HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 3/3
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scaling up
Elizabeth M   9/16/2013 4:10:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Chuck. I do think this is quite a significant breakthrough as well. And having lived in SF and felt several earthquakes there (not Lomo Prieta, though) and also here in Portugal, where I live now (which is also prone to quakes), I think anything that can keep structures safer without being too much of a financial burden is a good thing.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scaling up
Elizabeth M   9/16/2013 4:08:18 AM
NO RATINGS
These are all really good points, Nadine. There could be such a thing as too much flexibility. I don't know how many people would feel comfortable on a bridge that is noticeably swaying (I personally never felt bridges like the Golden Gate sway and I think that's the point--they do, but you can't feel it). But I think with testing and perfecting of the material these issues could be addressed.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Scaling up
NadineJ   9/14/2013 6:36:25 PM
NO RATINGS
It seems like this would be more viable for elevated freeways than for bridges. Images of the freeway collapse in the 1995 Kobe Quake are more haunting than the section (or seam) that detached on the upper deck of the Bay Bridge in 1989. 

A little flexibility in a bridge is good.  Too much is frightening.  The Golden Gate Bridge has a nice sway on a windy day.  How would this material react to high wind?   What additional precautions are needed to prevent corrosion? 

Overall, I agree that a 3% increase is marginal and worth the benefits.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
cost - benefit
vimalkumarp   9/14/2013 12:29:09 PM
NO RATINGS
the high cost could be recuperated in long-term maintenance and other benefits in using the material will justify its usage. alongwith SHM ( Stuctural Health Monitorign) systems this will reduce danages even with a strong earthquake.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scaling up
Charles Murray   9/13/2013 6:01:50 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree with naperlou and TJ on all counts. Superelasticity -- which I assume describes the ability to recover (and not deform plastically) from massive stresses -- would be the natural solution. In a sense, I assume this is similar to battery research in that the researchers spend lots of time looking for a chemistry with just the right material properties. To get there for only a 3% bump in cost sounds miraculous. Great story.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scaling up
TJ McDermott   9/13/2013 11:42:16 AM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth, I agree with Naperlou.  3% cost increase for materials does not sound like a significant concern.  Projects of bridge and tunnel scale go over budget by vastly more than that every time.

There was no mention of corrosion reisistance.  Is Nickel-Titanium more resistant to corrosion than the steel used in re-bar?

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Scaling up
naperlou   9/13/2013 9:25:01 AM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth, wow!  Talk about scaling up!  From eyeglass frames to bridge supports.  It is incredible that the engineers would have thought to use it.  And, 3% is not bad for a safety critical improvement.

<<  <  Page 3/3


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
These futuristic military robots will help soldiers and other military personnel better perform their duties.
Icon Labs has developed a whitepaper to help determine the type of cybersecurity needed based on the type of device.
The FDA has just released draft guidelines for using 3D printing in the design, development, and manufacture of regulated medical products. Although the recommendations are non-binding, they do set some much-needed parameters.
We're talking a look at 10 of the coolest technologies being developed by the US military today. In addition to saving lives on the battlefield, don't be surprised if you see some of these in your daily life some time in the near future.
Here's a look at the Bureau of Labor stats on engineering jobs over the coming decade.
More:Blogs|News
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service