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Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Could have used one the other day
Jim_E   10/24/2013 8:31:07 AM
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Again, I could have used a 3D scanner and printer the other day.  The plastic coupler on the front of one of my son's Tomy toy trains broke, and he asked me to glue it.  I knew it was doubtful that glue would hold due to the slippery type of plastic and high force that the coupler has when in operation, but I gave it a shot. 

I first tried model cement, hoping that it would be able to bond the small piece, but it didn't work, probably because the type of plastic.  Actually, it didn't stick at all!  Next I'm going to try my gorilla glue brand super glue, but I don't have high hopes. 

Being able to scan and print one of these couplers would have been awesome.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Power to the People
Cabe Atwell   10/23/2013 6:58:48 PM
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About time the 3D scanners get more accessible. Anything is possible. Will this lead to an explosion of lawsuits, like copying music?

C

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Power to the People
Jim_E   9/6/2013 12:07:52 PM
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I agree that the ability to print small, broken pieces would be terrific!  With the variety of materials needed though, it almost seems like a niche for a fix-it shop to have this equipment. 

I would love to have machine that would generate parts in different types of plastics and metals, but I don't see that happening unless a new technology comes along that lets one machine do the different types of materials.

kellerbl
User Rank
Silver
Power to the People
kellerbl   9/5/2013 5:08:37 PM
I want to see products that offer downloadable 3D files for small pieces that may break to a larger item (e.g. lawnmower parts). I would use such availability as a plus for purchase decisions. Printing my own part may be more expensive than what the manufactured part costs, but not after their profit and distribution costs are included plus my gas consumed to drive across town to pick up the part at the only shop that carries them.


I have a few older items with broken pieces and it would be great to be able to fix them by creating a new piece that fits perfectly. For this I would need the ability to scan the currently broken piece and then edit it to smooth out what is wrong. In some cases you may have access to duplicate pieces so you have one that is not broken to use for scanning, but not always. It will be better in the long run if manufacturers provided the 3D models for each piece on their website to registered owners. They don't have to put every piece out there - just the small, easily broken ones.

RichardS
User Rank
Silver
Re: Disruptive technology
RichardS   9/5/2013 9:07:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Good luck with enforcing any design patents and copyrighted designs now. As the 3D additive technology technology continues to evolve at lightning pace, experts predict that even metal parts will be possible to copy and fabricate on the dining room table one day. The legal paradigm for "who to sue" goes out the window, as the power is passed to the individual and those pockets just aren't as deep making broad legal action unjustifiable. Just like Linux, open source development will keep this technology moving forward.  Good luck with the legal and governmental regulation side. Remember the public backlash that rights administrators took over the poor mom who was sued for downloading Happy Birthday from Napster? This genie is now out of the bottle and things will never be the same in manufacturing... ever again. Maybe, just maybe this will be a good thing?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Disruptive technology
Elizabeth M   9/5/2013 4:29:58 AM
NO RATINGS
I suspect you're right, JimT. Just as the Internet required some tweaking of telecommunications/privacy/copyright laws, so will 3D printing and scanning require something to be done about merely ripping off designs. I'm sure some case will come up sooner or later to test this technology legally.

viola80
User Rank
Iron
Digitizer
viola80   9/4/2013 11:54:09 AM
NO RATINGS
The Digitizer is available to order and is $1400.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Disruptive technology
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/4/2013 9:57:10 AM
NO RATINGS
Considering that anyone can now take a single piece-part, scan it, and reproduce it with virtually no training or skills, I have to wonder how long before manufacturers of targeted objects cry foul, with concerns of illegal duplication or copyright infringement. Makes me think of Napster.com, when the Internet suddenly made 50 years' worth of existing music available. Disruptive technology often requires we make new rules.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
3D print the world
Elizabeth M   9/4/2013 8:01:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting post, Cabe. So let me get this straight, since I am not an expert by any means on this technology--these scanners allow you to make 3D digital scans of any object and then you can transfer this to a printer via computer to print the object? (Yes, perhaps this is me taking it to a very primary level, but it sort of blows my mind--and even though i write about technology I don't have a lot of the latest gadgets and whatnot. :)) Anyway, with technology like this, I think instead of this promised Internet of Things we all go on about, maybe it's more like A World of 3D-Printed Things that is more the next big trend!



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