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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Rob Spiegel   9/22/2013 3:44:19 PM
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That's right, Chuck. I thought the effect of tasers was well represented in "The Hangover."

Charles Murray
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Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Charles Murray   9/20/2013 6:50:40 PM
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Yes, judging by some recent news videos I've seen, tasers can occasionally be used a little too cavalierly.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Rob Spiegel   9/18/2013 11:38:19 PM
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Chuck, I think that's a good idea that police officers have to be tazed before they start to taze others.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: “Oh Voltage, Schmoltage!"
Charles Murray   9/18/2013 6:14:44 PM
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Good point, armorris. Medical cardioversion typically uses fairly high voltage, with extremely low currents (in the mA range). On the surface, the low currents would appear to be benign, but coupled with a high voltage (100 V to 700V, as I understand), it's enough to stop a person's heart and allow it to re-set. So while it's true it doesn't kill the patient, it does stop the heart momentarily. Maybe a reader who designs these devices can weigh in with more (and better) information.

Charles Murray
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Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Charles Murray   9/18/2013 6:08:43 PM
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Thanks for the info, AWltom. I'm amazed they did that. I quickly looked on Amazon for a stun gun, saw the 14,000,000 V part number and assumed they were claiming that it was 14 million Volts. It's clearly a marketing ploy, and I'm sure I'm not the only one who made that ssumption.

Charles Murray
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Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Charles Murray   9/18/2013 6:03:36 PM
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I did not have my hand up, Rob. The reporter who volunteered also allowed it to be filmed by a crew, and I think he was sorry he did. The Wall Street Journal actually posted it on their web site for awhile, but then they pulled it down, which was a good move. By the way, I have a nephew who's an Oakland police officer, and I believe he had to be tazed as part of his training.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: “Oh Voltage, Schmoltage!"
armorris   9/18/2013 2:53:17 PM
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1 saves
High voltage is definitely dangerous when there is high current available. Ohms Law says that voltage is required to get current to flow through a resistance. You should never disregard a "High Voltage" sign.

A Van De Graaff generator produces a lot of voltage, but with very little available current. A stun gun also produces relatively small current. It can cause paralysis or pain, but produces no harm unless it passes through the heart, causing fibrillation. 

Tom-R
User Rank
Gold
Re: Exaggerated output voltage
Tom-R   9/18/2013 1:38:33 PM
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Reminds me of the toy company that named their stacking brick toys 0937. In the right font it spelled LEGO, upside down. What a coincidence...

kenish
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
kenish   9/18/2013 1:37:10 PM
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14MV with a flashlight....isn't that called lightning?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sound waves rate the strength of the gun
Rob Spiegel   9/18/2013 11:26:27 AM
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I can't believe someone would volunteer to be tazed, Chuck. I woiuld imagine you didn't have your hand up.

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