't going to use it for a furnace but simply to regulate air pressure. That made no difference to them. I never got what I needed.

 

nyeng
User Rank
Gold
Re: tangent; IQ testing bias
nyeng   10/16/2013 7:05:49 PM
NO RATINGS
I dealt with some GM people first hand while working for a large, evil, tier 1 supplier. GM has some very intelligent people, however there seems to be a vein of arrogance. It's like "We are the almighty GM and we are the experts in everything we do." Now I'd like to expand this to my broader experience in auto manufacturing. It's all about moving product. Plant managers want to make their numbers at all cost. They will knowingly ship questionable product to make theire numbers. They make their number for their bonus and if there's a warranty problem you blame it on the design engineers. That said, the engineer at the plant doesn't want you to resolve the issue. He wants you to fix it and get it running asap. Doing something to reduce the cycle time is sacriledge. If he lets you do that his ass is on the line for letting you do something that may reduce throughput. He wants you to fix it as it is. That would mean either fixing it regularly (for free) or else upgrading to bigger servos or a cooling system or whatever (for free, of course). You are supposed to quickly bow to their demands for no charge because "We are the almighty GM and you take care of this or we never buy from you again." That's my take on the situation based on my own auto industry experience and opinions.

nyeng
User Rank
Gold
Re: Management by monkeys
nyeng   10/16/2013 7:01:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I dealt with some GM people first hand while working for a large, evil, tier 1 supplier.  GM has some very intelligent people, however there seems to be a vein of arrogance.  It's like "We are the almighty GM and we are the experts in everything we do."


Now I'd like to expand this to my broader experience in auto manufacturing.  It's all about moving product.  Plant managers want to make their numbers at all cost.  They will knowingly ship questionable product to make theire numbers.  They make their number for their bonus and if there's a warranty problem you blame it on the design engineers.



That said, the engineer at the plant doesn't want you to resolve the issue.  He wants you to fix it and get it running asap.  Doing something to reduce the cycle time is sacriledge.  If he lets you do that his ass is on the line for letting you do something that may reduce throughput.  He wants you to fix it as it is.  That would mean either fixing it regularly (for free) or else upgrading to bigger servos or a cooling system or whatever (for free, of course).   You are supposed to quickly bow to their demands for no charge because "We are the almighty GM and you take care of this or we never buy from you again."



That's my take on the situation based on my own auto industry experience and opinions.


nyeng
User Rank
Gold
Re: Management by monkeys
nyeng   10/16/2013 7:00:41 PM
NO RATINGS
I dealt with some GM people first hand while working for a large, evil, tier 1 supplier.  GM has some very intelligent people, however there seems to be a vein of arrogance.  It's like "We are the almighty GM and we are the experts in everything we do."


Now I'd like to expand this to my broader experience in auto manufacturing.  It's all about moving product.  Plant managers want to make their numbers at all cost.  They will knowingly ship questionable product to make theire numbers.  They make their number for their bonus and if there's a warranty problem you blame it on the design engineers.


That said, the engineer at the plant doesn't want you to resolve the issue.  He wants you to fix it and get it running asap.  Doing something to reduce the cycle time is sacriledge.  If he lets you do that his ass is on the line for letting you do something that may reduce throughput.  He wants you to fix it as it is.  That would mean either fixing it regularly (for free) or else upgrading to bigger servos or a cooling system or whatever (for free, of course).   You are supposed to quickly bow to their demands for no charge because "We are the almighty GM and you take care of this or we never buy from you again."


That's my take on the situation based on my own auto industry experience and opinions.

nyeng
User Rank
Gold
Re: Management by monkeys
nyeng   10/16/2013 6:59:45 PM
NO RATINGS
I dealt with some GM people first hand while working for a large, evil, tier 1 supplier.  GM has some very intelligent people, however there seems to be a vein of arrogance.  It's like "We are the almighty GM and we are the experts in everything we do."


Now I'd like to expand this to my broader experience in auto manufacturing.  It's all about moving product.  Plant managers want to make their numbers at all cost.  They will knowingly ship questionable product to make theire numbers.  They make their number for their bonus and if there's a warranty problem you blame it on the design engineers.


