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Good applications presentation

Iron

hello all from Edmonton, Alberta. Better late than never.

Iron

SPI, RS232, USB, Ethernet, I2C

FPGA / MCU is usually given for design, limited window to change things.

Catching up on yesterday's course.

Hi Warren,

            That was an excellent overview of all the three controllers.

             It looks to me that Xelinx Zynq might suit my Automotive application of motor control. I need to check its operating temperature range.

             Thanks

Iron

Hope to see you all tomorrow.

Iron

Thanks Warren, see you tomorrow.

Iron

@All- Ok, I think I got all the questions. CU tomorrow!

Iron

@Flux- Actually MPEG conversion might come with a reference design without additional cost. You should check out Xilinx and Altera. I think Lattice has a video reference design too, but I think its HD and probably a bit more expensive. Worth a quick look however.

Iron

@Flux Altiium handles PCB design but also FPGA and embedded programming: http://www.altium.com/  about $7K.

Iron

@WarrenM - Okay, thanks.  I've used that term but not the abbreviation.  Sorry.  It makes sense now.

Iron

?? @rshankle   Is Altium free or low cost?    I thought it was a schematic capture program

@Huntwork- SoC is System on Chip. It losely is defined as a device that can implement an entire system. For example a device with a processor, peripherals, memory, etc that can operate stand alone. When I say SoC FPGA I also mean it has FPGA fabric on it. (Sorry for the late answer, I missed your question).

Iron

?? So something like getting raw video from 3 non HD cameras, and converting to MPEG....would that be concidered not to complex?     I'm new to this idea of using FPGA so nit sure what they would concider complex.  

Ok, thanks again and looking forward to tomorrow. 

Iron

@rshankle- I have heard good things about Altium but have not usd it myself. 

Iron

@Flux- Many IP blocks (the less complex ones) are free. The more complicated blocks (like fancy video conversion or high-level communications) can require a flat fee. I don;t think any of them are royalty based now. 

Iron

?? Are you familiar with Altium Designer toolset?  (It uses Xilinx, Altera and other tools on the back end to program FPGAs.)  If so have you used Altium Designer with the Zynq dev board?

Iron

@sherlock- all the peripherals shown on the block diagram are dedicated. You can easily build others in the fabric if you need to.

Iron

??So if I use one of these FPGAs on my design, and I use some of their IP.  I assume its not free.   would I have to pay a flat rate of is it a royalty based pay?  

 

@All- yep really quiet today. Must be the day everyone gets a free ice cream sunday at work...

Iron

huntwork - thanks for the sanity check.  I guess I'll form one more question that I have...

Iron

?? is it me or is the chat room really quiet?

Iron

Thanks Warren and Charles.

Iron

My question all peripheral list on Arria V is hardware dedicated core(IP)? Is it not built with configeable logic cell?

Iron

@rshankle- I think they should work with ISE, but the reference designs and examples might all be targeting Vivado. You should check with Xilinx to find out however..

Iron

??I missed the definition of SoC.  You talk about non-SoC on slide 7.  Can you define it for me please?

Iron

?? thanks.  (since it is quiet I'll ask another.) Will the Zynq dev boards work with Xilinx ISE or do you need Vavaldo (sp)?

 

Iron

@rshankle- You don't need an OS, you can just write code for it. The OS is available however if you need to implement high level functions (or application stacks, etc).

Iron

?? For the Xilinx Zynq FPGA, does the ARM chip require an operating system or can it be programmed with monolythic code (single executable like a MCU)?

 

Iron

Thanks Warren, Charles and Digikey

Iron

Thanks Warren and Charles. Great lecture.

Iron

Thanks Warren and Chuck 

 

Iron

Thanks Warren, Chuck and Digi-Key

Gold

Thank you Warren.  Very informative.

 

Iron

@All- Hi everyone. Please use a leading ? or two when you ahve a question for me.

Iron

Wired serial like RJ232 (DB-9) and usb.

Iron

THanks you Warren for the useful sessions

Warren, Thank you for another great lecture.

Iron

Interface for interprocessor and accelerator/coprocessor, FreeRTOS processor .

Iron

Have to emulate old µC performance (timing, ramp rates).  Have A/D inputs and several GPIO.  

Iron

USB (Vendor specific), Ethernet, Zygbee, SPI, UART.

Iron

some custom, SPI, I2C, and USB primarily

Iron

Typical interface standards are Ethernet, CAN, and Async Serial (RS485), and Sync Serial / HDLC.  One design required CameraLink.

Iron

SPI, I2C, 232/422/485, USB, ENET, 556 RGB LCD Interface

Iron

Target Design consists of 8 - 12 multiplexed A/D for pressure 5 A/D temperature measurement, 2 A/D for incoming line voltage and current, timing interfaces for minimum of 5 motors to determine motor load, timing circuits to interface to minimum of 4 turbine meters, Minimum of 4 pwm outputs, 16 - 24 Digital inputs, 16 - 24 digital outputs, high speed serial to interface to user interface and equipment status. Loop cycle time 100mS - 500mS. Cell phone interface. Remote software update.

Iron

Ethernet, RS232, RS485, CAN.

SPI, I2C, HD-SDI, 3G-SDI

Iron

Depends on application could be custom or any listed.

Iron

Usually SPI and Ethernet

Iron

SPI, UART and Camera Link for digital video.

Iron

SPI and CAN interfaces.

Iron

No interface standards other than USB.

Iron

what about touch panels

Iron

PCIe Standards, Ethernet (UDP/TCP)

Iron

Warren's question: What serial interface requirements do you typically have on your designs- Standards (like Ethernet or SPI) or custom?

Blogger

I have input to the team selecting the device.

