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Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Breakthroughs
Elizabeth M   9/11/2013 8:45:29 AM
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Thanks, Greg. I understand what you mean about platinum. Sometimes in research there's a great discovery or breakthrough, but the materials make it too expensive commercially so altneratives must be found before the technology makes it to prime time. This time the cheaper alternative was one of the things that made the discovery significant.

Elizabeth M
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Re: New materials
Elizabeth M   9/11/2013 8:32:31 AM
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I know what you mean, Chuck, but with all the technologies that we both have been writing about, it seems like one of these thrown against the wall has got to stick eventually.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Breakthroughs
Greg M. Jung   9/10/2013 8:06:50 PM
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Thanks for the informative article which shows this new breakthrough.  I was especially encouraged by the use of an alternative material to platinum, which will should someday be more economical to produce.

Charles Murray
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Re: New materials
Charles Murray   9/10/2013 7:05:09 PM
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The oxygen sponge seems like a great technology for use in fuel cells, Liz. With all of the new battery technologies you're writing about, let's hope one of them (maybe this), can eventually reach the market.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
New materials
Elizabeth M   9/10/2013 6:11:12 AM
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Many of the new designs in energy and storage sources are relying on the development and use of new or different materials than typically used in the past. This oxygen "sponge" is a fine example of where this type of innovation is going, particularly in battery chemistry, an area in which researchers are trying a number of different things to come up with stronger and better ways to store energy.

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