That said, the engineer at the plant doesn't want you to resolve the issue.  He wants you to fix it and get it running asap.  Doing something to reduce the cycle time is sacriledge.  If he lets you do that his ass is on the line for letting you do something that may reduce throughput.  He wants you to fix it as it is.  That would mean either fixing it regularly (for free) or else upgrading to bigger servos or a cooling system or whatever (for free, of course).   You are supposed to quickly bow to their demands for no charge because "We are the almighty GM and you take care of this or we never buy from you again."


That's my take on the situation based on my own auto industry experience and opinions.

nyeng
User Rank
Gold
Re: Management by monkeys
nyeng   10/16/2013 6:58:43 PM
NO RATINGS
I dealt with some GM people first hand while working for a large, evil, tier 1 supplier.  GM has some very intelligent people, however there seems to be a vein of arrogance.  It's like "We are the almighty GM and we are the experts in everything we do."


Now I'd like to expand this to my broader experience in auto manufacturing.  It's all about moving product.  Plant managers want to make their numbers at all cost.  They will knowingly ship questionable product to make theire numbers.  They make their number for their bonus and if there's a warranty problem you blame it on the design engineers.


That said, the engineer at the plant doesn't want you to resolve the issue.  He wants you to fix it and get it running asap.  Doing something to reduce the cycle time is sacriledge.  If he lets you do that his ass is on the line for letting you do something that may reduce throughput.  He wants you to fix it as it is.  That would mean either fixing it regularly (for free) or else upgrading to bigger servos or a cooling system or whatever (for free, of course).   You are supposed to quickly bow to their demands for no charge because "We are the almighty GM and you take care of this or we never buy from you again."


That's my take on the situation based on my own auto industry experience and opinions.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Management by monkeys
TJ McDermott   10/15/2013 6:55:21 PM
NO RATINGS
There is at least one more solution to this problem:

Add an expensive and maintenance-intensive liquid-cooling jacket to each motor.

Add an expensive but lighter compressed air cooling system to each motor.

No, I'm not serious, but I'd have liked to see the response from the monkey-managers.

 

One could also ask the M.M. which solution they came up with that is better than the engineer's.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: You can't fix stupid
William K.   10/14/2013 9:34:29 PM
NO RATINGS
The problem that I run into is that it can't wait to be fixed because I am getting blamed for problems brought on by others. So sometimes I just must solve problems that are not created by me, not my responsibility, and not really my problem, just because I need to keep the problem from becoming my problem, or my burden.

So if the job needs to be done sometimes I do it, despite cries that it is not my job to do it. Because sometimes that doesn't matter very much. And yes, it does sometimes cause repercussions. Oh Well.

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: You can't fix stupid
GlennA   10/14/2013 11:13:44 AM
NO RATINGS
William K;  And also "Even a blind man could see it is wrong".  There are times when you look at something that is so obviously wrong that it shouldn't have to be explained, but even after explaining it, it still doesn't sink in.  So all that is left to do is wait for the failure and say "Who would have thunk it ?"

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Really hot servo motors.
William K.   10/13/2013 10:35:49 PM
NO RATINGS
There exists a problem in that a lot of unknowing people are terribly afraid to do anything that is not the way that it has always been done, so when I suggest a means of solving a problem that is different from the method that did not solve the problem they are afraid, and often it is not possible to explain to them how the alternate method would work, because they are unable to think, their minds being clouded with fear. So sometimes I leave them to suffer their disaster. This happens because "you can't fix stupid". Note that I did not originate that phrase, but it certainly fits sometimes.

Page 1/4  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Taking energy from renewable sources, recycling existing energy, and using components that don’t need much energy at all are becoming critical industrial and consumer design criteria.
Sales of semiconductors, interconnects, and other electronic components in North America were flat through the second quarter of 2015, reflecting a pattern that’s been repeating itself for several years.
Texas Instruments has produced an e-book intended to get you up to snuff on the Industrial Internet of Things.
A South African startup is combining recycled plastic with solar power to give underprivileged schoolchildren a stylish schoolbag that also supplies them with light to study by.
An in-depth survey of 700 current and future users of 3D printing holds few surprises, but results emphasize some major trends already in progress. Two standouts are the big growth in end-use parts and metal additive manufacturing (AM) most respondents expect.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
8/13/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/24/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/11/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 31 - Sep4, Embedded System Design Techniques™ - Writing Portable and Robust Firmware in C
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service