Iron

Design requirements always drive the micro selection.  Typically, the requirements are an incremental design effort so the design is based of existing technology we have in place.  If the design is a total start up from scratch, research will be done to available devices to see which best meets the new requirements.  Often it will be based on processor famillies we already use, sometimes its a totally new device.  All is driven by the requirements.

Iron

Mostly select device according to requirment

Iron

We can choose but final selection usually imfluenced by the availabe IP for necessary algorithm

Iron

I will choose the FPGA for the next couple of designs, they will be chosen based on the requirments of the design which is different in both application.

Iron

The engineering team select the devices.

Iron

I get to make the selection and it depends on the design specs which are agreed upon during the initial discussions.

Iron

I have input into selection of the MCU.

Iron

based on requirements

 

Iron

Being in R&D I get to play with a variety before giving advise for the final product.

Iron

Selection of MCU has typically been based on re-use of existing code.  Occasionally there is no need to retain software compatibility and the hardware selection is free to choose based on cost and availablility.

Iron

design drives device selection

 

Iron

Fortunately, I generally get to choose the architecture

Iron

I have total selection control.

Iron

Mostly given, but sometime 8^)

Iron

I often have an opportunity to provide input on the selection of the MCU/FPGA for our applications.

Iron

We have input on device selection...

Iron

If new design then I get to choose.

Iron

I get to spec the FPGA / MCU.

I have the ability to select the device.

Iron

Warren's question: Do you typically get to choose your target FPGA or MCU or is it a requirement for the design (by the time you get involved)?

Blogger

My designs require high reliability, low power but reasonable performance.

Iron

ultra-low power and security

Iron

High speed outputs that mus be calculated from a large image.

Iron

Cost , Security tamper proof

Iron

High speed image data stream processing.

Iron

speed, riability, low power

Iron

Real Time requirements are the key.  Timing is crucial.  (Slow speed ~1Mhz but tolerances at the low microsec level for triggers.)

Iron

high precision/stable A/D

Iron

Cost, security/authentication.

Iron

reliability and low power

 

Security, Reliability and low power.

Iron

Safety Critical and Low Power (<= 40 mW)

Iron

Ultra low power in all apps

Iron

Low power high security are main design concerns

 

Iron

Low power, reliability and cost are the primary design drivers.

Iron

Special reqs - lots of SRAM.

Iron

High reliability.  Low cost.  Power doesn't matter.

Iron

Broadcast and Video TV

Multiple Display frame buffering

 

Iron

Warren's question: Do your designs typically have any special requirements- security, reliability, ultra-low power, high-speed serial, etc?

Blogger

customize peripherals and associated timing

Iron

broadcast video/audio transmitter

Iron

Autonomous periperals.

Iron

My question all peripheral list on Arria V is hardware dedicated core(IP)? Is it not built with configeable logic cell?

Iron

Timing and peripheral control

Iron

Defense and Aerospace is close

Iron

intelligence, instrumentation

Iron

Need to grab raw video from several cameras and store it as MPEG

Wireless Infrastructure

Iron

Different, more of slower RS485/RS232 data collection manipulation

Iron

FPGA augmentation of processor

Iron

wireless infrastructure

Iron

Similar to Medical application

 

Iron

For now targeting general apps.

Iron

Warren's question: Which of these applications is the closest to your types of designs (or expected designs)?

Blogger

I haven't gone to the makers fair in the past

Iron

@trecou, There's going to be a maker fair in Kalispell in February

Gold

Any opinions on the latice ICE40 FPGA ICESTICK eval board, seels for $24.95 at Mouser.

Iron

Good afternoon, everyone

Iron

Hello from sunny Toronto, ON!

Iron

@trecou, What part of Montana are you in? I'm near Eureka

Gold

Hello from South Dakota

 

Iron

Hi all -Audio is live! If you don't see the audio bar at the top of the screen, please refresh your browser. It may take a couple tries. When you see the audio bar, hit the play button. If you experience audio interruptions and are using IE, try using FF or Chrome as your browser. Many people experience issues with IE. Also, make sure your flash player is updated with the current version. Some companies block live audio streams, so if that is the case for your company, the class will be archived on this page immediately following the class and you can listen then. People don't experience any issues with the audio for the archived version.

Hi from Chandler, AZ.

 

Iron

hello from Mishawaka

Iron

Hello from Edmonton, AB

Iron

Looking forward to another great class.  Hi all!  (Raleigh, NC)

Iron

Gold River according to Google is in CA - I now know something new myself

 

Iron

What state is Gold River in?

Blogger

Hello from sunny Atlanta.

Iron

Be sure to follow @designnews and @DigiKeyCEC on Twitter for the latest class information. We encourage you to tweet about today's class using the hashtag #CEC.

Blogger

Please join our Digi-Key Continuing Education Center LinkedIn Group at http://linkd.in/yoNGeY

Blogger

Hi from Panama City FL.

Iron

Yes, I am ready. I m learning a lot from great lecturers.

Iron

The streaming audio player will appear on this web page when the show starts at 2 PM Eastern time today. Note however that some companies block live audio streams. If when the show starts you don't hear any audio, try refreshing your browser. If that doesn't work, try using Firefox or Google Chrome as your browser. Some users experience audio interruptions with IE. If that doesn't work, the class will be archived immediately following our live taping.

Blogger

Good afternoon, rclipat. Doing good...ready for our next session.

Blogger

Hello from Summerville, South Carolina. How is everyone doing today? How are you Warren and Charles?

Iron

Be sure to click 'Today's Slide Deck' under Special Educational Materials above right to download the PowerPoint for today's session.

Blogger

Salutes from sunny Syracuse.

Good morning from Mobile, AL

Hello from Binghamton, NY

Iron

Good morning from sunny Chicago.

Blogger

Good morning from Portland Oregon

Iron


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