HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
RE: Making people have fun
Cabe Atwell   10/23/2013 6:48:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Looks like fun for a short while... like the Minecraft craze. My nephew played that for a month and never went back...

Though I am hoping for more.



AnandY
User Rank
Gold
RE: Making people have fun
AnandY   10/8/2013 8:54:29 AM
NO RATINGS
This new venture is interesting. Talking from experience, playing the same game with the same features and characters becomes boring in the long last. Being able to create your own characters and moves is just the ultimate video game changer. It will be able to satisfy the gamers' and also keep track of trending movies and events by incorporating them into video games. But won't it affect the video games market especially for original video game designers?

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Making People Have Fun
Nancy Golden   9/29/2013 10:06:43 PM
NO RATINGS
"The real challenge in designing a game is learning how to make people have fun" and since "fun" means different things to different people, the challenge would be to find the fun factor that meets the widest possible audience. Some people enjoy a challenge and want it to be hard - others want it to be fairly mindless. Some people want to design their own games extensively - some just want to play. The beauty of Project Spark from what I can tell is that it makes those options available to the individual - you can design as much or as little as you want and tailor it for yourself. It looks like there are two levels of design here - the overarching game environment (with decisions on how to "make people have fun" that the programmers made) and then the player environment that allows manipulation of the game code to create unique gaming environments within the game. 

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Making People Have Fun
tekochip   9/28/2013 9:29:20 AM
NO RATINGS
I think everyone should try their hand at designing games.  I worked with Pat Lawlor for a while designing coin operated games and it was a fantastic experience.  It's much harder than you think it is to make people have fun.  The music, sound effects, lights, the entire orchestration and presentation, and then the really tough stuff, like the odds.  You want the game to be challenging, but you don't want it to be so hard that nobody wants to play.  Sometimes you'll have a great idea and find that it's terrific fun, but not something that the game should do frequently.  When we did "Family Guy" we let the player get to the mini playfield right away so he could see how much fun it was, but then made it increasingly harder to use the playfield.
 
I don't mind that the video game SDK will be easy to manipulate the graphics, because moving the graphics around is just programming.  The real challenge in designing a game is learning how to make people have fun.


Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Mixed Emotions
Nancy Golden   9/27/2013 1:32:44 PM
NO RATINGS
My fifteen year old son has often expressed a desire to modify a video game he is playing. He would say "I wish I could change this or add that." When we explained how games are created through software code, he quickly realized the effort it would take to learn how to code games and to become proficient at it was more effort than he wanted to put into that direction. He will be thrilled at this new development.

From my perspective as a parent, it is good to see creativity becoming an integral component of gaming. The snippets of code are enticing - but I don't see how they will really help regarding encouraging kids to learn software programming - the instant gratification of drag and drop is much more appealing.

On the downside, I am also dreading this development when it hits the market. We often have discussions with our son about prioritizing his time and using self-control to limit his technology time, especially regarding entertainment. A lot of folks are excited about this development and it is understandable, but it also brings new challenges in teaching our children how to balance their time. 



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
From wearables to design changes to rumors of a car, Apple has multiple things cooking up in its kitchen. Here are six possibilities from Apple next week, with likely more than one coming to light.
The key to the success of alt energy is advanced automation, which is still relatively new to the energy scene.
Sherlock Ohms highlights stories told by engineers who have used their deductive reasoning and technical prowess to troubleshoot and solve the most perplexing engineering mysteries.
New fastening and joining methods are making it possible to join multiple materials and thinner sheets in consumer and medical portable electronics, as well as automotive and aviation systems.
An upcoming Digi-Key Continuing Education Center class on designing motor control using MCUs and FPGAs will show you how to choose the best hardware and tools to speed up your development time.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Mar 9 - 13, Implementing Motor Control Designs with MCUs and FPGAs: An Introduction and Update
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service