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Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Taking Down The Tent Was Trouble
Debera Harward   9/9/2013 12:52:53 AM
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I totally agree with Chris , that the last moments or the packing moments not only from trailing or camping but from every trip are just very tiring one just wants everything to be easily managed rather than having messed up with the things brought. My experience is this that not only with tents but all such things having stretchable material and have to be placed in a bag are very difficult to repack .

Definitely with all such things the companies sales does get drop down because if someone has gone through this situation he or she will forward the experience  to the nearones and because of word of mouth they are not going to invest in that product of the organisaztion.

kenish
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Popin' Fresh
kenish   9/8/2013 2:13:04 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm an Eagle Scout too and remember the canvas tent days.  Another problem was separating the sectional poles (usually steel).  The poles were under compression and the sections would often get tightly jammed.  Getting the two biggest Scouts to apply tension and torsion sometimes wasn't enough...lightly heating the stuck joint over the camp stove was one trick and so was pre-applying WD-40.

The "big box effect" happens in mountain bikes, too.  Components on most bikes  (cassettes, chainrings, hubs, seat posts, derailleurs, handlebars, etc) follow industry standards...replacements or upgrades have multiple sources that will fit the bike.  "Big box" bikes have a good price tag but parts are generally custom and more failure-prone.  For example, front sprockets (chainrings) are usually a thin steel stamping instead of CNC steel or aluminum.  Once a part breaks or wears out it's often time to buy a whole new bike.  I encourage friends buying their first bike to spend $200 more at a cycle shop or on Craigslist.

I understand not spending too much on gear that's used a few times a year, or used a few times then forgotten in the garage...but there's *too* inexpensive with any purchase.  

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Popin' Fresh
Cadman-LT   9/8/2013 3:17:22 AM
NO RATINGS
Rob, ohh yes the good ole canvas tents. Those were fun! And so light as well!

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Near the truck
Cadman-LT   9/8/2013 3:09:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Luckily you were near your truck and didn't hike in somewhere and have to lug it out. That could have been a very bad situation.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Popin' Fresh
William K.   9/7/2013 8:01:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, if you are going to fold up a wet tent and put it away wet, you would be better off just putting it in the trash, since wet tents get quite moldy most of the time. First you dry the tent and then it will be a lot simpler to fold and put away, and it will be quite usable the next time. I learned that in the Boy scouts, troop 1610.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Uh-oh
Dave Palmer   9/7/2013 12:37:31 AM
NO RATINGS
I have a couple of cheap Ozark Trails tents from Walmart (one for my wife and me, and one for our kids), and they have worked out just fine.  But I opted not to get the "instant tent" described here.  I figued that putting up a tent is easy enough, so why bother making it any easier? I'm glad I made that decision, because it appears to have saved me a lot of trouble.  Just get the "normal" tent, instead of the "instant" one, and you'll be fine.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Duffle Bag / Sealed Seams
OLD_CURMUDGEON   9/6/2013 2:32:17 PM
Jim_E:  Not so hard when you have close to 100 years of observing "stuff" on the shelves of hardware stores.  An internet search is probably the LAST place I'd look for a solution.  I know everyone raves about the "wonderfulness" of the internet w/ it's almost limitless source of info, but it seems that everytime I try it, I wind up getting lost in a maze of gobbledy-gook.  I guess that's why the byline, OLD_CURMUDGEON fits me to a T!!!!

ADIOS!

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Duffle Bag / Sealed Seams
Jim_E   9/6/2013 2:16:29 PM
NO RATINGS
O_C, good idea about GE Silicone or liquid rubber.  It had to be something that bonds well to the fabric and I think those things would likely do the trick.

I should have searched the web before asking, as there are many products out there for this purpose like this one:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/13848651

Thanks folks!

rz6d44
User Rank
Iron
Uh-oh
rz6d44   9/6/2013 1:34:50 PM
NO RATINGS
I literally just bought one of these tents during my lunch break, and just returned to see this article. The price seemed reasonable, and last night after watching the video of set-up and take-down of this tent on Walmart's website, decided I would pick one up today. The website bragged that the tent could be set-up or taken down in 30 seconds, and the video confirmed it. Of course, they didn't show the man trying to put the tent back in the carrying case. My wife and I joked that they didn't show that because it would take much longer than the 30 seconds they bragged about. But we figured, no big deal if it takes 5 minutes to get it back in the case. Well, based on what I just read, guess it will be a big deal. I will find out this weekend! I think I will do what someone else suggested, and get a big duffel bag for it.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Duffle Bag / Sealed Seams
OLD_CURMUDGEON   9/6/2013 1:29:42 PM
NO RATINGS
How about some "LIQUID RUBBER" or one of the other "LIQUID ......." products?  Or, failing that, how about some GE pliable silicone seal.  There are products in HOME DEPOT & LOWES which state their "cured" state on the packaging.  Sounds like a simple fix from afar......

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