HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Page 1/3  >  >>
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
RE: Researchers Develop Stronger Material for Earthquake-Resistant Bridges
Elizabeth M   9/25/2013 10:26:18 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the comment, AandY. I think it points to the opinion of the researchers, which expect that there will be other benefits that outweigh the increased costs of the material.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Correct scale?
Elizabeth M   9/25/2013 9:47:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Good question, Ann. I'd have to go back to my notes to see about the scale of the models. The closer to real-life deployment, the better, of course.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Correct scale?
Ann R. Thryft   9/24/2013 11:33:49 AM
NO RATINGS
Aside from the potentially larger cost differential, I also wonder if the simulations and other testing the researchers did adequately took into account the scale involved of the actual columns. Were the models full scale or smaller?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cost Estimate
Ann R. Thryft   9/20/2013 1:01:14 PM
NO RATINGS
I remember traveling to Boston, for the first time, and the Big Dig was in process. What a complete mess! My fellow editor, an excellent driver and navigator who did all the driving and had gone to the same show in the same location a zillion times before, got lost, for the first time ever, on the way from the airport.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
RE: Researchers Develop Stronger Material for Earthquake-Resistant Bridges
Elizabeth M   9/19/2013 3:42:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, AandY, your comments and concerns echo what a lot of our readers think about this. While most agree it's a good step forward to strengthen structures against damage from quakes, they worry about the potential expense.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
RE: Researchers Develop Stronger Material for Earthquake-Resistant Bridges
AnandY   9/19/2013 2:13:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Earthquakes have for long been the cause of major destruction of infrastructure and these stronger materials should not only be used in bridges but everything else. Being able to have an earthquake that will only shake the ground and that's it is something that would come as a blessing since it is practically impossible to stop the earthquakes. What I am more worried about is the costs of the materials. The nickel titanium is not something that is as abundant as iron. This is a good idea but the sources of these minerals should also be considered. As far as the cost is concerned I do not thing it would be a bad idea since they would also last.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scaling up
Charles Murray   9/18/2013 6:27:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Nadine, too much flexibility is definitely a bad thing. I believe that was the case with the famed Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse, I think the consensus (if there is one) was that the bridge's long stiffening girder was too long and too flexible. See link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zczJXSxnw

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cost Estimate
Elizabeth M   9/18/2013 12:24:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I completely understand where you're coming from, OC. I traveled a lot to Boston while the Big Dig was going on and know what a nightmare that was for everyone it affected, either directly or indirectly. There definitely should be more fiscal responsibility from the outset for such projects.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cost Estimate
OLD_CURMUDGEON   9/18/2013 12:19:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth: 

NOT me, personally, BUT me as part of a community which through our taxes has paid for civic projects that became boondoggles, wells of corruption, graft, mismanagement, etc.

There are two blatant examples of such projects in recent U.S. history..... In the 1970s, LILCO (LONG ISLAND LIGHTING CO.) decided to build a nuclear electric power generating facility on the north shore of the Island.  The proposal was for $65 MILLION.  By the time it was sold to the State of New York, after 20 years of re-engineering, graft, corruption, etc., it cost the ratepayers of L.I. about $4 BILLION, and it never produced one watt of electric power for consumption by the public.

The second glaring example is the "BIG DIG" in the Boston area.  Again, the cost overruns & incompetent engineering & other factors turned this project into the debacle of the century.  It was so bad that the TV program, 60 MINUTES, did a segment on it.

I'm sure that IF one set his/her mind to it, they could find countless examples across this country of similar examples!

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cost Estimate
Elizabeth M   9/18/2013 12:05:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi, OLD CURMUDGEON. Thanks for your comment. So I take it you've had some experience along these lines? It's a shame that this is probably an all-too-frequent scenario!

Page 1/3  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Lumus and eyeSight have partnered to create consumer-grade devices that offer all the prime functions of smart glasses without the bulk.
VisLab joins the autonomous car effort with the DEEVA prototype.
NASA and Boeing developed a huge, carbon composite cryogenic fuel tank for deep space missions, and started testing it last month. The 18-ft cryotank will enable heavy-lift launch vehicles to send both humans and robots into deep space.
Focus on Fundamentals -- a new Design News webinar series -- kicks off April 29 with How to Select Drives for Robotics Applications. Don't miss it!
Research and other advancements in the realms of robotics, diagnostic and treatment devices, nanotechnology, and medical implants may one day make humans superior versions of their natural selves.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service